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EIGHTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 

Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1949 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



LIBRARY-COLLEGE PARK 




Maryland Room 
Jl&i^creity of Maryland Libri 
Coliese Park Md 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



EIGHTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 

Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1949 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION— JUNE, 1949 

Name Address Name Address 

TASKER G. LOWNDES, Pres. .. Cumberland MRS. ALVIN THALHEIMER Baltimore 

NICHOLAS OREM, Vice-Pres. . . . Hyattsville OSCAR B. COBLENTZt Catonsville 

WENDELL D. ALLEN Baltimore MRS. CURTIS WALKER Chevy Chase 

HORACE M. MORGAN Queen Anne 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer, Catonsville 



OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

1201 Mathieson Building, Baltimore-2 



State Superintendent of Schools 

THOMAS G. PULLEN. Jr. 
Ass't. State Sup't. for Vocational Education 

JOHN J. SEIDEL 

Directors 

MERLE S. BATEMAN, Certification, Ac- 
creditation 
JAMES E. SPITZNAS, Instruction 
DAVID W. ZIMMERMAN, Finance, Re- 
search 

Supervisors 

GRACE L. ALDER, Elementary Schools 
ELIZABETH AMERY, Home Economics 
BRIAN M. BENSON, Finance 
MRS. GERTRUDE N. BOWIE. School 
Lunch Program 
*GLEN D. BROWN, Industrial Education 
for Adults 
R. FLOYD CROMWELL. Guidance 
WILBUR DEVILBISS. High Schools 
THOMAS C. FERGUSON, Physical Educa- 
tion. Recreation 
R. CHRISTINE HOGAN. Statistics 
MRS. GLADYS T. HOPKINS. Curriculum 
PAUL E. HUFFINGTON, Colored Schools 
HERSHEL M. JAMES, Industrial Educa- 
tion 

HARRY M. McDonald. Agriculture 
RICHARD K. McKAY, On-the-Job Train- 
ing 

WILLIAM O'DELL. Surplus Property 
JAMES L. REID, School Lunch 

Assistant Supervisors 

LEE W. ADKINS, Veterans On-the-Farm 
Program 

CHARLES V. AKELEY, Finance. Statistics 
CHARLES C. CONLON. Jr.. Accreditation 
GEORGE M. CRAWFORD. Curriculum 
AUSTIN E. GISRIEL, On-the-Job Training 
M. ELEANOR RICE. Certification 
ETHEL E. SAMMIS, Physical Education, 
Recreation 

DOROTHY SHIRES. Elementary Schools 
MRS. M. MARIE WHEATLEY. Curriculum 

Counselor-Clerk 

EDWARD P. HAUHN 

Consultant Architect 
*F. J. THUMAN 



Medical Consultant 

*M. L. BREITSTEIN. M.D. 
Administrative Assistant I 
RUTH E. HOBBS 

Senior Clerk-Receptionist 

MRS. CATHERINE L. OWINGS 

Telephone Operator I 

MRS. WILDA R. TAYLOR 

Statisticians 

WILLIAM C. FEADER, I 

HELEN D. GEORGE. I 

MARION FREYER, II 

MRS. GENEVIEVE J. NEKERVIS, II 

Principal Account Clerks 

MRS. GRACE STEELE TRAVERS, I 
MINNIE GERBER, II 
BLANCHE E. KEEN, II 

Stenographer-Secretaries 

MARGARET E. ALBAUGH 
E. DRUSILLA CHAIRS 
ELSIE F. FORMAN 
CARRYE HAMBURGER 
MRS. HELEN C. KATENKAMP 
ELIZABETH McGINNITY 

Senior Stenographers 
ALICE ALGIE 
BEVERLY L. BENNETT 
DENA BORES 
MARGARET C. BROOKS 
HELEN P. ELLIS 
MRS. ANNA E. KTLNER 
MARTHA LEE MARSH 
MRS. JEANNE S. MORGAN 
MARTHA SAPPINGTON 
MRS. MIRIAM M. TABLER 
MRS. BETTY JEAN WAGGONER 
ZITA WALDERMAN 

Stenographer-Accounting 

MRS. LAURA M. GAITHER 

Senior Typists 

ELEANOR DUGAN 

MRS. OLIVIA GOODRICH 

Junior Clerks 

FLORENCE N. BRADY 
MRS. RUTH E. LEECH 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

1201 Mathieson Building, Baltimore-2 



Director 

R. C. THOMPSON 

Supervisors 
LIONEL BURGESS. Case Services 
GEORGE W. KELLER, Service for the 
Blind 

W. BIRD TERWILLIGER. Guidance, 
Placement, Training 



* Part time 
t Deceased 



Counselor ^ 
MYRTLE E. CHELL. Tuberculosis Cases 

Medical Consultant 
*DEAN W. ROBERTS, M.D. 

2612 N. Charles St., Baltimore-18 

Stenographer-Secretary 

KATHLEEN E. SCHEVE 

Senior Stenographers 
ANNE NUSINOV 
CHARLOTTE A. SYLVESTER 



JA 2 5 '52 



Branch Offices, Division of Vocational Reliabilitation 



Baltimore Branch 

200 W. Saratoga St., Rm. 400, Baltimorc-1 

District Supervisor 

THOMAS D. BRAUN 
Rehabilitation Counselors 

ERNEST C. ALLNUTT, Jr. 

CHARLES L. HILL 

FOY L. LUNSFORD 

IRWTN D. MEDINGER 

RUTH F. RING 

WILLIAM H. SCHOENHAAR 

H. SMITH SHUMWAY 
Stenographer-Secretary 

EMMA E. LUECKERT 
Senior Stenographers 

MILDRED R. ECK 

MRS. CHRISTINE HATCH 

BELL M. SKLAR 
Receptionist-Clerk 

MRS. OLIVE MAYO 

Central Maryland Branch 

200 W. Saratoga St., Rm. 303, Baltimore-1 
District Supervisor 

R. KENNETH BARNES 
Rehabilitation Counselor 

B. W. BARKER 



tAt 108 Washington Street. Cumberland 
iAt Board of Education, Chestertown 



Senior Stenographer 

ROBERTA M. SPOONER 

Western Maryland Branch 

170 West Washington St., Hagerstown 
District Supervisor 

KENNETH G. STONER 
Rehabilitation Counselor 

tJ. LEO DELANEY 
Senior Stenographer 

MRS. ALFREDA E. COFFMAN 

Eastern Shore Branch 
109 Calvert Building, Salisbury 
District Supervisor 

RAYMOND H. SIMMONS 
Rehabilitation Counselors 

ROBERT L. BURTON 
JFRANK A. TARBUTTON 
Senior Stenographer 

MRS. PAULINE P. DAWSON 

Southern Maryland Branch 

4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 
District Supervisor 

MERL D. MYERS 
Rehabilitation Counselor 

HENRY D. DEVLIN 
Senior Stenographer 

MRS. LILLIAN MAY BELT 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore-l 



Director 

HELEN M. CLARK 
Supervisors 

MAE GRAHAM, School and Children's 
Libraries 

MRS. NETTIE B. TAYLOR, County and 
Institutional Libraries 
Counselor 

IVEN CASE, Readers' Counselor 



Librarians 

M. E. NAOMI JOHNSON 
JOSEPHINE M. BALDWIN. Assistant 
MRS. SUZANNE V. PEARCE, Senior 
Asst. 

MRS. BEVERLY BURMEISTER, Junior 
Asst. 

Stenographer-Secretary 

RUTH TIMANUS 
Senior Stenographer 

EVELYN M. SCHABB 
Junior Typist 

CATHERINE A. HOLLAND 
Clerk-Messenger 

LOUIS EDWIN MYERS 



PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

EARLE T. HAWKINS Towson J. D. BLACKWELL Salisbury 

LILLIAN C. COMPTON Frostburg WILLIAM E. HENRY Bowie 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

31 Light Street, Baltimore-2 

HOOPER S. MILES. State Treasurer, Chair- J. P. MANNION. Director 

man THOMAS T. TTAYS. Executive Secretary 

JAMES J. LACY. State Comptroller MINNIE HAMILTON. Stenographer-Secre- 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr.. State Sup't. of tary 

Schools HELEN M. KIRKMAN. Principal Clerk 

EDWIN W. BROOME, Sup't. of Schools MRS. MAMIE RUSSELL TODD. Senior 

Montgomery County, Vice-Chairman Clerk 
ALTHEA FULLER, Principal, Allegany BERNADETTE DUFFY, Senior Typist 

County 

166252 



3 



MARYLAND COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS, DIRECTORS AND 
SUPERVISORS— June 1949 



County Address 
ALLEGANY— Cumberland 
Superintendent 

CHARLES L. KOPP 
Assistant Superintendent 

RICHARD T. RIZER 
Directors 

RALPH E. KESSLER. Special Education 
WILLIAM P. COOPER, Cafeterias 
Supervisors 

LEWYN C. DAVIS. Junior High 
JANE E. BOTSFORD. Elementary 
MILDRED WILLTSON, Elementary 
WINIFRED GREENE. Primary 
JULIUS D. LONNHOLM, Vocational and 

Adult Education 
JACK E. PLATT. Music 
•EVELYN MILLER. Home Economics 
MRS. GLADYS MILLER EATON, Cafe- 
terias 

JOSEPH T. DOWNEY. Buildings and 
Grounds 

ARTHUR G. RAMEY, Pupil Personnel 

ANNE ARUNDEL— Annapolis 
Superintendent 

DAVID S. JENKINS 
Supervisors 
♦HOWARD A. KINHART, Senior High 
RUTH V. DUDDERAR. Junior High 
MRS. DOROTHY S. KIRKLEY. Elemen- 
tary 

MRS. VIRGINIA D. MOORE, Elementary 
LEVIAH DANIEL. Elementary 
SARAH V. JONES. Colored Elementary 
FRANK C. GUNDERLOY, Vocational and 
Veterans Training 
♦DORIS CLEMENTS. Home Economics 

MARY F. FARRELL, Curriculum 
JOPi^PH H. PEPPER, Buildings and 
Grounds * 
R. HAROIvD McCANN. Maintenance 
MORRIS W. RANNELS. Transportation 
MRS. ELEANOR B. WARING. Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

BALTIMORE- Towson 
Superintendent 

EDWARD G. STAPLETON, Acting 
Assistant Superintendents 

J. A. SENSENBAUGH. Elementary Edu- 
cation 

M. LUCETTA SISK. Curriculum Instruc- 
tion 

JAMES B. O'TOOLE, Jr., Secondary 
Director 

WILLIAM T. WILLIS, Maintenance 
Supervisors 

C. JAMES VELIE, Music 
OLTVF JOBES. Art 

HERBERT R. STEINER, Physical Educa- 
tion and Health 
MARY E. KELLEHER, Home Economics 
ANNA MEEKS. Guidance 
T. M. GREENE, Business Subjects and 

Adult Education 
NORRIS A. KING. Junior High 
JENNTE E. JFSSOP. Elemer^tarv 
MYRTLE S. ECKHARDT. Elementary 
ANNA G. SHEPPARD. Elementary 
M. KATHERINE DOST. Elementary 
MRS. PAULINE HOBBS, Colored Ele- 
mentary and Junior High 
ARTHUR A. DICK, Transportation, Vo- 
cational Education 
HERMAN C. BURTON, Pupil Personnel 

CALVERT — Prince Frederick 
Superintendent 

HARRY R. HUGHES 



* Part time in this position 



County Address 
Supervisors 

CARMEN DELAPLANE, Elementary and 
High 

THELMA O. MURRAY, Colored Elemen- 

tary and High 
C. ELIZABETH REIG, Pupil Personnel 

CAROLINE— Denton 
Superintendent 

W. STEWART FITZGERALD 
Supervisors 

FRED G. USILTON, Jr., High 
BEATRICE WILLIAMS, Elementary 
*MRS. LULA D. WARD, Colored Elemen- 
tary and Hieh 
JAMES P. HILL, Pupil Personnel 

C A RROLL — Westminster 
Superintendent 

SAMUEL M. JENNESS • 
Supervisors 

JOHN F. WOODEN, Jr., High 
RUTH E. DeVORE, Elementary 
CHARLES E. RECK, Elementary 
*PHILIP S. ROYER, Music 
*MRS. JOSEPHINE WEST, Home Econom- 
ics and Cafeterias 
*MAE E. PRINCE, Colored Elementary and 
High 

STUART WIDENER, Maintenance, Trans- 
portation 

MAYE E. GRIMES, Pupil Personnel 

CECIL— Elkton 
Superintendent 

WILLIAM S. SARTORIUS 
Supervisors 

EDWIN B. FOCKLER, High 

OLIVE L. REYNOLDS. Elementary 

PAUL S. HYDE, Elementary 
*RACHEL E. BOYD. Home Economics 

EDWIN H. BARNES, Pupil Personnel 

CHARLES— LaPlata 
Superintendent 

F. B. GWYNN 
Supervisors 

B. LUCILE BOWIE, Elementary 
*MTLTON M. SOMERS, High 
JOSEPH C. PARKS, Colored Elementary 
and High 

MRS. CECELIA E. FARRALL. Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

DORCHESTER— Cambridge 
Superintendent 

W. THEODORE BOSTON 
Supervisors 

ALBERT S. FARVER. High 
EVELYN E. JOHNSON. Elementary 
MRS. VIOLA J. COMEGYS, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
JOHN T. COMER, Jr., Pupil Personnel 



FREDERICK— Frederick 
Superintendent 

EUGENE W. PRUITT 
Supervisors 

DUVAL W. SWEADNER. High 
MRS. LOUISE F. THOMPSON, Elemen- 
tary 

A. DRUCILLA WORTHINGTON, Elemen- 
tary 

WARREN R. EVANS, Physical Education 
and Health 
*CHARLES C. T. STULL, Music 
*MRS. DOROTHY S. RANCK. Home Eco- 
nomics 



4 



County Address 



County Address 



♦CHARLES E. HENSON, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
RUTH MacVEAN, School Lunch 
GfiORGE W. CULLER, Maintenance 
GERTRUDE SMITH, Pupil Personnel 

GARRETT— Oakland 

Superintendent 

R. BOWEN HARDESTY 

Supervisors 

FOSTER D. BITTLE, High 
KATE BANNATYNE, Elementary 
MRS. CAROLINE WILSON, Elementary 
JOHN L. FITZWATER, Pupil Personnel 

HARFORD— Bel Air 
Superintendent 

CHARLES W. WILLIS 
Assistant Superintendent 

BENJAMIN S. CARROLL 
Supervisors 

THEODORE C. LOKKEN, Senior High 
DOROTHY A. MUDD, Junior High 
HAZEL L. FISHER, Elementary 
MRS. ANNE M. NOONAN, Elementary 
*PERCY V. WILLIAMS, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
*ESTELLA EVERETT, Pupil Personnel 

HOWARD— Ellicott City 

Superintendent 

HERBERT C. BROWN 

Supervisors 

MARY L. ROCKWELL, High 
R. FRANCES HAMILTON, Elementary 
MORRIS L. WOODSON, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
HARRY T. MURPHY. Pupil Personnel 

KENT— Chestertown 
Superintendent 

READE W. CORR 
Supervisors 

G. WATSON ALGIRE. High 
LOUISE HEPBRON, Elementary 
*MRS. SARA B. CHAMBERS, Colored Ele- 
mentary 

MRS. MAY M. BECK, Pupil Personnel . 

MONTGOMERY— Rockville 
Superintendent 

EDWIN W. BROOME 
Assistant Superintendents 

RICHARD E. CARPENTER, School Prop- 
erty 

EDGAR M. DOUGLASS, Administration 
Directors 

WILLIAM B. MARKS. Transportation 
ELEANOR L. SMITH. Personnel and Sta- 

K. p. GRABARKIEWICZ, Maintenance 
GEORGE W. BARCEL, Custodial Services 
MRS. PHOEBE B. MARTIN, Cafeterias 
Supervisors 

MRS. FERN D. SCHNEIDER, High 
MAXWELL E. BURDETTE, High 
ETHELEEN DANIEL, Elementary 
LTLLTAN L. GORE. Elementary 
MARY L. GRAU. Elementary 
MRS. RUTH S. GUE. Elementary 
ALTCE LUCILE ROBINSON. Elementary 

Libraries 
MARJORIE E. BILLOWS. Art 
CRESENT J. BRIDE, Physical Education 
WILLIAM C. FEDDEMAN, Industrial Ed- 
ucation 

JULIA W. WATKINS, Home Economics 
and Cafeterias 

C. MABLE SMITH, Curriculum Develop- 
ment 

MRS. LOUISE S. WALKER, Visual Aids 
EDWARD U. TAYLOR, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
T. H. OWEN KNIGHT, Pupil Personnel 



PRINCE GEORGE'S— Upper Marlboro 
Superintendent 

GARDNER SHUGART 
Assistant Superintendent 

WILLIAM S. SCHMIDT 
Director 

THOMAS S. GWYNN, Jr.. School Planning 
Supervisors , 

JOHN P. SPEICHER, High 
ROWANETTA S. ALLEN, Junior High 
EUNICE E. BURDETTE, Elementary 
A. MILDRED HOYLE, Elementary 
MRS. CATHERINE T. REED, Elementary 
MRS. MARY B. WACKWITZ, Art 
MRS. MARY J. A. CAREY, Music 
MARY A. THOMPSON, Health Education 
VINCENT C. HOLOCHWOST, Physical 

Education 
EMMA BOWMAN, Elementary 
ELMER K. ZELLER, Industrial and Adult 

Education 

*M. GLADYS DICKERSON, Home Econom- 
ics 

ELEANOR G. WEAGLY, Cafeterias 
DOSWELL E. BROOKS, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
WILLIAM W. HALL, Assistant in Col- 
ored Schools 
JOHN W. HEIM, Transportation 
ARTHUR E. ROBINSON, Maintenance 
KATHLEEN SHEARS, Pupil Personnel 

QUEEN ANNE'S— Centreville 
Superintendent 

FRANKLIN D. DAY 
Supervisors 

GEORGE T. PRATT, High 

MRS. MARGARET S. STACK, Elementary 

MRS. LOLA P. BROWN, Colored Elemen- 
tary and Pupil Personnel 

ST. MARY'S — Leonardtowrn 

Superintendent 

LETTIE M. DENT 

Supervisors 

CAREY E. LACEY, High 
E. VIOLETTE YOUNG, Elementary 
*MRS. MARGARET H. BURCH, Home 
Economics. School Lunch 
RALPH S. WATERS. Colored Elementary 
HARRIET H. REEDER, Pupil Personnel 

SOMERSET— Princess Anne 
Superintendent 

C. ALLEN CARLSON 
Supervisors 

JOHN L. BOND, High 

ALICE MAE COULBOURN. Elementary 
*KERMIT COTTMAN. Colored Elementary 
and High 

CHARLES O. BURNS. Jr.. Pupil Person- 
nel 



TALBOT— Easton 
Superintendent 

J. WTLLARD DAVIS 
Supervisors 

ARTHUR R. HTGGTNPOTTOM, High 
M. LILLTAN CHEEZUM. Elementary 
*W. H. FAUNTLEROY. Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
MRS. VIRGINIA DARROW. Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

WASHINGTON- Hagcrsto\vn 
Superintendent 

WILLIAM M. BRISH 
Assistant Superintendent 

WILLIAM C. DIEHL 
Supervisors 

WILBUR S. HOOPENGARDNER. Junior 
High 



* Part time in this position 



County Address 
PAULINE BLACKFORD, Elementary 
KATHERINE L. HEALY, Elementary 
ANNE H, RICHARDSON, Elementary 
MIRIAM L. HOFFMAN, Music 
ALFRED ROTH, Jr., Industrial Arts 
CATHERINE L. BEACHLEY, Guidance 
*MRS. ANORMALLE WAY, Home Eco- 
nomics 

ELEANOR HARTNETT, School Lunch 
WILBUR M. PHILLIPS, Pupil Personnel 

and Transportation 
EARL D. HUYETT, Buildings and Grounds 



WICOMICO— Salisbury 
Superintendent 

JAMES M. BENNETT 



Part time in this position 



County Address 
Supervisors 

LESTER A. HALL, High 
LOUISE MITCHELL, Elementary 
MARIE A. DASHIELL, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
CHARLES E. TILGHMAN, Pupil Person- 
nel 

WORCESTER— Snow Hill 
Superintendent 

PAUL D. COOPER 
Supervisors 
MARY A. WARREN, Elementary 
MRS. ANNIE B. DOWNING. Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
MRS. LUCY S. PILCHARD, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 



() 



CONTENTS 

Pagre 



Letter of Transmittal 8 

State Superintendent Defines Local Responsibility for Support of Pub- 
lic Education 9 

Legislation Affecting Education 15 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 36 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education 

Instruction 40 

Certification and Accreditation 48 

Finance and Research 53 

Library Extension 55 

Vocational Education 59 

Vocational Rehabilitation 61 

Enrollment, Teaching Stalf, and Number of Public and Nonpublic 

Schools 65 

School Census, 1948 66 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 74 

Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools, Births 75 

Per Cent and Index of Attendance 80 

Grade Enrollment, Nonpromotions in Elementary Schools 83 

Education for Handicapped Children 89 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, College Attended 92 

High School Enrollment: by Year and Subject 100 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 116 

Teachers by Subject, Certification, Sex, Summer School Attendance, 

Resignations, Turnover, Source 122 

Supervisory and Pupil Personnel Services 138 

Clerks in Schools; Janitors, Utility Men, etc 139 

Number Pupils Belonging, Average Salary per Teacher 140 

Number and Size of Schools 143 

Baltimore City Adult Education and Summer Schools 148 

Schools and Institutions for Atypical Children 151 

Vocational Rehabilitation 152 

Costs of Maryland Schools 

Total, Per Cent from State 154 

Distribution of Tax Dollar.. ..v 158 

Cost per Pupil 160 

Salaries 166 

Vocational Program, Adult Education 168 

Transportation 172 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 177 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 181 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita 187 

Per Capita Income by States and by Year in Maryland 188 

Parent-Teacher Associations 189 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland 190 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Bowie, Frostburg, Salisbury, 

Towson 191 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 198 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 199 

State and County Health Program for School Children 202 

List of Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 205 

Index 250 



7 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1950 



HONORABLE WILLIAM PRESTON LANE, Jr. 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor Lane: 

In accordance with Section 24 of Article 77 of the Laws of Maryland, 
the eighty-third "annual report, covering all operations of the State Depart- 
ment of Education and the support, condition, progress, and needs of public 
education throughout the State" for the school year ending June 1949, is 
herewith presented to you. 

During the year the State assumed additional financial responsibility 
for school building construction to house the greatly increased pupil popu- 
lation which will be enrolled in our public schools during the next eight 
years. The State is to be congratulated upon this progressive legislation 
because without this financial assistance an adequate program of school 
building construction would not have been possible. Many counties did not 
possess the financial resources to undertake the required construction. The 
grant-in-aid fund of $20,000,000 which is available upon a 1 to 3 matching 
basis up to $60 per pupil will make available $80,000,000 for new school 
construction. Also the legislation permitting the coui^ties and the City of 
Baltimore to borrow on the credit of the State up to a total of $50,000,000 
has enabled the counties to borrow on a more favorable basis. 

The continued interest and support of the citizens of Maryland are 
responsible in large measure for the progress which has been made in 
public education. 



Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. 

Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 



Tasker G. Lowndes, President 
Nicholas Orem, Vice-President 
Wendell D. Allen 
Oscar B. Coblentz* 



Horace M. Morgan 
Mrs. Alvin Thalheimer 
Mrs. Curtis Walker 



Deceased 



8 



Maryland State Department of Education 



9 



THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT DEFINES LOCAL RESPONSIBILITY 
FOR SUPPORT OF PUBLIC EDUCATION 

It is not a mere coincidence that America has become great, 
nor is it true that its physical isolation and economic resources 
have been mainly responsible for its progress. Other nations 
have enjoyed physical isolation and have had even greater 
natural resources, and still remained relatively weak internally 
and externally. America has become great because of the quality 
of its people and their philosophy of government, which recog- 
nizes first and foremost the integrity of human personality and 
the inherent and inalienable rights of the individual. This philos- 
ophy subscribes to the principle that government should be based 
upon the consent of the governed. A government thus created can 
continue to exist only if it has an enlightened citizenry, and 
the American public school system, which has no counterpart 
in any other country, was established for the purpose of indi- 
vidual enlightenment and intelligent participation in the proc- 
esses of government. An unenlightened citizenry, or one even 
partially unenlightened, is dangerous in a democracy. And it 
is at this point that the educator must be concerned. If public 
and universal education is the greatest source of strength in 
a democracy, it is dangerous to try to maintain just the status 
quo. 

Human intelligence and progress cannot subscribe to the 
theory of the absolute. The intellect is constantly revising its 
concepts in the light of new knowledge and new visions. As 
man's mental horizons are enlarged, new fields of endeavor pre- 
sent themselves and extended training is needed for everyone. 
Furthermore, as life becomes more complex for many reasons, 
but particularly because of the shrinking of spatial differences 
and the compression of individual contacts, extended controlling 
knowledge and enlightenment are essential to keep the emotions 
in check. To hold that simple educational programs are adequate 
in a constantly changing way of life is to deny the very power 
inherent in education and progress. Educational programs and 
procedures must be as ever changing as life itself. 

A nation can properly be judged by the way in which it 
treats its children. Some one has said that "The march of 
progress is made upon the feet of little children." Undoubtedly, 
the progress of nations in modern times shows a high correlation 
with the extent to which they have offered educational oppor- 
tunities to their children. And the converse is equally true. For 
substantiation of these statements, one has but to read the 
reports which were prepared a few years ago by the United 
States Chamber of Commerce on the relationship between edu- 
cation and standards of living in various communities. 

As a democratic people we are committed to the principle 
that everyone shall have equal opportunity in life, in contrast 
to the medieval philosophy of a single ruling group. We have 



10 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



dedicated ourselves to a philosophy of government that opens 
the doors of political opportunity to everyone regardless of 
everything save citizenship. In brief, we have entrusted our 
destiny and our very existence to the people themselves. It is 
but a truism to say that our leaders in such a system of govern- 
ment will rise no higher than the level of enlightenment of the 
populace. 

Only reactionaries, dangerous in their stupidity and lack 
of vision, would oppose the extension of universal enlightenment. 
Our civilization is moving along at a rapid pace, time is running 
out, and *'it is later than you think." Now, possibly more than 
at any time in our history, is there need for inspired and thought- 
ful leadership in respect to the training of people to govern them- 
selves. The greatest danger Americans face is probably internal, 
a loss of faith in the principles and institutions established by 
their fathers for the greater glory of man and of God. It be- 
hooves the thoughtful and enlightened to align himself on the 
side of progress. Let him remember that ''the hazards of return- 
ing are as great as those of going on." 

Responsibility for Public Education 

Historically, we have subscribed to the principle of state 
responsibility for public education. This principle is not anti- 
thetical to local control and initiative in respect to schools. 
Briefly, this principle holds that the state is concerned with the 
education of all its future citizens, not with that of just a few 
of them. Further, it holds that the state is concerned with all 
levels of education. This responsibility of the state is the para- 
mount and fundamental purpose of its existence, for upon the 
degree to which it fulfills this obligation depends the future wel- 
fare and well-being of its citizens. 

It is no credit to a state to be able to point to a few superior 
educational systems within its borders when there are just as 
many systems relatively as far down on the other end of the 
scale. Moral and legal responsibility cannot leave such an im- 
portant matter to chance. There must be a definite and specific 
program of education on a state-wide basis, constantly revised 
in the light of new needs and problems. 

The state must guarantee a minimum program of education 
to every child regardless of where he lives. There are several 
reasons why there must be a minimum standard of education 
required for all children of the state. 

In the first place, it is morally right, as the state cannot 
properly practice discrimination among its citizens. 

Secondly, we are a mobile nation, and ignorance has a 
tendency to roam. Before the recent war, some sociologists esti- 
mated that as a people we were about thirty per cent mobile ; that 
is, about thirty per cent of us did not live as adults where we 
were born and reared. Undoubtedly, during and since the war, 



Maryland State Department of Education 



11 



the percentage of mobility is greater than it was previously. 
The less-favored individuals have a tendency to gravitate in 
large numbers to the better-favored communities. There, if they 
are unable to compete because of their limited educational ex- 
periences, they tend to become a charge upon the community 
and to lower the standard of living. For this reason, the better- 
favored communities, as a matter of enlightened self-interest, 
must be willing to assist in the educational costs of the poorer 
communities. 

Thirdly, the state, or society, cannot afford to permit ignor- 
ance or relatively great disparity of educational opportunities 
to exist anywhere within its borders, because like the rotten 
apple in the barrel, ignorance contaminates everything around 
it. Ignorance is the cesspool in which the dread disease of 
demagogy nourishes and flourishes; it is the canker that de- 
stroys the healthy body. Reference to Gestalt's psychology or a 
briefer text, the Twelfth Chapter of First Corinthians, will 
convince anyone that what affects a part affects the whole. We 
do not refuse to remove at any cost a physical danger, so why 
should we hesitate to eliminate so powerful an enemy to our 
way of life ? 

Dangerous ideologies, particularly in the field of political 
theory, have found a fertile ground in the minds of those whose 
educational opportunities are greatly limited as compared with 
those of the more fortunate; a gulf in the body politic has 
ensued. Anyone acquainted with history or who has traveled 
in practically any foreign country, can testify to the accuracy 
of this statement. There cannot be too wide a gap between the 
intellectual levels of a people if commonalty of understanding 
is desired. 

Finally, this minimum program must be suf!iciently high 
to guarantee the degree of enlightenment necessary for the 
recipient to participate intelligently in the democratic processes. 
As time goes on and these processes become more involved and 
complex, the standards must be raised. It is for this reason that 
there must be a continuous program of study and revision of 
education on a state-wide basis. In our scheme of things this 
kind of program must be as changing and continuous as time 
itself. To quote the immortal Jefferson: 

"I know of no safe depository of the ultimate 
powers of society but the people themselves ; • and if 
we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their 
control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not 
to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by 
education. 

"No government can continue good but under the 
control of the people." 



12 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



There is another aspect of this problem. Minimum educa- 
tional standards for all means everyone. Such a concept com- 
prehends not only the typical but also the atypical. It includes 
education of the lame, the halt, and the blind, the mentally 
retarded, the part-time student, the adult, and those who can 
profit from a program of higher education. 

If the state is responsible for public education and it pre- 
scribes the minimum educational opportunities for all, it natur- 
ally follows that it must see to it that every local school unit 
is financially able to carry out the requirements. The state then 
must guarantee the program regardless of where the wealth of 
the state may lie, and in such a fashion that no local community 
shall tax itself disproportionately to carry the required burden. 

No state hesitates to tax everyone for a common good. With 
little or no regard to the incidence of taxation, no state hesitates 
to use its funds for the construction of roads and bridges any- 
where within its confines, to provide hospital care and public 
health services, to care for the insane, ''to provide for the com- 
mon defense" through a state police force, to furnish higher edu- 
cational opportunities for those who can profit, and to perform 
other governmental functions that are state-wide in their oper- 
ations. The education of all children is the concern of all people 
within a state. No community lives in an economic vacuum. The 
principle of state participation in the cost of public education 
is generally accepted; the important point is the extent of its 
participation. 

Local Control of Education 

A state program of education in a sense is the composite 
of the educational programs in all of its political subdivisions. 
Its level of attainment is measured by the levels in the local 
school systems. It is essential for growth on a state-wide basis 
that there be growth locally. And that local growth is dependent 
in a large measure by the quality of local leadership. 

The essence of democracy is found in local communities. 
If people are able to settle their problems locally, they will be 
much better able to participate intelligently in the operations 
on a state and national level. The control of education should 
reside locally, but this does not mean that the financial burden 
has to be borne entirely by the local community. Our tax struc- 
ture is such that this is a financial impossibility. It is what 
people think locally in respect to education that determines the 
attitude of the state as a whole, and this attitude is largely 
dependent upon the leadership exerted by local educators. 

The key persons in any school program are the local educa- 
tional leaders. They are presumably well-trained and consecrated 
to their jobs. Despite critical comments to the contrary, the 
professionally-minded teacher is consecrated to his task. No 



Maryland State Department of Education 



13 



intelligent person enters the teaching profession for the money 
he will make nor for any personal preferment; he becomes a 
teacher because of an impelling desire to render some service to 
mankind. He believes firmly in the power and necessity of uni- 
versal education, and he attempts to inspire others with his 
belief. He holds firmly to his convictions despite the most devas- 
tating opposition, and he has plenty of it. There is no greater 
force than the example of one who believes strongly and faith- 
fully. 

Nor should the teacher hesitate, as the responsible educa- 
tional leader in his community, to speak boldly in advocacy of 
that in which he believes. It is but human to desire avoidance 
of conflict, but he must remember that he is not asking for 
something for himself. He is speaking in the interest of children. 
He is engaged in a great cause. Many have an abiding faith in 
the right thinking and ultimate wisdom of people in general, 
and opposition today may well become support tomorrow. 

Let there be no compromise with sound principles. The use 
of expediency merely "postpones the evil of the day thereof." 
One of the cleverest methods of opposition is to propose to take 
care of a situation ''temporarily." It is so easy to accept such a 
proposal; unfortunately, the temporary measure frequently 
becomes permanent and the children pay the penalty. 

The educator should never forget that public education is 
an expression of democracy, that the schools belong to the public. 
They are not operated for the benefit of administrators and 
teachers, but for children and the public. Therefore, it is essen- 
tial that the public be taken into the confidence of the school 
people, rather the public should participate in the operation of 
schools. This does not mean that the school should technically 
be run by the public but that there should be constant contact 
between it and the school. The public has a righj: to know what 
is going on and to be given a chance to participate in developing 
the program. Many times the public has been found to be 
thinking ahead of school people, ready and willing to take action 
when school people have been more timid. After all, school people 
are dealing with their children ; and who is more concerned with 
their welfare than their parents? 

Some thirty years ago in an editorial, Douglas Southall 
Freeman, an eminent Virginian, commented on the need in Vir- 
ginia for enlightened leadership. He wrote of various problems 
facing the State which needed vigorous, progressive thinking 
and action. He then asked where were the graduates of the 
colleges of the State, why were they not assuming the progressive 
leadership in social affairs that one would expect from those 
possessing their advantages and training. In the main, Dr. 
Freeman was pleading for broad vision and participation on the 
part of the educated. 



14 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



This editorial is called to mind when one is so unfortunate 
as to come into contact with a so-called educated practical busi- 
ness or professional man, so conservative in his theory of eco- 
nomics that he is always fighting for reduction in the cost of 
public education. It is wise to follow sound business practices, 
both personally and in the operation of pubHc affairs, but the 
greatest harm that can be done to business and the general wel- 
fare of the country is the pursuit of a parsimonious course in the 
support of universal education. It is exceedingly difficult to 
understand how any man can spend four years in a reputable 
college and then have any question in his mind as to the wisdom 
of strong support for public education and social betterment. 
If the colleges and universities do their job and instill in their 
students a moral and social responsibility, their graduates must 
of necessity stand for the things that make for a better life. 
They could not do otherwise and be true to their instruction. 

Today in every state there are thousands upon thousands 
of spiritual successors of Jefferson, truly educated in our institu- 
tions of higher learning, and able to "dream dreams and see 
visions." The great majority of such people, if properly informed 
and given the opportunity of participating in any program looking 
to the improvement of public education, will respond readily. 
Too often, the door of opportunity has been closed to them. They 
can constitute a tremendous force for the improvement of edu- 
cation and life in general. With them and all others who bear 
within themselves a love of their fellow men, ''Let us raise a 
standard to which the wise and the honest can repair. The rest 
is in the hands of God." 



Maryland State Department of Education 



15 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED BY THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 

January 1949 



Assessment Decrease or Abatement 22, 25, 26, 33 

Blind Persons 

Crossing at Intersection by Blind Pedestrians 32 

Public Assistance to Needy Blind....; 31 

Bond Authorization 

Anne Arundel 22 

Baltimore 22, 23 

Caroline 23 

Cecil 24 

Charles 24 

Dorchester 24 

Frederick 25 

Harford 25 

Kent 25 

Prince George's 26 

Queen Anne's 26 

Somerset 26 

Talbot 26 

Wicomico 27 

Worcester 27 

Cheltenham School for Boys 31 

Compensation of Employees — Allegany 22 

Composition of the Board of Education — Caroline 17, 23 

Condemnation of Land by County Board of Education 17 

Condemnation of School Property — Frederick 25 

Financing of School Bonds — Carroll 23 

Free Scholarships 

Conditions under Which Scholarships Are Awarded 20 

Johns Hopkins University 20 

Morgan State College 20 

General Construction Loan of 1949 29 

General Public School Assistance Loan of 1949 29 

General Public School Construction Loan of 1949 29 

Investment of Proceeds from Sale of Bonds — Allegany 22 

Maryland School for the Blind 30 

Merit System — Revision, Abolition, and Creation of Classifications 32 

Pensions for School Cafeteria Employees — Baltimore City 28 

Physically Handicapped Children's Education , 20 

Public Debt of Political Subdivisions 31 

Public Libraries 

Bethesda Public Library 19 

Pensions for Public Library Association Employees 33 

Washington County Free Library 19 

Regional Plan of Education — Southern States 30 

Rules and Regulations Approval by Attorney General 30 

St. Mary's Female Seminary 31 

Source and Distribution of Income 

Allocation of Motor Vehicle License Fees to Public School Funds 19 

Dates for Certification and Payment of State Aid and Allocation of 
Motor Vehicle License Fees for School Building Incentive Fund.. 20 
State Employees Retirement System 

Average Final Compensation, Voluntary Retirement after Thirty 

Years 32 

Prior Service Credit for Veterans of World War 1 33 

Retirement Benefits of Veterans of World War 1 33 



16 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



Subject Page 
State Retirement Systems 

Rights of Veterans of World War II 32 

Transfer between Retirement Systems 33 

Subversive Activities— The Ober Bill 33 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Creditable Service, Average Final Compensation, Service Retirement 

Benefit 17 

Special Pensions for Teachers with 25 years Service Prior to June 

1, 1927 18, 25, 27 

Supplementary Payments to Retired Teachers 31 

Allegany 22 

Anne Arundel and Carroll 18, 22, 23 

Caroline, Queen Anne's, and Talbot 19, 23, 26 

Frederick, Harford, and Kent 25, 26 

World War II Veterans' Exemption 18 

Transportation 

School Bus Registration Fees 32 

School Buses — Signals and Color of Bus 32 

Uniform System of Municipal Financial Reporting 31 

War Orphans' Aid 34 

Workmen's Compensation 

Average Weekly Wages 35 

Corporate Insurance 34 

Meeting Days of State Industrial Accident Commission 34 

Methods of Insurance.... 34 

Power and Procedure of Medical Board 34 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED BY THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 

Regular Session — January 1949 

Article 77 

Sec. 7-B — Caroline County — Composition of the Board of Education 

Chapter 526, House Bill 174 provides that the number of members 
composing the Caroline County Board of Education shall be increased 
from 3 to 5. 

Sec. 47 — Condemnation of Land by County Board of Education 

Chapter 439, Senate Bill 179, increases the amount of land which 
may be condemned by the County Board of Education for the site of 
a school building, for enlarging school-house lot, for playgrounds or 
other school purposes from ten to thirty acres. 

Sees. 95, 98, 99, 102 — Teachers' Retirement — Creditable Service, Average 
Final Compensation, Service Retirement Benefit 

Chapter 236, Senate Bill 268, makes the following provisions: 

1. Creditable Service. The Board of Trustees shall fix and determine 
^ by appropriate rules and regulations how much service in any year 

is equivalent to one year of service, but except as otherwise pro- 
vided, in no case shall more than one year of service be creditable 
for all service in one calendar year. The Board of Trustees, under 
such rules and regulations as it shall adopt, shall allow credit, how- 
ever, to members absent in the military service during World War I 
for the period of their absence, provided that such members were 
teachers when they entered such military service and within one 
year from the date of their discharge again became teachers. Service 
rendered for the regular school year in any district shall be equiva- 
lent to one year's service. 

2. Average Final Compensation. "Average final compensation" shall 
mean the average annual earnable compensation of a teacher for the 
ten consecutive years of service as a teacher during which his 
earnable compensation was highest, or if he had less than ten years 
of service, then his average earnable compensation for his total 
service. 

3. Service Retirement Benefit. Any member in service may retire upon 
written application to the Board of Trustees setting forth at what 
time, not less than 30 days nor more than 90 days subsequent to 
the execution and filing thereof, he desires to be retired, provided 
that the said member at the time so specified for his retirement 
shall have attained the age of 60 or shall have rendered 30 years 
of creditable service as a teacher and notwithstanding that, during 
such period of notification, he may have separated from service. 

Allowance for Service Retirement: 

Upon retirement for sei'vice a member shall receive a service re- 
tirement allowance which shall consist of: 

(a) An annuity which shall be the actuarial equivalent of his accumu- 
lated contributions at the time of retirement; and 

(b) A pension in addition to his annuity which shall be equal to one 
one-hundred and fortieth of his average final compensation multi- 
plied by the number of years of his service since he last became 
a member; and 

(c) If he has a prior service certificate in full force and effect, an 
additional pension which shall be equal to one-seventieth of his 
average final compensation multiplied by the number of years of 
service certified on his prior service certificate; 



18 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



(d) Provided, however, that if at the time of retirement the member 
has not attained the age of sixty, the pension and additional pen- 
sion, if any, shall be payable at retirement and shall be the actuarial 
equivalent at that time of a pension and additional pension pay- 
able at the age of sixty in the amounts computed as provided in 
(b) and (c) above; or, such member may elect at the time of re- 
tirement to have his service retirement allowance deferred to 
commence upon the attainment of the age of sixty, in which event 
the annuity shall be the actuarial equivalent of his accumulated 
contributions at that age, and the pension or pensions under (b) 
and (c) above shall be in the amounts computed as therein provided. 
4. Repayments or additions to the Annuity Savings Fund. In addition 
to the contributions deducted from compensation, any member may, 
subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees, redeposit in the 
Annuity Savings Fund by a single payment or by an increased rate 
of contribution, an amount equal to the total amount which he 
previously withdrew therefrom as provided in this sub-title; or 
any member may deposit therein by a single payment or by an 
increased rate of contribution an amount computed to be sufficient 
to purchase an additional annuity which, together with his prospec- 
tive retirement allowance, will provide for him a total retirement al- 
lowance of not to exceed one-half of his average final compensation at 
age 60 or after 30 years of creditable service, whichever would occur 
first. Such additional amounts so deposited shall become a part of 
his accumulated contributions except in the case of disability retire- 
ment, when they shall be treated as excess contributions returnable 
to the member in cash or as an annuity of equivalent actuarial 
value. The accumulated contributions of a member withdrawn by 
him or paid to his estate or to his designated beneficiary in event 
of his death as provided in this sub-title, shall be paid from the 
Annuity Savings Fund. Upon the retirement of a member his 
accumulated contributions shall be transferred from the Annuity 
Savings Fund to the Annuity Reserve Fund. 

Sec. 97 — Teachers' Retirement — World War II Veterans' Exemption 

Chapter 754, House Bill 683, provides that Veterans of World War 
II who are not eligible to become members of the Retirement System 
because of some physical disability which disqualifies them for member- 
ship and who have completed the courses of study required for teaching 
and have passed the required examinations, shall be eligible for teach- 
ing positions in the State, regardless of their ability to become mem- 
bers of the Retirement System. 

Sec. 97-A — Teachers' Retirement — Special Pensions for Teachers with 25 
Years of Service Prior to June 1, 1927 

Chapter 745, House Bill 584, provides that any person who shall 
have been a teacher in the public schools in this State, having the aggre- 
gate of 25 years or more of experience prior to June 1, 1927, and who in 
the case of Frederick and Caroline Counties shall have been a teacher 
for 20 years or more prior to June 1, 1927, and who in the case of 
Washington County shall have been a teacher or clerk or both, whether 
at the same time or at different times, for a period of 25 years or more 
prior to June 1. 1927, snd who- (1) shall be ineligible for a pension 
under this sub-title; and who (2) shall be at least 60 years of age; 
and (3) whose record as such teacher shall be without reproach; and 
who (4) shall be unable to teach school because of physical disability 
or infirmity; shall receive a pension of $720 a year, payable quarterly, 
from the County Commissioners of the county in which the teacher 
has taught. 

Sec. 103-A — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments to Retired 
Teachers in Anne Arundel and Carroll Counties 

Chapter 626, House Bill 678, authorizes the County Commissioners 
of Anne Arundel and Carroll Counties to pay to a teacher who is 



Maryland State Department of Education 



19 



retired and receives benefits less than $100 per month, an additional 
sum not to exceed $25 a month, provided, that the total amount re- 
ceived shall not exceed $100 per month. 
Sec. 103-A — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments to Retired 
Teachers in Caroline, Queen Anne's and Talbot Counties 

Chapter 640, House Bill 719, provides that any public school teacher 
in Caroline County v^ho is retired and receiving retirement benefits of 
less than $50 per month shall be paid an additional $20 per month by 
the County Commissioners of Caroline County, and further provides, 
that any public school teacher who is receiving an amount between 
$50 and $/o per month f-om the reti^^ement payments shall leceive 
an additional $15 per month from the County Commissioners. 

The law further provides that in Talbot and Queen Anne's Counties 
the additional payments shall be as follows: Teachers receiving less 
than $50 per month from retirement payments shall receive an addi- 
tional $25 per month under this section; all receiving between $50 and 
$75, an additional $20. 

Sec. 168 — Public Libraries — Bethesda Public Library 

Chapter 412, House Bill 652, amends Section 168 of Article 77 to 
provide that in Montgomery County, in the special taxing area in 
which the Bethesda Public Library is located, the option of joining 
the county library system may be exercised by the Board of Trustees 
of the Bethesda Public Library Association, Inc., upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Advisory Council of the said association. 

Sec. 181-A — Public Libraries — Washington County Free Library 

Chapter 703, House Bill 130, adds a new Section — 181-A — to Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1947 supplement. This new 
section permits the Washington County Free Library to share in the 
benefits under Section 167 (b) of this Article for the purchase of books 
for the Washington County Free Library provided the annual grants 
from the County Commissioners of Washington County and from the 
Mayor and Council of Hagerstown shall produce an aggregate annual 
income available for the support of said institution equal to or exceed- 
ing the financial standard as provided in Section 167 of this sub-title 
but the Washington County Free Library and the funds allocated to 
it hereunder shall be exempt from the supervision of the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools and the Division of Library Extension; and the 
qualifications of the employees of the Washington County Free Library 
shall be those which may be established by the Trustees of said Library; 
and the Washington County Free Library shall be the agency for the 
expenditure and administration of that portion of funds or materials 
received from the Federal Government for library purposes which may 
be allocated to the County Commissioners of Washington County by 
the State Board of Education, and the Washington County Free Library 
shall be exempt from the provisions of Section 170 to 178, inclusive, 
of this Article. 

Sec. 196 — Source and Distribution of Income — Allocation of Motor Vehicle 
License Fees to Public School Funds 

Chapter 458, Senate Bill 333, amends Section 196 of Article 77 
to clarify the manner in which a portion of the funds received by the 
County Commissioners for each county and the Mayor and City Council 
of Baltimore, from the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles on account 
of the license fees of motor vehicles, Classes A to J inclusive, shall 
be allocated to the credit of the public school funds of the counties 
and the City of Baltimore. The specific provision states "provided, 
further, that in any county, all funds which the county board of edu- 
cation and the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore may be authorized 
to expend for schools, other than State appropriations, and other than 
funds received by the County Commissioners of each county and the 
Mayor and City Council of Baltimore from the Commissioner of Motor 



20 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



Vehicles on account of the license fees on motor vehicles, Classes A 
to J, inclusive, as more particularly set forth hereinbelow, and exclusive 
of the amount authorized to be expended for debt service and capital 
outlay, may, for the purposes of the above proviso, be considered as 
levied by the Board of County Commissioners and by the Mayor and 
City Council of Baltimore, irrespective of the source or sources from 
w^hich such funds may be derived; provided, further, that the county 
commissioners of each county and the Mayor and City Council of 
Baltimore shall allocate and credit to the school funds of said county 
or the City of Baltimore the percentage of the amounts received from 
the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles on account of the license fees 
on motor vehicles. Classes A to J, inclusive, which the school tax rate 
in said county or in the City of Baltimore bears to the total county 
or Baltimore City tax rate." 

Sees. 198, 199 — Source and Distribution of Income — Dates for Certification 
and Payment of State Aid and Allocation of Motor Vehicle License 
Fees for School Building Incentive Fund 

Chapter 491, Senate Bill 448, amends Sections 198 and 199 of 
Article 77 to change the dates for certification and payment of State 
aid to the Treasurers of the county Boards of Education and the 
Mayor and City Council of Baltimore. The amendment provides that 
such certification shall be made on the bi-monthly rather than on 
the q\iarterly basis. According to the provisions of this amendment, 
the payments of State aid will be made during the months of August, 
October, December, February, April and June. 

This Act also provides for the payments to the State Department 
of Education in equal monthly instalments. 

The law further clarifies the existing provision relating to the 
allocation of registration fees for motor vehicles, classes A to J inclu- 
sive, toward the school building Incentive Fund. 

Sec. 229 — Physically Handicapped Children's Education 

Chapter 713, House Bill 294, amends Section 229 of Article 77 
which is the existing law concerning the education of physically handi- 
capped children. It changes from $200 to $400 the amount which may 
be paid by the State of Maryland toward the cost of teachers, special 
equipment, nursing, therapeutic treatment, and transportation for each 
such handicapped child. 

Sec. 253-A — Free Scholarships — Morgan State College 

Chapter 420, Senate Bill 12, includes Morgan State College among 
the institutions in the State receiving financial aid for free scholarships. 
The provisions of the law provide that "one student from each sena- 
torial district of the State shall be educated free of charge for tuition, 
room and board at Morgan State College, provided, however, that the 
value of any such scholarship may be divided between two or more 
students upon the approval of the college and the appointing author- 
ity." The appointments for such scholarships are to be made after a 
competitive examination according to the general procedure provided 
in the sub-title, "Free Scholarships." 

Sec. 253-A — Free Scholarships — Johns Hopkins University 

Chapter 447, Senate Bill 237, increases the number of free scholar- 
ships to Johns Hopkins University from 129 to 150. 

Sec. 254-A — Free Scholarships — Conditions under Which Scholarships Are 
Awarded 

Chapter 228, Senate Bill 234, provides that in establishing free 
State scholarships, "nothing herein contained shall in any way impaii 
or affect the control by any said university or school of its operation or 



Maryland State Department of Edi-cation 



21 



of any of the studies pursued therein, or impair or in any way affect 
the power to fix the standards of scholarship required for admission 
to the university or school or for the continued prosecution of studies 
therein, or the examination or other method of ascertaining or deter- 
mining such fitness in scholarship or otherwise, or the power to main- 
tain, prescribe and enforce the discipline, rules and regulations of the 
university or school." 



t 



22 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING INDIVIDUAL COUNTIES 

Allegany County — Investment of Proceeds from Sale of Bonds 

Chapter 187, House Bill 513, specifies how the County Com- 
missioners of Allegany County are authorized to invest the proceeds 
from the sale of bonds in the amount of $2,000,000 for school construc- 
tion authorized by Chapter 419 of the Acts of 1947. 

Allegany County — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments to 
Retired Teachers in Allegany County 

Chapter 267, Senate Bill 368, authorizes the County Commissioners 
of Allegany County to pay the sum of $25 per month or less to any for- 
mer public school teacher in Allegany County, who retires while teaching 
in the Allegany County school system, provided that such teachers are 
eligible to receive less than $150 per month and provided further that 
such supplemental payments shall not be greater than the amount 
required to raise the aforesaid regular annual retirement allowance 
to $150 per month. 

Allegany County — Compensation of Employees 

Chapter 530, House Bill 248, provides that the County Com- 
missioners shall set the salary, wages or compensation of every officer 
or employee of the County and shall set the amount to be allowed as 
office or other expenses for such officers and employees unless such 
salaries, compensation, wages or expenses are established by law. 

The law further provides that all such salaries and wages shall 
be established at least equal to the prevailing salaries and wages for 
comparable work in the community where performed. 

The law also provides that all officers and employees of the county 
who are hourly employees shall work on the basis of an 8-hour day 
and a 40-hour week. For any work performed in excess of 8 hours in 
any one day or in excess of 40 hours in any one week, they shall be 
paid at the rate of one and one-half times their normal wages or 
compensation. Such excess wages or compensation shall be computed 
on either a daily or weekly basis, whichever is greater. 

Anne Arundel County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 364, House Bill 421, provides that the money (short term 
notes) borrowed for public schools pursuant to the authority of 
Chapter 434 of the Acts of General Assembly of Maryland, 1947, may 
be refunded at maturity. 

Anne Arundel County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 391, House Bill 534, authorizes the Board of Education of 
Anne Arundel County to borrow an amount not to exceed $3,500,000 
for the construction, reconstruction, improvement, extension, alteration, 
repair, and modernization of public school buildings, including the 
purchase of sites for such schools.^ 

Each group of bonds shall be issued to mature in annual serial 
instalments over a period of 25 years from the date of issue; provided 
that the rate of interest shall not exceed 5 per cent per annum. 

Anne Arundel County — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments to 
Retired Teachers 

See Article 77, Section 103-A. 

Baltimore County — Assessment Decrease or Abatement 

See Article 81, Section 69. 
Baltimore County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 643, House Bill 729, provides that subject to the approval 
by the majority of the qualified voters at one or more referenda, the 



Maryland State Department of Education 



23 



County Commissioners of Baltimore County are authorized and em- 
powered to borrow an amount not to exceed $21,000,000 to finance the 
construction, acquisition, improvement or extension of public schools 
in the County. 

Each series or group of said bonds shall be issued to mature in 
annual serial instalments, the last instalment to mature not later than 
40 years from the date of issue of said group or series. Bonds of each 
issue shall bear interest at a rate not to exceed 5 per cent per annum. 

Baltimore County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 644, House Bill 730, provides that no debt shall be in- 
curred and no bonds shall be issued pursuant to the authority of this 
Act if, by such issuance, the total par value of said bonds plus the 
sum of the par value of all unpaid and outstanding bonds and the par 
value of all bonds of the County unissued but authorized, except bonds 
authorized or issued for the improvement of the Metropolitan District 
of Baltimore County shall exceed seven per centum (17c) of the then 
assessed value of all real and personal property subject to assessment 
for unlimited taxation by said County. 

The law further provides that on and after January 1, 1951, no 
debt shall be incurred and no bonds shall be issued pursuant to the 
authority of this law in any one fiscal year, except the refunding bonds 
which are authorized by Section 7 of this law, if the par value thereof 
exceeds an amount equal to one quarter of one per centum of the then 
assessed value of all real and personal property subject to assessment 
for unlimited taxation by said County, unless all the bonds so proposed 
to be issued shall have been previously approved by the majority of 
the qualified voters casting their ballots at a referendum thereon, duly 
called and held in accordance with the provisions of the law. 

Caroline County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 501, Senate Bill 499, authorizes and directs the Board of 
County Commissioners of Caroline County to borrow an amount which 
when added to other sums available from State or Federal funds shall 
aggregate $750,000 for the purpose of building new school buildings, 
the construction of additions to existing buildings or altering or repair- 
ing same and for equipping such new and existing school buildings. 

The law provides that any new bonds issued under the provisions 
of this law shall be of the serial type to mature not more than 20 
years from the date of issue. 

The law enumerates the specific locations at which any construc- 
tion or new facilities shall be added and the approximate amounts to 
be spent. 

Caroline County — Composition of the Board of Education 

See Article 77, Section 7-B. 

Caroline County — Teachers' Retirement — Special Pensions and Supple- 
mentary Payments to Retired Teachers 

See Article 77, Sections 97-A and 103-A. 

Carroll County — Financing of School Bonds 

Chapter 205, Senate Bill 92, provides that in the event certain 
"Sherbow moneys" which are earmarked for payment of interest and 
principal of school bonds are not needed in their entirety, the balance 
may be used for maintenance of public schools (Carroll County). 

Carroll County — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments to Re- 
tired Teachers 

See Article 77, Section 103-A. 



24 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



Cecil County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 641, House Bill 722, provides that the County Commission- 
ers of Cecil County are authorized and empowered to borrow an amount 
not to exceed $1,000,000 at a rate of interest not to exceed 3 per cent 
per annum for the purpose of erecting new school buildings, purchase 
of land for buildings, architect and other professional fees in connec- 
tion therewith, alterations or additions to existing school buildings and 
equipping school buildings. 

The law further provides that all moneys received from the State 
of Majyland under the provisions of Section 199C (Incentive Fund), 
of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1947 Supplement, 
shall be applied toward the payment of interest and redemption of 
said bonds. 

Charles County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 270, Senate Bill 375, authorizes the County Commissioners 
of Charles County to borrow an amount not to exceed $200,000 for the 
purpose of making additions, alterations and improvements to and for 
the purpose of equipping school buildings in Charles County in the 
following manner: 

Pomonkey High School Up to $100,000 

La Plata, Hughesville, Bel Alton, Glasva and 

Nanjemoy High Schools Up to $100,000 

The law further provides that all additions, alterations and im- 
provements shall be subject to the approval of a Building Committee, 
the names of whom are specifically named in the law. 

The law provides that said bonds shall be issued in such denomina- 
tions as may be determined by the County Commissioners and shall 
bear interest at a rate to be determined by the said Commissioners 
not in excess of 4% per annum. 

Dorchester County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 308, Senate Bill 515, authorizes the County Commissioners 
of Dorchester County to borrow an amount not to exceed $3,000,000 
for the purpose of erecting new school buildings, purchasing land for 
new school buildings, payment of architect's and other professional 
fees in connection therewith, alteration or repair of existing school 
buildings and equipping school buildings, or for matching Federal 
funds for such purposes. 

The law further provides that the first issue and sale of such 
bonds shall not exceed the amount of $1,300,000 and subsequent issues 
and sales shall be made in the amount of $1,700,000. 

The law further provides that of the new school buildings to be 
erected in accordance with provisions of this law, one shall be a new 
high school to be designated as the Northern Dorchester County High 
School, to be erected upon a site at or within a radius of one mile 
of Shiloh Corner; and another new school to be designated as the 
Southern Dorchester County High School, to be erected upon a site 
at or within a radius of two miles of the fork in the roads leading from 
Cambridge to Hooper's Island and from Cambridge to Crapo; and 
another of such new high schools shall be a high school to replace 
the F. D. St. Clair High School at Cambridge; and another of such 
new schools shall be erected to serve the high school needs in connection 
with the present Cambridge High School. 

The law further provides that these bonds shall bear a rate of 
interest not to exceed 47r per annum and that they shall mature over 
a period not to exceed 25 years. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



Frederick County — Condemnation of School Property 

Chapter 591, House Bill 586, provides that the Mayor and Alder- 
men of Frederick City are empowered to condemn the parcel of land, 
with appurtenances thereon, now known as the Frederick High School 
Grounds and owned by the Board of Education of Frederick County, 
lying immediately adjacent to a stream known as Carroll Creek and 
those lands now owned by the Mayor and Aldermen of Frederick. The 
land herein authorized to be condemned shall not exceed 60 feet in 
width and 1.160 feet in length of the 33 acre parcel of land acquired 
by the Board of Education on November 16, 1938. 

Frederick County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 652, House Bill 752, provides that the County Commission- 
ers of Frederick County may borrow an amount not to exceed $2,500,000 
in order to provide funds for the purpose of making additions or altera- 
tions to existing school buildings, to purchase land and erect thereon 
new school buildings, to purchase new equipment for existing and 
newly-constructed schools and to pay architects' and other professional 
fees in connection with such construction. 

These bonds shall be of the serial type and bear an interest rate 
not to exceed 4 per cent per annum and shall mature in not exceeding 
25 yeai's from date of issue. 

Frederick County — Teachers' Retirement — Special Pensions for Teachers 
with 25 Years of Service Prior to June 1, 1927 

See Article 77, Section 97-A. 

Frederick County — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments to Re- 
tired Teachers in Frederick, Harford, and Kent Counties 

Chapter 697, Senate Bill 494, empowers the County Commissioners 
of Frederick, Harford and Kent Counties to pay to each teacher of said 
counties who has been retired on a pension and receives less than $100 
per month, an additional $25 per month, but in no event shall pay- 
ments be made to any teacher which will make the payments more 
than $100 per month. 

Harford County — Assessment Decrease or Abatement 

See Article 81, Section 69. 

Harford County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 632, House Bill 689, provides that the County Commis- 
sioners of Harford County are authorized and empowered to borrow 
a sum not to exceed $1,500,000 for the purpose of erecting new school 
buildings, purchase of land for buildings, architect and other profes- 
sional fees, alterations to existing school buildings and equipping school 
buildings. 

The law further provides that the rate of interest shall not exceed 
5% per year. 

Harford County — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments to Re- 
tired Teachers 

See Chapter 697, Senate Bill 494, under Frederick County. 

Kent County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 399, House Bill 578, authorizes the County Commissioners 
of Kent County to borrow an amount not to exceed $500,000 for the 
purpose of erecting new school buildings, purchase of land for said 
buildings, architect and other professional fees in connection with 
said buildings, repairs, maintenance and alterations of existing school 
buildings and equipping school buildings in Kent County. 



26 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



The law further provides that the County Commissioners of Kent 
County shall apply toward the payment of the interest and redemption 
of said bonds all moneys over $12,000 per year, or as much thereof 
over $12,000 per year as needed, which shall have been received from 
the State of Maryland under the provisions of Section 199C of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1947 Supplement. 

Kent County — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments to Retired 
Teachers 

See Chapter 697, Senate Bill 494, under Frederick County. 

Montgomery County — Assessment Decrease or Abatement 

See Article 81, Section 69. 

Prince George's County — Assessment Decrease or Abatement 
See Article 81, Section 69. 

Prince George's County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 600, House Bill 620, authorizes the Board of Education 
of Prince George's County and the Board of County Commissioners of 
Prince George's County to borrow an amount not to exceed $10,650,000 
to build and equip new schoolhouses or construct an addition or addi- 
tions to existing schoolhouses, including the purchase of land, if 
necessary, or to match Federal funds for the aforesaid purposes. 

These bonds shall be issued on the serial maturity plan, over a 
period not to exceed 25 years from the date of issue, and the rate 
of interest shall not exceed 5% per annum. 

Queen Anne's County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 288, Senate Bill 455, authorizes the County Commissioners 
of Queen Anne's County to borrow an amount not to exceed $500,000 
for the purpose of making additions or alterations to existing school 
buildings, to purchase land and erect thereon new schools, to purchase 
new equipment for existing and newly-constructed schools and to pay 
aichitects' and other professional fees in connection with such con- 
struction. Such bonds shall be of the serial type, either registered or 
coupon, and issued in such denominations and at such rate of interest, 
not to exceed 4% payable semi-annually, as shall be determined by 
the County Commissioners and shall mature in not exceeding 25 years 
from date of issue. 

Queen Anne's County — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments 
to Retired Teachers 

See Article 77, Section 103-A. 

Somerset County — Admissions and Amusement Tax 

See Article 81, Sections 338-47. 

Somerset County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 698, Senate Bill 527, creates a school building fund for 
Somerset County, defining the sources of the money to be paid into 
such fund and relating to the general expenditure of the moneys in 
said fund. The law directs the County Commissioners of Somerset 
County to borrow for said county, under the provisions of Chapter 488, 
Senate Bill 442, as passed by the General Assembly at its Regular 
Session of 1949, the sum of $875,000, and a larger sum if possible, or 
so much thereof as may be possible under the provisions of said law. 
The law also directs the County Commissioners to place in the school 
building fund any and all moneys received by virtue of the provisions 
of Chapter 502, Senate Bill 518, as passed by the General Assembly 
at its Regular Session of 1949. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



It further provides that there shall be placed in the said school 
building fund any and all moneys payable to or to be received by 
Somerset County or any municipal corporation therein, under applicable 
provisions of State law relating to the income tax, the tax on racing, 
the recordation tax, the tax on amusements, the license tax, and the 
Incentive Fund for school buildings. 

The law enumerates the specific building projects and the approxi- 
mate costs thereof where the total amount of said school building fund 
amounting to approximately $1,085,000 shall be expended. 

The law further provides that no part of the moneys covered by 
the provisions of the law shall be expended or pledged without the 
prior approval of the School Building Committee of Somerset County 
composed of 12 citizens who are specifically named in the law. 

Talbot County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 605, House Bill 631, provides that the County Commis- 
sioners of Talbot County are authorized and empowered to borrow an 
amount not to exceed $250,000 in order to provide funds for the purpose 
of making additions or alterations to existing school buildings, to 
purchase land and erect thereon new school building, to purchase new 
equipment for existing and newly-constructed school buildings and 
to pay architect and other professional fees in connection with such 
construction. The law further provides that said bonds shall be of 
the serial type, issued at a rate of interest not to exceed 4 per cent 
per annum, payable semi-annually and maturing over a period not 
to exceed 25 years from the date of issue. 

The law further provides that all moneys received under the School 
Construction Incentive Fund Plan, established by Section 199C of 
Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1947 Supplement, shall 
be applied to the payment of the interest and redemption of said bonds. 

Talbot County — Teachers* Retirement — Supplementary Payments to Re- 
tired Teachers 

See Article 77, Section 103-A. 

Washington County — Teachers* Retirement — Special Pensions for Teachers 
with 25 Years of Service Prior to June 1, 1927 
See Article 77, Section 97-A. 

Wicomico County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 293, Senate Bill 464, provides for school building loan of 
$1,200,000 for the purpose of construction, completing the construction 
or aiding in construction, making additions and improvements to and 
equipping school buildings on sites now ovmed or which may be 
acquired by the Board of Education. The law refers specifically to 
two proposed schqol buildings in or near the limits of the City of 
Salisbury. 

The law further provides that these bonds shall bear a rate of 
interest not to exceed 6% per annum and that they shall mature over 
a period not to exceed 25 years from the date of issue. 

, Worcester County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 398, House Bill 567, provides that the Board of County 
Commissioners of Worcester County may borrow up to $1,500,000 upon 
the request of the Board of Education of Worcester County for building 
and equipping new schools, or constructing additions to existing schools, 
for equipping the same, or repairing existing schools, or purchasing 
sites for school buildings, or to match Federal funds for any of the 
aforesaid purposes. 

The law further provides that these bonds shall be issued on a 
serial maturity plan over a period of 25 years from the date of issue. 



28 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



Baltimore City — Pensions for School Cafeteria Employees 

Chapter 192, Senate Bill 132, adds a new paragraph (22A) to Sec- 
tion 6 of Article 4 of the Code of Public Local Laws of Maryland and 
the Baltimore City Charter (1946 Edition), authorizing the Mayor and 
City Council of Baltimore to grant to any and all persons regularly 
■ employed in, or associated with, any cafeteria system or department 
operated in connection with the public school system of said munici- 
pality, such of the benefits and advantages of the Employees' Retire- 
ment System of the City of Baltimore as said municipality may pro- 
vide by ordinance; specifying credit for service rendered prior to 
January 1, 1926 and for one-half of all service rendered between Janu- 
ary 1, 1926 and the date of admission to the Employees' Retirement 
System, providing that said persons who shall become employed in, 
or associated with any such cafeteria system or department after the 
passage of said ordinance shall submit to a medical examination before 
becoming a member of said Employees' Retirement System. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



GENERAL LEGISLATION* 

General Construction Loan of 1949— $16,373,000 

Chapter 277, Senate Bill 411, authorizes the creation of a State 
debt in the amount of $16,373,000 to be used for certain necessary 
building-, construction, deferred maintenance, and equipment purposes 
of the State, and for acquiring certain land. 

Among the specific projects listed in the law are: Frostburg State 
Teachers College, $275,000; Salisbury State Teachers College, $345,000; 
Bowie State Teachers College, $750,000; Towson State Teachers Col- 
lege, $1,026,000; Morgan State College, $1,669,170; University of Mary- 
land, $5,061,500. 

General Public School Assistance Loan of 1949— $20,000,000 

Chapter 502, Senate Bill 518, authorizes the creation of a State 
debt in the aggregate amount of $20,000,000, the proceeds thereof to 
be used to supplement the financing of the construction of, public school 
buildings and public school facilities and the acquisition of such real 
estate or interest in lands as may be necessary in connection therewith 
for each of the counties of the State and the Mayor and City Council 
of Baltimore. This law provides for a grant of financial assistance 
to each of the counties and the City of Baltimore with no obligation 
on the part of any said counties or the City of Baltimore receiving 
assistance to repay the amount of such grant at any time. Th^^ erant 
of financial assistance to each of the counties and the City of Balti- 
more will be made upon a matching basis. The requirement of a 
matching basis as provided in the law can be satisfied by the granting 
of $1.00 from the State grant fund ($20,000,000) for each $3.00 avail- 
able to and dedicated by each of the counties and the City of Baltimore 
for the purpose of financing public school buildings, public school 
facilities, and the purchase of public school land. The maximum grant 
of financial assistance to each of the counties and the City of Baltimore 
shall be the amount equal to $60.00 multiplied by the number of pupils 
enrolled in the schools in said counties or the City of Baltimore in the 
month having the highest average pupil enrollment in the school year 
in which the financial assistance is requested. 

General Public School Construction Loan of 1949— $50,000,000 

Chapter 488, Senate Bill 442, authorizes the creation of a State 
debt in the aggregate amount of $50,000,000, the proceeds thereof to 
be used to supplement the financing of the construction of public 
school buildings and public school facilities and the acquisition of such 
real estate or interest in lands as may be necessary in connection 
therewith for each of the counties of the State and the Mayor and 
City Council of Baltimore. The amount which can be borrowed by any 
county or the City of Baltimore will be determined on the basis of the 
amount of State debt which can be serviced at prevailing debt service 
costs by the amount allocable to each of the counties and the City of 
Baltimore from the State's share of the Incentive Fund and 90 per 
cent of the total funds distributed to said counties or to the City of 
Baltimore, as the case may be, under applicable provisions of State law 
relating to the income tax, the tax on racing, the recordation tax, the 
tax on amusements, and the license tax. The law further provides that 
before such loans can be made the State Board of Education shall, at 
the request of the Board of Public Works, determine a priority of need 
for school buildings as between any county and the State or as between 
any county in the State and the City of Baltimore. 

All claims for financial assistance under provisions of this law 
must be ratified and approved by the Board of Public Works. The law 
further provides that each of the counties and the City of Baltimore 
whose request for financial assistance has been allowed, shall execute 
and acknowledge in a manner according to law, an agreement which 



* Listed by Article and Section except in those instances where Article and Section are not 
designated in the Maryland Code. 



30 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



shall specify that (1) the amount of financial assistance allowed shall 
be repaid with interest and carrying charges within 15 years from 
date of signing of said agreement; (2) a sufficient annual levy on the 
taxable basis shall be made to repay in annual instalments the amount 
of financial assistance granted, together with interest and carrying 
charges, within 15 years from date of signing of the agreement; (3) the 
State Comptroller shall be authorized and empowered to withhold 
amounts due to the State under such agreement, any and all funds 
allocable to the counties and to the City of Baltimore under the pro- 
visions of State Law relating to the income tax, the tax on racing, 
the recordation tax, the tax on amusements, the incentive fund for 
school buildings and the license tax in each and every year that said 
County or the City of Baltimore has defaulted in any payment; and 
(4) such other terms and conditions as may be required by regulation 
of the State Board of Education, and approved by the Board of 
Public Works. 

Maryland School for the Blind 

Chapter 683, Senate Bill 380, creates a State debt of $350,000 for 
the construction and equipment of a building on its premises for the 
colored deaf and blind. 

Regional Plan of Education — Southern States 

Chapter 282, Senate Bill 432, ratifies The Regional Compact of 

14 Southern States for the establishment and creation of a joint 
agency, known as the Board of Control for Southern Regional Educa- 
tion, the members of which Board shall consist of the Governor of each 
State, ex officio, and three additional citizens of each State to be ap- 
pointed by the Governor thereof, at least one of whom shall be selected 
from the field of education. The duties of this Board shall be to submit 
plans and recommendations to the States from time to time for their 
approval and adoption by appropriate legislative action for the develop- 
ment, establishment, acquisition, operation and maintenance of educa- 
tional schools and institutions within the geographical limits of the 
regional area of the States, of such character and type and for such 
educational purposes, professional, technological, scientific, literary, or 
otherwise, as they may deem and determine to be proper, necessary 
or advisable. 

In addition, the Board shall have the power to enter into such agree- 
ments and arrangements with any of the States and the educational 
institutions or agencies as may be required in the judgment of the 
Board to provide adequate services and facilities for the graduate, 
professional and technical education for the benefit of the citizens of 
the respective States residing within the region, and such additional 
and general power and authority as may be vested in the Board from 
time to time by legislative enactment of the said States. 

Rules and Regulations Approval by Attorney General 

Chapter 738, House Bill 522, provides that prior to the adoption 
of any rule or regulation by the departments of the State (other than 
the Legislative or Judicial) a copy of the rule or regulation must be 
submitted to the Attorney General for approval as to its legality. 

Copies of the rule or regulation are also to be filed with the Clerk 
of the Court of Appeals, with the Secretary of State and with the 
Department of Legislative Reference. 

Rules and regulations thus filed shall be admissable as evidence 
in any court proceeding upon certification of the Clerk of the Court 
of Appeals. 

The Secretary of the State shall have printed all such rules and 
regulations submitted to him for distribution to the departments of 
the State and for sale to the general public. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



St. Mary's Female Seminary 

Chapter 676, Senate Bill 255, authorizes the change of the name 
of St. Mary's Female Seminary to St. Mary's Seminary Junior College. 

Art. 19 — Sees. 52-6, 58 — Uniform System of Municipal Financial Reporting 

Chapter 492, Senate Bill 449, provides that "each county and each 
incorporated city or town and taxing district within this State selecting 
the calendar year as its period for reporting fiscal transactions shall 
on or before January 1, 1950, adopt and maintain the uniform system 
of financial reporting established for its grade by the Maryland Com- 
mission on Uniform Accounts." Each county and each incorporated 
city or town and taxing district within this State selecting the period 
beginning with July 1 and ending with June 30 as its period for report- 
ing fiscal transactions, shall, on or before July 1, 1950, adopt and 
maintain the uniform system of financial reporting established for its 
grade by the Maryland Commission on Uniform Accounts. 

The law further provides that each county or incorporated city 
or town and taxing district shall, within 90 days after the close of 
the fiscal year selected by it, as provided by Section 49 of this Article, 
file with the State Comptroller and with the Director of the State 
Fiscal Research Bureau, its financial report covering the full period 
of each such fiscal year. 

The law further provides that after adoption of this system of finan- 
cial reporting, each county, incorporated city or town and taxing district 
having a population of 2,500 persons or more, as deteimined by the 
most recent Federal Census, shall have its books, accounts, records 
and reports examined at least once during each calendar year by the 
persons and for the purposes specified in this law. Said examinations 
may be made by any one of the following persons or agencies at the 
election of the county, incorporated city or town and taxing district 
whose books, accounts and records are subject to audit: (1) the State 
Auditor, with the aid of the Deputy State Auditor and the Assistant 
State Auditors: (2) a certified public accountant; or (3) the Fiscal or 
Auditing Committee of each such county, incorporated city or town 
and taxing district provided that the said Fiscal or Auditing Committee 
shall be approved by the State Auditor. 

Art. 25 — Sec. 20 — Teachers' Retirement — Supplementary Payments to Re- 
tired Teachers 

Chapter 667, House Bill 787, authorizes the County Commissioners 
of the several counties to pay any school teacher of their county who 
is retired and receiving retirement benefits under the provisions of 
other laws in the aggregate of less than $100 per month, an additional 
amount of not more than $25 a month upon application to the said 
County Commissioners. The total benefits to any one such teacher 
shall not exceed $100 per month. 

Art. 27— Sec. 696 — Cheltenham School for Boys 

Chapter 692, Senate Bill 450, authorizes the change of the name 
of Cheltenham School for Boys to Boys' Village of Maryland. 

Art. 30 — Sec. 16 — Blind Persons — Public Assistance to Needy Blind 

Chapter 699, House Bill 37, amends Section 16 of Article 30 of 
the Annotated Code of Maryland (1947 Supplement) to include an 
allowance for nursing or other special types of care, as provided by 
rule and regulation of the State Department. 

Art. 31— Sec. 20— Public Debt of Political Subdivisions 

Chapter 578, House Bill 532, extends from June 1, 1949, to June 1, 
1951 the time during which bonds may be issued for public works by 
political subdivisions of the State. 



32 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



Art. 64-A— Sec. 16-A — Merit System — Revision, Abolition, and Creation of 
Classifications 

Chapter 274, Senate Bill 394, provides that in all cases in vv^hich 
the State Employees Standard Salary Board shall recommend the re- 
vision or abolition of existing classifications or the creation of new 
classifications of positions, it shall be incumbent upon the Commissioner 
of State Employment and Registration to make a study of such recom- 
mendations and with the approval of the Governor in either case, to 
adopt or reject them within sixty days after the submission thereof 
to him. 

Art. 65 — Sec. 96 — State Retirement Systems — Rights of Veterans of World 
War II 

Chapter 238, Senate Bill 270, provides that members of retirement 
systems, including Teachers' Retirement System of the State of Mary- 
land, who have been absent in military service and have withdrawn 
any part of their accumulated contributions shall be entitled to repay 
such sums withdrawn into the pension or retirement system, with regu- 
lar interest thereon to the date of repayment and, if otherwise qualified, 
be entitled to benefits of this law as if such withdrawal had not been 
made. 

Art. 66 Vz — Sec. 74 — Transportation — School Bus Registration Fees 

Chapter 387, House Bill 505, provides that school buses, publicly 
or privately owned, under contract of the Boards of Education of the 
political subdivisions, and/or owned or under contract by accredited 
schools, shall pay a flat registration fee of $15 when operating for the 
purpose of transporting pupils between home and school, between 
designated points of collection and school, or to or from any school 
activity. When operating for these purposes and for these purposes 
alone they shall carry the usual school bus insignia, front and rear, 
and ''stop" signals, front and rear. When operating a school bus for 
any purpose other than those above set forth, the owner shall take out 
an additional license plate for which the charge shall be $30 per year. 

Art. 66 Vz — Sec. 141 -A — Blind Persons — Crossing at Intersections by Blind 
Pedestrians 

Chapter 138, House Bill 98, amends Article 661/2, Section 141-A, 
to add the alternatives of "a chrome, nickel, aluminum, or reflecting 
or shining metal cane, or if he is accompanied by a guide dog" to the 
conditions under which a blind or partially blind person may have the 
right of way at any street or road crossing or intersection where traffic 
is not regulated by a traffic officer or traffic control signals. 

Art. 661/2 — Sec. 200 — Transportation — School Buses — Signals and Color of 
Bus 

Chapter 444, Senate Bill 223, provides for the change of the color 
of school buses from orange and black to national school bus chrome 
and to equipping each bus with two rotary or flashing type red stop 
lights, both of which shall be affixed to the top of the bus on the front 
and rear, respectively. The change in color applies only to new school 
bus equipment purchased on and after September 1, 1949. 

The law also provides that such lights shall be lighted and operating 
at all times while said buses are loading or discharging school children 
but at no other time. 

Art. 73-B — Sees. 1, 7, 10 — State Employees Retirement System — Average 
Final Compensation, Voluntary Retirement after 30 Years 

Chapter 237, Senate Bill 269, provides for the same average final 
compensation and retirement benefits as are provided under Chapter 
236, Senate Bill 268, for the Teachers' Retirement System. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



Art. 73-B — Sec. 5 — State Employees Retirement System — Prior Service 
Credit for Veterans of World War I 

Chapter 235, Senate Bill 267, authorizes the Board of Trustees under 
such rules and regulations as it shall adopt, to allow credit to members 
absent in the military service during World War I for the period of 
their absence, provided such members were employees when they 
entered such military service and within one year from the date of 
their discharge again became employees. 

Art. 73-B — Sec. 6 — State Employees Retirement System — Retirement Bene- 
fits of Veterans of World War I 

Chapter 111, Senate Bill 248, provides that the same credits shall 
be allowed members of Employees Retirement System who served in 
World War I as those allowed members who served in World War II, 
provided that application for such prior service credit is made prior 
to January 1, 1950. 

Art. 73-B — Sec. 17 — Public Libraries — Pensions for Public Library Associ- 
ation Employees 

Chapter 615, House Bill 653, adds public library association em- 
ployees and the employees of any Board or Commission created by an 
Act of General Assembly for public purpose and not for the profit of any 
private person or corporation to the list of employees of municipal 
corporations eligible for pension. 

Art. 73-B— Sees. 26, 28— State Retirement Systems— Transfer between Re- 
tirement Systems 

Chanter 248, Senate Bill 315, makes it possible for an individual 
to transfer from one Retirement System to another without loss of 
prior service in the system from which he is transferred. Such mem- 
bership service credit shall be equal to the sum of the credits for 
(1) service credited as prior service in the system from which he is 
transferring if such prior service was rendered subsequent to January 
1, 1926, and prior to the establishment of the system from which he 
is transferring, and (2) service rendered since January 1, 1926, for 
which he was entitled to membership credit in the system from which 
he is transferring if such sum is greater than the membership service 
credit for all continuous service since January 1, 1926. 

Art. 81 — Sec. 69 — Assessment Decrease or Abatement 

' Chapter 782. House Bill 432, amends Article 81, Section 69. to per- 
mit the Appeal Tax Court in Baltimore and Montgomery Counties and 
the County Commissioners in Prince George's and Harford Counties, 
by an order in writing signed by a majority of the members and 
approved in writing by the Supervisor of Assessments of the County, 
and by the Tjeasuver of the County (in Montgomery County the 
Director of the Department of Finance), to decrease or abate an assess- 
ment after the date of finality in order to correct erroneous and im- 
proper assessments and to prevent injustice provided that the reasons 
for such decrease or abatement shall be clearly set forth in such order. 

Art. 81 — Sees. 338-47 — Admissions and Amusement Tax 

Chapter 255, Senate Bill 339, provides for the revision and re- 
codification of the tax on admissions and amusements. It further pro- 
vides that the amounts of the proceeds of the taxes paid to the County 
Treasurer of Somerset County shall, with the approval of the County 
Commissioners, be used by the Somerset County Board of Education 
for the construction, alteration, modification, maintenance and operation 
of schools and school buildings in Somerset County. 

Art. 85-A— Subversive Activities— The Ober Bill 

Chapter 86, Senate Bill 135, was designed to implement the recent 
amendment to the Constitution of Maryland, outlawing Communism. 
The law defines sedition as used in this connection and provides for 



34 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



the enforcement of the law. A Special Assistant Attorney General in 
charge of subversive activities is charged v^^ith the responsibility of 
assembling, arranging and delivering to the States Attorney of any 
county or of the City of Baltimore, together v^ith a list of necessary 
w^itnesses, for presentation to the next Grand Jury, such information 
and evidence of matters within said county or Baltimore City which 
have come to his attention, relating in any manner to the acts pro- 
hibited by the law and relating generally to the purposes, processes 
and activities of Communism and any other or related subversive or- 
ganizations, associations, groups or persons. 

The law also requires persons presently employed or eligible for em- 
ployment in or appointment to any office or in position of trust or profit 
in the Government or administration of the business of the State, 
or any county, municipality or other political subdivision of the State, 
to make a written statement of loyalty, stating that he or she is not 
a subversive person as defined in the law. 

Art. 96>/2— Sec. 49— War Orphans' Aid 

Chapter 701, House Bill 104, provides that any child between the 
ages of 16 and 23 whose parent served in the Armed Forces of the 
United States and who was killed in action or died as a result of such 
service between December 7, 1941 and September 2, 1946, if such 
person was a resident of the State at the time of his induction, shall 
be entitled to receive an amount not to- exceed $300 per year from 
the State for tuition, matriculation fees, board, room rent, books and 
supplies at an educational or training institution at college grade or any 
other institution of higher learning or commercial training, a teachers 
college, a vocational school, or accredited military preparatory school 
if such beneficiary is preparing to enter the U. S. Military Academy 
at West Point, the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, or a U. S. 
Coast Guard Academy. 

Art. 101 — Sec. 4 — Workmen's Compensation — Meeting Days of State In- 
dustrial Accident Commission 

Chapter 258, Senate Bill 348, enumerates Saturday as one of the 
days when the State Industrial Accident Commission will not be in con- 
tinuous session and open for the transaction of business. 

Art. 101 — Sec. 15 — Workmen's Compensation — Methods of Insurance 

Chapter 463, Senate Bill 349, merely enumerates methods by which 
employers may furnish Compensation Insurance for their employees. 
It further spells out into law the disposition which is to be made of 
fines which may be levied against employers who fail or refuse to 
secure insurance as required by the Act. 

Art. 101 — Sees. 17, 18 — Workmen's Compensation — Corporate Insurance 

Chapter 462, Senate Bill 346, strengthens the Workmen's Compen- 
sation Law to require employers to carry Compensation Insurance on 
employees. Failure to comply with this provision of the law shall 
constitute a misdemeanor and guilty employers shall be subject to a 
fine of not less than $500 and not more than $5,000. 

Art. 101— Sec. 27 — Workmen's Compensation — Power and Procedure of 
Medical Board 

Chapter 464, Senate Bill 350, merely changes the old provisions 
whereby the majority of the Medical Board constitutes a quorum for 
hearing issues referred to the Board. Under the new provisions, any 
one member of the Medical Board shall have authority to hear any 
issues referred to said Board, and the determination thereof by any 
two members shall be deemed to be the determination thereof by 
the Board. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



Art. 101 — Sec. 67 — Workmen's Compensation — Average Weekly Wages 

Chapter 257, Senate Bill 347, provides that "Average weekly 
wages," for the purposes of this Act, shall be taken to mean the 
average weekly wages earned by an employee when working on full 
time, and shall include tips and the reasonable value of board, rent, 
housing, lodging or similar advantages received from an employer, and 
if any employee shall receive wages paid in part by his employer and 
in part by the United States under any veterans' benefit law enacted 
by Congress, the term "Average weekly wages" shall mean the total 
average weekly wages from both sources earned by such an employee 
when working on full time. 



36 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Discontinuance of Emergency Renewals of Teachers' Certificates 

At its meeting on August 2, 1948 the Board approved a recom- 
mendation of the local superintendents that emergency renewals 
of teachers' certificates be discontinued, as of the summer of 
1948, and that objective evidence of professional training and 
professional spirit be submitted for the renewal of these cer- 
tificates in accordance with the usual rules. 

Remuneration for Accreditation Specialists 

Upon the recommendation of the State Superintendent of 
Schools the Board, on December 2, 1948, adopted the following 
resolution in connection with the approval of nonpublic schools: 

Resolved : That specialists who visit nonpublic schools at the 
request of this Department or who serve in an advisory capacity 
with regard to such matters as entrance requirements, equip- 
ment, teacher preparation, or curriculum, shall be paid on a 
scale commensurate with the value of their services and time. 

Consultant for Building Needs at State Teachers Colleges 

On December 2, 1948 the Board approved the action of the 
State Superintendent to engage Dr. Roy L. West, President of 
the State Teachers College, Trenton, New Jersey, as a consultant 
to the State Department of Education and the Department of 
Public Improvement, to prepare an overall layout of the pro- 
posed building needs of the State teachers colleges. The Board 
had been notified earlier of the recommendations of the com- 
mittee appointed to study the building needs of the teachers 
colleges. This report was presented also to the State Planning 
Commission and to the State budget director. 

Staff Salaries 

On December 2, 1948 Dr. Pullen reported to the Board that 
the adjustment of staff salaries in the State Department of Edu- 
cation had been formally approved, as of November 1, 1948. 
Appreciation was expressed to the Standard Salary Board and 
to Governor Lane for their action in this matter. 

Proposed Legislation Concerning Teachers' Retirement 

At the meeting of the Board on December 2, 1948 the State 
Superintendent reported that the legislative program of the 
State Teachers' Association included a provision which would 
allow a member to retire after thirty years of service, with 
deferred retirement allowance. The proposed legislation pro- 
vided also that the average salary over the highest ten consecu- 
tive years be used in the calculation of the retirement payments, 
instead of the average salary for the last ten years' service. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



These proposals had been approved by the State Teachers' Re- 
tirement System and the Board added its approval. 

Standards for Nonpublic Academic Schools 

At its meeting on February 24, 1949 the Board approved 
the standards for nonpublic academic schools with a revision 
which eliminated the specific standards for the certification of 
teachers and substituted a general statement relative to their 
qualications. 

Revised Resolution Concerning Day Nurseries 

On February 24, 1949 the Board revised the resolution passed 
on April 15, 1948, relative to the use of the word "school" in the 
names of day nurseries and similar institutions. The resolution 
in its revised form reads as follows, the words ''or kindergarten" 
having been added : 

RESOLVED: That in the light of the Attorney General's 
opinion dated February 27, 1948, the State Board of Edu- 
cation shall consider that day nurseries or child care 
centers or similar institutions, however designated, where 
no specific educational program is given, are not nursery 
schools and therefore do not come under the provisions of 
Chapter 489 of the Acts of 1947, Section 14A of Article 77. 
Since the law gives the State Board of Education authority 
over educational institutions only, the Board shall exercise 
no jurisdiction over day nurseries and similar institutions, 
except that it shall not permit them to use the word 
"school" or "kindergarten" in tlieir names. 

Accreditation of State Teachers College at Towson 

At its meeting on May 25, 1949 Dr. Pullen reported to the 
Board that the State Teachers College at Towson had recently 
been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. The institution is now accredited by every 
agency which accredits schools of this kind in this area. 

Kindergarten Class in Campus School at 
State Teachers College at Towson 

On May 25, 1949 the Board approved the recommendation 
of the State Superintendent that Dr. Hawkins be permitted to 
schedule a kindergarten class in the campus school at Towson 
State Teachers College. The College prepares kindergarten 
teachers and needed the class for demonstration purposes. Such 
classes were conducted in the past. 

Training in Elementary Education 
for Certain College Graduates 

On May 25, 1949 the State Superintendent reported that, 
as authorized by the Board, he had worked out plans with the 
president of the State Teachers College at Towson to offer pro- 
fessional training in Elementary Education to certain liberal 



38 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



arts college graduates whom the county superintendents wish 
to assign to elementary school teaching. It was estimated that 
60 to 100 students would desire this training which is to be 
offered for a six-week period during the summer months. 

Education of Orphans of War Veterans 
The State Superintendent reported to the Board on May 25, 
1949 that the General Assembly at its recent meeting had passed 
an act providing a fund not to exceed $300 annually for certain 
fees and other costs at certain educational institutions for the 
orphans of war veterans ''who were killed in action or died as a 
result of such [military] service, between December 7, 1941, and 
September 2, 1946," inclusive. The Act provides that the State 
Board of Education shall set up rules and regulations for the 
administration of this Act and perform certain administrative 
duties in respect to the program. Upon recommendation of Dr. 
Pullen, the Board authorized him to prepare the said rules and 
regulations and to perform such other duties as may be necessary 
to carry out the provisions of the Act. 

Oath of Allegiance 
On May 25, 1949 Dr. Pullen reported to the Board that he 
had notified all local superintendents of schools, county librarians, 
Teachers College presidents, county boards of education, county 
library boards of trustees, and the staff of the State Department 
that all persons connected with the school system, the library 
system, etc., are required to take the oath of allegiance, as 
prescribed by the Anti-Subversive Act of 1949. He had also 
called attention to the fact that all new employees must be 
investigated as to their loyalty and must be required to take 
the oath. A copy of the pledge, as prescribed by the Attorney 
General, had been sent to all the administrators and Board mem- 
bers mentioned. Local boards of education, library boards of 
trustees, and members of the State Board of Education also are 
required to sign the oath. Copies were therefore given to the 
members of the Board and they attached their signatures. 

Housing in. the Mathieson Building 

On May 25, 1949 Dr. Pullen reported to the Board that all 
members of the Department were housed in the Mathieson Build- 
ing, with the exception of the Baltimore and Central Divisions 
of Vocational Rehabilitation, for which he hoped to obtain 
2,500 additional square feet within a short time. The Depart- 
ment, at the time, occupied offices on five floors. 

The Board directed the Superintendent to obtain the needed 
additional space to provide for a Board and conference room and 
also to house the rest of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

Board Members 

On December 2, 1948 the Board adopted a resolution regard- 
ing the resignation on October 8, 1948 and the death on Novem- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



ber 22, 1948 of Mr. Oscar Coblentz. Mr. Coblentz had served as 
a member of the State Board of Education since July 3, 1946. 
The Board welcomed as a new member Mrs. Curtis Walker of 
Montgomery County. On May 25, 1949 Dr. Tasker G. Lowndes 
was elected President of the State Board of Education for the 
year 1949-50 and Dr. Nicholas Orem was elected Vice-President. 

Personnel Notes 

On August 2, 1948 Dr. D. W. Zimmerman was appointed Di- 
rector of the Division of Finance and Research, effective August 
1, 1948. 

On December 2, 1948 Dr. Pullen received the approval of 
the Board to go to Paris and to Nurenburg, in his capacity as 
Chairman of the Commission for International Educational Re- 
construction and at the invitation of UNESO (United Nations 
Educational Scientific Cultural Organization). The purpose of 
the trip was to attend a conference on educational reconstruction 
in war devastated countries. According to the plans. Dr. Pullen 
was to leave for Europe on December 20 and to return after 
the conference in Paris on January 5. 

The Board at its meeting on December 2, 1948 approved an 
arrangement by which Mr. John J. Seidel would direct a survey 
of vocational education in the City of New York for the New 
York State Department of Education. This was considered a 
professional honor to both Mr. Seidel and the State Department 
of Education. 

On December 2, 1948 Miss Nettie B. Taylor was appointed 
Supervisor of Libraries, effective October 1, 1948. 

On April 11, 1949 Mr. Thomas D. Braun, Mr. Lionel Burgess, 
and Mr. W. Bird Terwilliger were appointed Supervisors in the 
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, effective July 1, 1949. 
These men had been in the Division for some years as Assistant 
Supervisors. 

On April 11, 1949 Dr. Marie Wheatley who had been Assis- 
tant Supervisor of Curriculum, was appointed Supervisor of Spe- 
cial Education, effective July 1, 1949. 

On May 25, 1949 Miss Geneva Faith Ely was appointed 
Assistant Supervisor, effective September 1, 1949, to carry on 
the editorial functions of the Department as well as to assist 
with such other professional duties as the accreditation of non- 
public schools and colleges. 

On May 25, 1949 the Board approved the transfer of Mr. 
James L. Reid from Supervisor of Surplus Property to Supervisor 
of Buildings. This full-time position was considered necessary 
in view of the extensive building program contemplated by the 
counties. 



40 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

The activities of the supervisory staff for the year were 
devoted largely to three major purposes: (1) Proper support of 
educational programs in our schools through provision of ade- 
quate and appropriate resources, both material and personnel; 
(2) the evaluation of the educational program; and (3) the 
further strengthening of the program of inservice teacher educa- 
tion. 

I. Provision of special resources adequate and appropriate to 
the developing program 

The Film Library begun during the previous year was 
strengthened and expanded. The Supervisor of Curriculum, 
working through the Division of Library Extension, estab- 
lished policies for the selection of films and for their dis- 
tribution and use by appropriate groups throughout the 
State. Since the Division did not want to trespass upon the 
responsibilities of counties and local schools for having these 
important resources readily available, it was agreed that 
audio-visual materials in the State Film Library should be 
purchased chiefly for use in the State's supervisory pro- 
grams and in the programs of adult groups and agencies with 
large interests in public education. Materials whose cost 
or infrequent use precluded their purchase locally might be 
supplied from the State Film Library for occasional use in 
the classroom or, preferably, in a total school situation. But 
this should remain an exceptional practice. 

In addition to county public school groups, the films 
w^ere used by colleges, adult nonschool groups, public librar- 
ies, and the State Department supervisors. In greatest 
demand were such films as Democjxicy, Finding Your Life 
Work, Guidance Problems for Home and School, Learning 
to Understand Children, and Maintaining Classroom Dis- 
cipline. 

Resource Mobilization Centers 

In line with this strongly felt need for promoting and 
facilitating the use of adequate resources, the Division 
began to shift its conception of the curriculum laboratories 
located at the State teachers colleges ^rom places where 
effective materials were housed to places serving as resource 
mobilization centers. They were to be used in effecting 
a closer coordination of agents and agencies which are active 
in shaping the curriculum. Specifically, members of the 
staff of the State Department of Education, of county staffs, 
of staffs of teacher-education institutions, of other State 
agencies with interests in education, of parent groups, and 
of other groups should be involved in the programs at 
these centers in clarifying purposes, concentrating efforts, 
and eliminating unnecessary overlappings and duplications. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



For the purposes of these programs most useful resources, 
material and personnel, could be drawn not only from the 
State teachers colleges but frpm_aiLStateJnstitutions which 
had personnel with special skills and insights to bring to the 
programs. The operation of the child study program had 
already given a limited demonstration of how these centers 
might^ be used for mobilizing and concentrating the rich 
and varied resources which the many institutions of the 
State have to offer. As the public schools of Maryland 
prepared to move in a carefully planned and systematic 
manner from the fourth year of child study to necessary 
curriculum changes and adaptations, these mobilization 
centers presented themselves as strategic facilities for ad- 
vancing the schools' language arts, fine arts, and physical 
arts programs. 

During this school year, the Division was concerned 
not only with the purchasing but also with the preparation 
of appropriate materials. The State Department of Educa- 
cation was envisioned as a clearing house and editorial cen- 
ter for the development of a source bulletin and a series 
of picture collections on the economic, domestic, educational, 
and recreational life in Maryland. The Supervisor of Cur- 
riculum was given the responsibility of initiating the project 
in each county. The total undertaking was to serve as a 
contribution to the improvement of living in the State. 

"Out-of-Doors Living" Program 

In the summer of 1948 the Division sponsored a pilot 
''out-of-doors living" program at the State Teachers College, 
Towson. In attendance were 90 children from the elementary 
schools in Baltimore County, 36 teachers from the various 
counties of the State, and 22 nurses (part time, a total of 
48). Dr. William Vinal, Director, Nature Guide School, Mas- 
sachusetts College for Training Outdoor Leaders, also par- 
ticipated. The total number of children was divided into 
small work groups, each of which carried on a project 
natural for children of this age. In the group to aid them 
*'to do better the desirable things they would like to do any- 
way" were a teacher counselor, a nurse, and, on occasion, 
the specialist in arts and crafts, nature lore, or science. In 
the late afternoons teachers and nurses attended seminar 
sessions conducted by professionally qualified persons in fields 
related to mental and physical health. The whole enterprise 
exemplified the finest type of general education program 
into which special resources, both material and personnel, 
were fed in a highly functional and useful manner. It was 
in a sense a pilot program for schools interested in the 
summer education of children who need kinds of experi- 
ences different from those possible within school w^alls. 
It contained also elements and suggestions for improving 



42 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



in-school programs, particularly as these express themselves 
in excursions, field trips, day camps, play programs, con- 
servation projects, and work experience opportunities. 

II. The evaluation program 

State-Wide Testing Program 

Members of the Division of Instruction, with the assist- 
ance of Dr. David W. Zimmerman of the Department and 
representatives of county administrations, prepared a re- 
vision of the State-wide testing program. Recommendations 
finally formulated included the following: 
Grade 1 — liee-Clark Reading Readiness Test 
Grade 3 — California Progressive Achievement Tests, Primary 
Battery, Form A 

New California Short-Form Test of Mental Matur- 
ity, Primary '47 S-Form 
Grade 6 — California Progressive Achievement Tests, Elemen- 
tary Battery, Form A 
Grade 9 — California Progressive Achievement Tests, Inter- 
mediate Battery, Form A 
New California Short-Form Test of Mental Matur- 
ity, Intermediate '47 S-Form 
Kuder Preference Record 
Grade 11 — California Progressive Achievement Tests, Ad- 
vanced Battery, Form A 
New California Short-Form Test of Mental Matur- 
ity, Advanced '47 S-Form 
Kuder Preference Record 
Grade 12 — General Educational Development Tests 

The plan constitutes the basic or minimum program for 
the State. The purpose is not to compare schools on the 
basis of achievement but to obtain comparable data on a 
State-wide basis as means of determining broad educational 
strategy as well as classroom tactics. On the basis of test 
results properly analyzed and evaluated, the school may get 
some insight into its relative success in teaching study 
skills and techniques of wide application, of building socially 
valuable concepts consistently and progressively, in provid- 
ing for individual differences, in identifying and meeting 
needs other than the purely academic, and in making use 
of the varied resources of school and community. The State 
may have data for the study of such problems as (1) rela- 
tionship between cultural environment and school success, 

(2) inservice teacher education and needs of children, 

(3) preservice teacher education and educational needs 
of children, (4) relative strengths and weaknesses of various 
types of curriculum organization. 

Second Annual Maryland Educational Conference 

It should be remembered, however, that data derived 
from standardized tests are riot sufficient for a full program 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



of evaluation. They may not catch or reflect the more in- 
tangible aspects of the program. They do not measure all the 
values which the schools should transmit and perpetuate. 
In recognition of this truth, the Division, with representa- 
tives from Baltimore City and the counties of the State, 
planned the Second Annual Maryland Educational Confer- 
ence. By identifying rather specifically the values which 
should be realized through public education, this conference 
took the first step toward the development of a comprehen- 
sive evaluation instrument. The work groups in the con- 
ference made their identification of values in relationship 
to seven essential functions or basic social responsibilities 
of the school: (1) Developing democratic beliefs, values, 
and practices; (2) developing ethical, moral, and spiritual 
values; (3) learning to adjust to life situations; (4) utilizing 
wisely human, natural, and material resources; (5) develop- 
ing sound habits of thinking; (6) appreciating and respond- 
ing to the beautiful; and (7) acquiring competence in the 
tools of learning. 

III. The inservice teacher education program 

Child Study 

The year 1948-49 was the fourth year of the State-wide 
program for child study. The Department continued to en- 
courage and support the programs in each of the counties 
by financing in part the services of consultants from the 
Institute for Child Study at the University of Maryland. 
A total of 2,133 teachers in white schools and 193 leaders 
participated in the various counties. In the Negro schools, 
559 teachers and 69 leaders took part. This contribution 
to the inservice education of teachers constituted the most 
important part of the total supervisory program in ele- 
mentary schools, and it continued to hold, potentially, even 
greater values for the high school teaching corps. This was 
true because secondary schools are feeling, even more keenly 
than are elementary schools, the complexities and problems 
involved in adapting content and method to the needs of 
"all the children of all the people." 

This year participants in the program, and even more 
particularly, members of county staffs and of the State 
Department of Education expressed a growing concern 
about the implications of child study for the curriculum. 
Many possibilities for making the transition from child 
study to curriculum adaptation were pointed out. Some 
suggested that each teacher or each group be encouraged 
to select its own curriculum problem; communication to 
parents, home visits, promotional practices, or teacher- 
pupil planning. Others said, ''Concentrate on how children 
learn, nutrition, or the slow learner." At the close of the 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



year the broad problem related to child study and curricu- 
lum remained, ''How could the teacher — now equipped with 
necessary information and insights and trained in the use 
of techniques and tools necessary in the understanding of 
the child and of the personal and cultural forces which shape 
his growth — proceed to provide educative programs revealed 
as imperative?" 

Pilot Programs 

This year marked also the beginnings of several pilot 
programs operated and financed jointly by State and county. 
The State Department of Education participated in a pilot 
program in nutrition in Prince George's County, and it 
shared also with Allegany County the planning and the 
attack upon a broad front of the program in health, physical 
education, and recreation with its ramifications into many 
subject fields and into most aspects of school life. Members 
of the Division of Instruction agreed that clearly formu- 
lated policies should govern such joint enterprises. The 
following were advanced tentatively for guidance in the 
immediate future: 

1. Pilot programs should be planned on an intercounty or re- 
gional basis. 

2. They should be centered preferably in the State teachers 
colleges, where curriculum laboratories as mobilization 
centers are now in process of development. 

3. The program should involve matters of wide interest and 
application. 

4. The counties involved should be responsible for establishing 
demonstration centers, which might serve broadly in the 
teacher education program of the region or State. 

5. The counties involved would take the initiative in planning 
such programs and working out details. Ultimately, they 
would take over completely the planning and financing. 

6. State and county agencies with interests in education, 
parents, and citizens generally, should be represented in 
the planning and evaluating of such programs. 

7. Pilot programs should be useful in demonstrating the 
natural transition from child study to curriculum adapta- 
tion. 

8. Interpretative materials emerging from the program should 
be available for State-wide distribution. 

State Supervisory Program 
Regularly scheduled visits to county schools and super- 
tendents' offices continued to be a part of the State's super- 
visory program. Analyses of organizational data and of 
the schedule for the daily program were made by the Super- 
visor of Colored Schools and by the Supervisor of High 
Schools. Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, following the retirement of 
Dr. E. Clarke Fontaine, assumed the responsibility for high 
school supervision on a State-wide basis. He carried on his 
work chiefly through conferences with groups of county 
supervisors and with individual supervisors. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



Mr. Paul E. Huffington, Supervisor of Colored Schools, 
made an impressive analysis of the situation in the colored 
schools relative to enrollments, teacher shortages, Hbrary 
and guidance services, music, physical education, business 
education, arts and crafts, home economics, agriculture, in- 
dustrial arts, and foreign language. Conclusions based upon 
this analysis gave direction to the supervisory program for 
the Negro schools for the remainder of the year. Un- 
doubtedly, it will continue to give such direction in the 
years immediately ahead. 

Special Education 

The programs in the State for handicapped children may 
appropriately be considered in terms of resources made available 
for meeting such special needs. Dr. M. Marie Wheatley, in May, 
1949, summarized for the Division changes and progress in the 
field of special education. 

Conservation of Hearing Program 

The program in conservation of hearing is set up in three 
areas : 

1. Case findings v^hich is the responsibility of the school. 

2. Medical diagnosis and follow-up which is the function 
of the Health Department. 

3. Education which is the responsibility of the Depart- 
ment of Education. 

The typical procedure for carrying out this program is as 
follows : 

1. Request by the county for clinic service. 

2. County superintendent and his staff meet with the 
representative of the Health Department to plan the 
program. They go over the record keeping. 

3. Each principal is informed of the program. 

4. The principal interprets the program to the teacher 
and provides equipment necessary for the audio- 
meter, etc. 

5. At the end of the day of the hearing the technician 
gives the teacher the records and two letters con- 
cerning the hearing conditions of each child. One of 
the letters is sent to the parents of the child and the 
other is kept in the school files. 

The chief problem in the hearing program is educational re- 
habilitation and follow-up. About three per cent of the popula- 
tion will have some hearing loss ; about one per cent will require 
a hearing aid. Children must be taught to use a hearing aid. 
In many of the special institutions the children are taught signs 
and not speech. If the handicapped child can be taught to adjust 



46 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



to the normal situation with other children without interrupting 
the normal procedure too much, he should not be segregated but 
kept in the regular classroom. The child should be treated first 
as a child, then as a child with a hearing loss. 

Attempts are being made to coordinate the school and health 
programs by having the public health nurse send a duplicate of 
the record of each child to the teacher after each clinical exami- 
nation and treatment. 

Visual Program 

The vision program operates in a way similar to that of 
the hearing program. Most of the case findings are done by the 
public health nurses or teachers. The Massachusetts Vision Kit 
can be used easily by the teachers and other laymen under super- 
vision. Unlike the audiometer, it does not require the services 
of a skilled technician. The medical treatment and follow-up are 
in charge of the Health Department. Five counties in Maryland 
have eye clinics. Outside of Baltimore City there are no educa- 
tional facilities for sight conservation classes. 

The following are urgent needs of the program: 

1. Provision for the partially-sighted children of school 
age. One out of 500 children needs special help. 
Treatment is not expensive and does not require par- 
ticular skill. Program consists primarily of finding 
the partially-sighted children and providing mate- 
rials for them. 

2. Nursery school for blind babies. Blindness has been 
increasing in babies during the last ten years, due 
probably to the fact that obstetricians are saving a 
larger number of premature babies. 

3. Trained social workers with school experience in 
every eye clinic 

Speech Programs 

In one county of the State the Health Department operates 
a hearing program with speech attached as a part of the main 
program. The children are taken out of school and go to the 
speech clinic one-half hour a week. 

In another county the speech program has operated as 
follows : the county has a supervisor of speech who has a broad 
educational background and splendid technical training. After 
studying his teachers and his children, he sent out to the teachers 
a bulletin in which he told them that they would be helped witli 
their speech problems. Defective speech was defined, speech dis- 
orders were described, and teachers were told how to ''spot" 
speech difficulties and to whom to refer the children. Another 
bulletin gave the results of the survey for speech difficulties. The 
teachers referred 800 children for treatment. The technician 
found that 790 actually needed help. A catalog of speech dis- 
orders was then sent to the teachers. Speech deviates were 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



divided into several groups — those that teachers or specialists 
could work with and those who could not be treated until some 
physical disorder was taken care of. A specialist gave a course 
on normal speech for the regular classroom teacher, and 24 
teachers in the county took the course. Each teacher was en- 
couraged to set up his own speech program. Countless pamphlets 
on proper classroom activities were distributed. 

Two counties have speech clinics, and two counties have em- 
ployed speech correctionists. 

Speech correction should be part of the training of every 
teacher. School nurses and doctors should be kept as resource 
persons. The technician or specialist must work with the teacher 
in the general education program. 

Home Teaching 

Home teaching is under the supervision of the pupil per- 
sonnel supervisor and the visiting teacher. The child is given 
two hours of instruction a week. The teacher receives $1.50 an 
hour as compensation. Two recommendations were: 

1. Raise the teacher's compensation to $2.00 or $2.50 
per hour to obtain more adequate service 

2. Have one or two full-time home teachers under the 
supervision of the general elementary or secondary 
supervisor. Use the supervisor of pupil personnel 
as an adviser. In this way, the level of home teaching 
might be raised. 

Program for Mentally Handicapped 

In Washington County there were this year four experi- 
mental groups of the mentally handicapped. The program is 
a transitional one until classes are reduced in size. In June, 1948, 
the County conducted a workshop consisting of 65 persons — the 
principals and the faculties of four schools. The workshop groups 
studied the problems pertaining to children with I.Q. below 50 
and the slow learners who were retarded two years academically. 
This year the County concentrated on the slow-learning group 
which was divided into four experimental classes after various 
tests had been given to the group; e.g., individual intelligence 
test, physical test, hearing and vision tests. The remedial teacher 
gave remedial help and coordinated her program with that of 
the regular teacher. 



48 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 
Certification 

No changes in certification requirements were made during 
the school year 1948-49. The work of this Division consisted in 
obtaining transcripts of records and evaluating them ; in issuing 
certificates to administrators, supervisors, and teachers in the 
public and nonpublic schools and in participating in interviews 
and conferences relative to certification. 

The volume of applicants from nonpublic schools during this 
school year was considerably larger than previously, because this 
was the first full year when nonpublic schools, with certain ex- 
ceptions, could operate only with the approval of the State 
Superintendent. Approximately twice as many certificates were 
issued to nonpublic school teachers in 1948-49 as during the pre- 
ceding year. 

The numbers of certificates of all kinds which were issued 
in 1948-49 may be found in TABLE 68. 

Accreditation 

The Division of Accreditation, with the help of members of 
other divisions in the Department and outside specialists, tried 
to visit and evaluate all the nonpublic schools by January 1, 1948. 
A few schools which for various reasons could not be surveyed 
by the beginning of the calendar year, were visited shortly after- 
wards. New schools also were evaluated. 

An additional member of the staff, who was appointed to 
work with the elementary schools, kindergartens, and nursery 
schools, visited all the institutions of these types which were on 
the approved list and investigated others which applied for 
accreditation. 

Academic Schools 

The number of nonpublic, academic schools approved during 
the school year 1948-49 was as follows: 

Number of Certificates 



School Issued Revoked 

Nursery 4 2 

Nursery-kindergarten 4 1 

Kindergarten 7 4 

Nursery-kindergarten-elementary 2 - 

Elementary - " 2 

Special 1 - 



The certificates revoked were held by schools which closed 
voluntarily because the directors concerned were no longer inter- 
ested or the premises occupied were no longer available. 

When initial visits were made in 1947-48 and 1948-49 to a 
number of organizations which were operating under various 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



names, such as nursery, nursery school, care center, play center, 
and play group, it was found that the institutions did not meet 
the requirements for standard nursery schools but were never- 
theless performing a needed function as child care centers. The 
Attorney General ruled that such organizations did not come 
under the jurisdiction of the State Superintendent, provided 
they refrained from using in their names words indicating that 
the institutions were offering educational programs. The State 
Board therefore passed a resolution forbidding such organiza- 
tions to use the word ''school" in their names but permitting 
them to continue their operations. The word ''kindergarten" was 
later included in the prohibition. 

During the school year 1948-49, fourteen institutions which 
applied for approval as nursery schools or kindergartens or ele- 
mentary schools were found not to qualify. The institutions 
which enrolled only preschool children were told that they might 
continue to function if they did not use the word "school" or 
"kindergarten" in their names. The others, which wished to 
operate elementary schools, were not permitted to open. 

Nonacademic Schools 

The number of nonpublic, nonacademic schools approved and 
the number of certificates of approval revoked during the school 
year 1948-49 were as follows : 



Type of Nimibei- of Certificates 

School or Curricuhim Issued Revoked 

Art 4 

Barber 1 

Beauty 1 3 

Building trades 4 - 

Business 3 2 

Correspondence 1 - 

Dance 35 - 

Electricity 1 

Fligrht - 1 

Internal combustion engines 3 - 

Music 9 

Navigation - 1 

Photography 1 1 

Plastics 1 1 

Printing 1 - 

Refiigeration & Air Conditioning 1 - 

Special education 1 

Tailoring 2 - 

Upholstering 2 - 

Watchmaking - 3 

Miscellaneous 3 - 



Special Surveys 

The State Superintendent made efi'ective use of specialists 
for advice about the approval of schools or courses in various 
fields. Examples of these activities follow. 

A professor of chemistry from Johns Hopkins University, 
one from Goucher College, and an industrial chemist reviewed 



50 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



a proposed correspondence course in chemistry and recommended 
its approval, but suggested changes in the chemicals which were 
to be supplied by the institutions. The school authorities agreed 
to make the proposed substitutions in order to lessen the proba- 
bility of injury to the students. 

A school of practical nursing which had been operating in 
Baltimore for some time applied in 1946 for approval for the 
training of veterans. A survey by a committee of various nurses' 
organizations resulted in an unfavorable report. Later, require- 
ments calling for a twelve-month course, about seven-eighths of 
which should consist of practical experience, were drawn up, 
and the attorney representing the school agreed that practical 
nursing experience should constitute a considerable part of the 
course, but the school failed to comply with the requirement. 
In a conference between representatives of the State Department 
of Education, the Attorney General's office, and the school, the 
fact was brought out that although the law prescribes require- 
ments for licensed practical nurses, a person who has had no 
training whatever may engage in such work. Since the school 
was not attempting to prepare licensed practical nurses, the 
State Superintendent agreed that he would have the school sur- 
veyed by another committee in the light of objectives which the 
school authorities would say they were attempting to meet. The 
second committtee reported unfavorably. The school appealed 
to the State Board of Education at the meeting held on May 25, 
1949, and obtained permission to continue operating for several 
months, pending completion of arrangements for hospital affili- 
ation. No further action was taken during the school year of 
1948-49. 

The Division appointed advisory committees to work with 
members of the Department in formulating requirements for 
the certification of dance teachers of various types of dancing, 
such as ballet, modern, acrobatic, and tap. These requirements 
were referred to the State Superintendent and upon his recom- 
mendation were approved by the State Board of Education. 

An advisory committee on advertising was assembled to 
draw up a code of ethics for nonpublic school advertising. The 
suggestions made were referred to the operators of nonpublic, 
nonacademic schools ; were approved by the State Board of Edu- 
cation, upon the recommendation of the vState Superintendent; 
and were incorporated in the requirements for approval of such 
schools. 

At the invitation of the Division, members of the State Board 
of Hairdressers and Beauty Culturists accompanied Department 
supervisors in visits to all the beauty schools in the State. One 
school was closed because it failed to meet the standards, and 
other schools complied with suggestions made by the representa- 
tives of the two departments. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



Upon invitation, also, the Watchmakers' Guild of Baltimore 
named representatives to survey the watchmaking schools with 
supervisors from the Accreditation Division. The group visited 
the schools several times and offered suggestions. 

An advisory committee on barber schools, consisting of a 
member of the State Board of Barber Examiners, a representa- 
tive of the Shop Owners' Association, and a representative of 
the Union, visited the barber schools in the State with one of 
the Division supervisors. The group recommended that one 
barber school be not approved. In accordance with the law, it 
was given time to meet the requirements, but it failed to do so. 
Later it appealed to the State Board of Education, which sus- 
tained the action of the State Superintendent. The school has 
since filed suit to question the constitutionality of the nonpublic 
school law. The Circuit Court has dismissed the case, but an 
appeal to a higher court has been filed. 

The chief engineer of one local radio station and a chief 
research engineer of a local radio manufacturer made a special 
evaluation of the radio schools. In general the reports were 
favorable. 

The head of the illustration department of the Johns Hop- 
kins University visited the photography schools, with representa- 
tives of the Division, and a member of the engineering faculty 
of Johns Hopkins and a consulting engineer made a thorough 
survey of the refrigeration schools. The reports were favorable, 
although certain revisions in the courses were suggested and 
adopted. 

A Johns Hopkins professor of chemical engineering who had 
specialized in plastics advised the Division about a school of 
plastics which began operating without having first obtained the 
approval of the State Superintendent. The school was visited 
several times, was later approved, but closed temporarily. At 
the request of the State Superintendent the school surrendered 
its certificate of approval and has not reopened. 

A specialist in higher education at the U. S. Office of Educa- 
tion and a professor from Johns Hopkins University advised 
about the steps which a Hebrew College and teacher training 
school should be required to take before being allowed to award 
a bachelor's degree. 

Another Johns Hopkins professor visited a mission house 
to evaluate a course in philosophy which the organization gives 
and for which approval for veterans' training was requested. 

A committee consisting of the Director of the Juilliard 
School of Music, the Dean of the Peabody Conservatory, a super- 
visor of music in the colored schools in Washington, the Presi- 
dent of the State Teachers College at Bowie, and the Dean of 
McCoy College, visited a school of music in Baltimore and recom- 
mended necessary changes before, the institution should be given 
the privilege of awarding degrees. 



52 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



A specialist from the Training School at Vineland, New 
Jersey, visited several special schools with members of the Ac- 
creditation Division and recommended revisions of the programs 
offered. 

Members of the Vocational Division in the State Department 
of Education visited many trade and technical schools with repre- 
sentatives of the Accreditation Division. 

Regulations and Procedures 

During the year the Division gradually built up a body of per- 
tinent regulations and procedures which will be used as a basis in 
carrying out the mandate of the Legislature in connection with 
the approval of nonpublic schools. The schools affected, as well as 
the best authorities available in the various fields, have been 
consulted and no school has objected to the regulations adopted. 
In general the schools have cooperated to make the operation of 
the law a success. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



DIVISION OF FINANCE AND RESEARCH 

Under the reorganization plan of the Department, the 
Bureau of Finance, Statistics and Educational Measurements was 
expanded to include all aspects of budget making and financial 
accounting. Formerly, certain of these functions were performed 
by individuals who were directly responsible to the State Super- 
intendent or who were assigned to a specific division. The 
primary purpose of the reorganization was to effect better plan- 
ning and coordination within and among all of the divisions of 
the Department and to define more clearly relationships within 
the field services to the counties and the City of Baltimore. 

The following are the major functions of the Division of 
Finance and Research: 

Prepare budget of the department 
Maintain budgetary control system 
Recommend payment of claims 
Prepare payrolls 

Account and audit department staff travel 
Maintain system of fiscal records and reports for the de- 
partment 

Administer the purchase of all supplies and equipment for 

the department 
Administer office equipment and supply control 
Distribute State financial aid in accordance with law 
Distribute Federal funds in accordance with the State Plan 

and Federal regulations 
Check to determine that local political subdivisions (each 
county and the City of Baltimore) levy taxes for the 
support of public schools in accordance with law 
Make studies of State and local finance needs 
Advise local school authorities on financing current ex- 
pense and capital outlay 
Collect statistical information relating to the administra- 
tion and supervision of the public schools 
Prepare periodic statistical reports 

Conduct basic and evaluative research for the purpose of 

guiding policy determination 
Advise on research problems 
Disseminate research findings 

Provide research service to individuals and agencies upon 
request 

The following staff is provided to execute the functions 
enumerated above : 

Director 

Supervisor for Finance 
Supervisor for Research 

Assistant Supervisor for Finance (Teachers Colleges) 
Auditor 

Statistician I (2) 
Statistician II (3) 
Principal Account Clerk I 
Principal Account Clerk II (2) 



54 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



Senior Account Clerk 
Senior Clerk 

Stenographer-Secretary (2) 
Senior Stenographer 
Senior Typist 

Increase in Pupil Enrollment 

The marked rise in the birth rate beginning in 1940, a sharp 
increase in in-migration from Baltimore City and Washington, 
D. C, into the counties of Maryland and an increased persistence 
at the high school level are factors which have caused our public 
school population to increase at an abnormal rate. The obvious 
problems are to provide an adequate number of standard class- 
rooms to house these prospective pupils and to supply qualified 
teachers to instruct them. 

The specific immediate problem was to predict with a high 
degree of accuracy the number of pupils who would be enrolled 
during the next decade. A statistician with previous experience 
in the Vital Statistics Bureau of the State Department of Health 
was assigned to this problem. The following factors were ana- 
lyzed carefully and used to estimate the enrollments : 

1. Resident births 

2. Per cent of school-age children enrolled in public 
schools 

3. Net effect of in-migration and out-migration 

4. Per cent of nonpromotions at the different grade levels 

5. Per cent leaving school permanently at the different 
high school grade levels 

6. Estimated enrollments by grade for the nation as pre- 
pared by the U. S. Census Bureau 

As a result of this analysis, it is estimated that the enroll- 
ment in Maryland public schools ending June 1949 to June 1957 
will be as follows: 



1949 299,520 

1950 317,352 

1951 339,961 

1952 355,174 

1953 365,578 

1954 383,781 

1955 402,347 

1956 417,246 

1957 428,388 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

Libraries for the public, the schools, and the State institu- 
tions have greatly increased their services to the people of Mary- 
land. More people have access to more and better books and 
better library service than at any time in the history of Maryland. 

The Division of Library Extension this year (1) held con- 
ferences of county library administrators for discussions of poli- 
cies and problems; (2) held a public meeting attended by one 
hundred and twenty-five representatives of State organizations, 
library trustees, and librarians to review accomplishments and 
needs of the developing library service with a view toward possi- 
ble improvement in library legislation; (3) assisted in planning 
the activities and operation of the libraries in several smaller 
counties, and set up technical organizational procedures; (4) con- 
sulted with boards of library trustees (5) visited and made 
recommendations for improving the services of libraries, 
branches, and bookmobiles; (6) aided in securing qualified per- 
sonnel for school and public libraries. 

Its circulation of books, pamphlets, periodicals, clippings, 
' and audio-visual materials increased in 1948 by 27 per cent over 
the former year, and by 53 per cent in 1949 over 1948. Besides 
the use of its own stock of 46,000 books, it arranged interhbrary 
loans of 3,000 books from the Enoch Pratt Free Library of 
Baltimore City and other libraries in Maryland and other states 
for the use of the people of the counties. The circulation of 
films, which were purchased by the Division of Instruction, was 
added to the service of the Division. 

Public Libraries 

Public libraries can boast an increase of 200,000 volumes 
and 1,000,000 circulation in 1949 as compared to 1946. Eighty- 
four per cent of the State's population and 71 per cent of the 
population of the counties live in the areas served by the State's 
eleven county library systems and in the seven cities which have 
tax-supported public libraries. The cities in which the public 
libraries are located' have per capita incomes equal to, or larger 
than, those of the counties having library systems. These counties 
are Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Cecil, Garrett, Harford, Howard, 
Prince George's, Queen Anne's, Talbot, Washington, and Wico- 
mico. The cities are Baltimore, Bethesda, Cumberland, Frederick, 
Greenbelt, Silver Spring, and Takoma Park. No new county 
library was established this year, though Washington County 
qualified for State aid as of June 1, 1949. 

New bookmobiles replaced old ones in Harford and Talbot 
counties. The Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore City began 
the operation of a large trailer truck bookmobile in areas which 
are remote from branch libraries. The Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce of Salisbury raised money to buy the bookmobile which 



56 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



operates in Wicomico County. The four other counties with 
bookmobile service are Anne Arundel, Cecil, Garrett, and Prince 
George's. 

The Queen Anne's County Library Board remodeled its 
building- in Centreville and by taking- in the half of the first floor 
which it formerly rented, has room for increased materials and 
service. Formal dedication was held on November 6, at which 
time a plaque, honoring Miss Matilda B. Keating who was com- 
pleting thirty-five years of service as librarian, was hung. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. Davis gave the city of Westminster 
a church which is to be remodeled for use as a hbrary. They 
also gave a business building which has a net annual income of 
about $12,000 which will be used for remodeling the church 
and for library service. 

The Sociology Department of the University of Maryland 
made a study of the State with recommendations for possible 
combinations of two or more counties to form regional library 
systems. 

School Libraries 

The philosophy of school librarianship developing in Mary- 
land is that the library is an integral part of the school program, 
meeting the needs of pupils and teachers by supplying them with 
a wide variety of materials, thus enlarging and enriching the 
curriculum. It is a sound principle as is indicated by the interest 
of administrators, supervisors, teachers, and librarians. 

The most significant factor in school library development 
this school year was the emphasis on and interest in inservice 
training for school library personnel. Two counties held summer 
workshops for their school libraries. A published handbook on 
school library administration came from one of the groups. The 
Negro librarians and teacher-librarians from Anne Arundel, 
Baltimore, Harford, and Howard counties met for a one-day work 
conference. Morgan College started an integrated twelve-hour 
program of library science to be offered in two consecutive sum- 
mers. This program was planned with the advice of Mr. Paul E. 
Huflfington and Miss Mae Graham. 

Between 90 and 100 librarians and teacher-librarians took 
part in some form of inservice training during the summer of 
1949. Eleven of these people attended library schools out of 
the State. 

Most of the counties are now appropriating funds on a Der 
pupil basis for library materials ; a few still use only a matching 
basis. 

Library Development in State Institutions 
Work of this Division with the State institutions has been 
characterized by an increase in library activity and interest 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



throughout the various departments and agencies concerned with 
institutions and within the institutions themselves. 

Of special significance this year was the library development 
in three State tuberculosis hospitals by the State Department 
of Health, with the financial support of the Maryland Tubercu- 
losis Association and the professional advice and assistance of 
the Library Extension Division. The hbrary demonstration pro- 
ject at Victor Cullen Hospital, started in 1948 under the pro- 
fessional supervision of the Supervisor of County and Institution 
libraries, is not only providing a service of value in the recovery 
and rehabilitation of patients at this hospital but has also been 
an incentive for the planning and organization of libraries at 
Henryton and Mt. Wilson hospitals. It has resulted in the 
approval of salary of two librarian positions in the State Depart- 
ment of Health budget for 1949-50. In such cooperative projects, 
the Supervisor of County and Institution Libraries has: studied 
the situation in each institution ; drawn up the plan for each hos- 
pital library project in terms of necessary personnel, books, and 
material; recommended standards for personnel, books, and 
service; prepared questionnaires to determine patients' reading 
interests and abilities; aided in book selection for these insti- 
tutions; helped in organizational procedure; recommended for 
employment qualified librarians at the Victor Cullen Hospital 
and Henryton Hospital; made suggestions for library quarters; 
held frequent conferences with the two hospital librarians. 

Considerable attention was given during this year to con- 
ferences with members of the staffs of the correctional institu- 
tions and juvenile training schools of the State in stimulating 
interest in improving library resources and services within each 
institution and in surveying existing libraries and planning for 
both immediate and long range programs. Specific activity was 
directed toward assistance to educational directors in the pur- 
chase of carefully selected material, discarding of the undesir- 
able and useless material, a reorganization of library materials 
and practices, and an increased use of the materials loaned by 
the Library Extension Division. The Maryland House of Correc- 
tion, Maryland State Reformatory for Women, and Montrose 
School for Girls showed marked and continual improvement in 
library services. Boy's Village at Cheltenham, which has had 
no library, recently purchased about 400 books and periodicals 
and is in the process of organizing and planning for library 
service. 

State-Wide Interest 

It is encouraging to note the increased citizen interest in 
library services and library needs. Numerous State organizations 
have adopted the development of State-wide library service as 
part of their programs. The Maryland Library Association has 
devoted most of its program to emphasizing the development and 
needs of public libraries. The Maryland Congress of Parents 



58 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



and Teachers; the Maryland State Teachers' Association; the 
Maryland Tuberculosis Association ; the Farm Bureau ; the Home- 
makers Clubs; the League of Women Voters; The Maryland 
Federation of Women's Clubs; The American Association of 
University Women; the Senior 4-H; the Grange; the Ameri- 
can Legion Auxiliary ; Kiwanis, Rotary, and Lions Clubs ; Junior 
Chamber of Commerce; Business and Professional Women's 
Club, and many other groups are promoting better library ser- 
vice. It is this interest, together with the stimulus and aid 
provided by Public Libraries Law, 1945, that has been responsi- 
ble for increased library activity. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 
Although it has been increasingly difficult to replace teachers 
and obtain additional teachers in the field of Vocational Educa- 
tion, the program continued to expand, due to the increase in 
the size of the classes, better organization of the teaching con- 
tent, and improvement in physical facilities. The county boards 
of education have provided exceptionally fine facilities in this area 
in a number of secondary schools throughout the State. 

One new program which had been introduced and which 
began to expand during this year was that which deals with 
assisting juniors and seniors in high school in becoming ac- 
quainted with and adjusted to full-time employment. In general, 
it is known as the ''Diversified Occupation Program," which 
means that selected seniors not planning to go to college but 
planning to go to work upon completion of their high school 
courses, have their programs arranged so that they attend school 
in the morning and enter employment in the afternoons and on 
Saturdays, using the community as a laboratory for the school. 
While employed these pupils meet all of the requirements of 
State and Federal laws and receive the beginner's hourly rate of 
compensation. For the actual work experience while employed 
these students receive the same high school credit they would 
receive had they spent their time under instruction in the school 
laboratories or shops, thereby permitting such students to gradu- 
ate with their class with a regular high school diploma. A mem- 
ber of the faculty of the high school, known as a "Coordinator," 
is given sufficient time to visit the places which offer employ- 
ment opportunities, both before and during the employment 
period. This person's responsibilities are to assist the youth 
in making the necessary adjustments, working with adults, 
realizing the opportunities for real work experience, as well as 
correlating the educational content and activities of the school 
with the needs of the occupation. This type of educational 
service is increasing in demand and shows great promise in 
assisting youth make the adjustment from full-time school to 
full-time employment, especially in smaller communities. 

The second major development in this area was in the field 
of Administration and Supervision. Realizing the need for 
further coordination of the supervision from the State office 
in the fields of Vocational Education, the Assistant Superin- 
tendent in Charge of Vocational Education, developed a plan 
whereby four or five supervisors representing the areas of agri- 
culture, business education, homemaking, trade and industry 
education, and guidance, would visit a given county and study 
the complete program of Vocational Education in the secondary 
schools of that county. The period of time used in making this 
study would extend from three to four days. The supervisors 
in their respective areas developed instruments which were 
used to evaluate the effectiveness of the instruction which was 
given. After visiting the secondary schools in the county and 



60 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



making an analysis of the situation, the supervisors met with 
the superintendent and his administrative staff and, in some 
cases, the high school principals, in order to discuss their find- 
ings. As a result, a comprehensive report was written, giving 
the Board of Education an appraisal of the program as it existed, 
with recommendations for future development. In the three 
counties thus visited the finest cooperation existed. Such county- 
wide studies were made only after this Department had been 
invited by the superintendent and his staff to do so. 

The new technique of rendering additional supervisory ser- 
vice by the State office to the county school system will supple- 
ment the existing plan of individual visits to the counties. It 
shows great promise and should develop into a very effective 
means of coordinating the efforts of the County Boards of Educa- 
tion and the State Department of Education. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

One of the most significant features of the Vocational Re- 
habilitation program during the year 1948-49 was the emphasis 
placed on acquainting all citizens of Maryland with the services 
being offered to disabled persons. An intensive campaign of 
talks before civic groups, human interest stories in the news- 
papers, and discussions over the radio was conducted by the 
entire rehabilitation staff. The project was augmented by a new 
series of fifteen-minute radio transcriptions entitled ''Unsung 
Victory" describing work for the blind, — this was broadcast over 
ten stations throughout the State. Spot announcements by ''fam- 
ous name personalities" were broadcast during the promotion 
of National Employ the Physically Handicapped week. 

Results of this effort were reflected in a larger case load 
than at any time since the program was started twenty years 
ago. Of the known 15,000 disabled Maryland citizens who are 
eligible for vocational rehabilitation, 5,108 were on the active 
roll and 3,773 of these were actually receiving services on June 
30, 1949. Of the active cases, 1,859 live in the counties and 1,911 
in Baltimore City. The average age of the group served was 25, 
the average education — eighth grade, and slightly more than 
half of them were single. There were twice as many males as 
females, and 76 per cent were white, and 24 per cent colored. 

The public schools as usual reported more persons than any 
other agency (545) while hospitals were next (432) and public 
welfare departments third (264). Orthopedic disabilities led 
the list, although 445 tuberculous and 250 totally blind cases 
were served. Vocational training was the major service rendered. 

In 1948-49, each Maryland counselor was handling a much 
higher number of disabled persons than the average for all 
counselors throughout the United States. Nevertheless, we still 
reached only one-third of the known disabled persons who are 
eligible for and in need of vocational rehabilitation service. 

An agreement was reached with the United Mine Workers 
for providing physical rehabilitation for disabled miners who 
were injured during their employment within the State, — the 
Union pays for all hospitalization and the Rehabilitation Division 
provides counseling, training, and placement. A number of 
severely-disabled clients of the Division were sent to the well- 
known Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center near Staunton, 
Virginia, for occupational and vocational training through an 
agreement with the Virginia Rehabilitation Service. 

Two studies of the Maryland program were made during the 
year. They produced effective results and commanded nation- 
wide attention. The District Supervisor of Rehabilitation for 
the Eastern Shore made an intensive case-finding study in Wico- 
mico County in an effort to contact each person with a disability 
of any type, and a graduate student from Bryn Mawr College 



62 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



did a follow-up study of all tuberculous clients who were re- 
habilitated in the State during the years 1946-48. 

Case Finding Study in Wicomico County 

Federal aid for vocational rehabilitation has been dis- 
tributed to the states on the assumption that seven persons in 
every 1,000 of the general population are eligible for rehabili- 
tation services. This has been strictly an estimate based on 
scattered studies from time to time over the last 20-year period. 
In an effort to test the validity of this assumption, a member 
of the Maryland rehabilitation staff organized and conducted a 
case-finding study in what we believe to be a typical Maryland 
county — Wicomico. This county has a population of 39,850 per- 
sons and is partially urban and partially rural, with a fairly 
normal ratio of persons of above average, average and low 
economic status. There is a good balance between industry and 
agriculture ; home owners and tenant farmers ; white and colored 
persons. It was felt that a fairly accurate census of the handi- 
capped in Wicomico County would assist us in determining a 
basis for promoting a State-wide program in Maryland. 

Making use of a County Advisory Committee and using all 
available resources, one week was set aside for intensive pub- 
licity for the project featuring newspaper articles, radio spot 
announcements, and a direct mail campaign in which 5,000 
double postal cards were sent to a selected group. The response 
was naturally greatest by those who were most severely handi- 
capped, the home bound, and those whose disability was aggra- 
vated by advanced age. 

The results of the study were most enlightening. A total 
of 652 persons were reported in the mail campaign as being dis- 
abled in some way, and 53 were reported from radio publicity; 
244 were former clients of the Division; 253 disabled veterans; 
321 inmates of State institutions; 215 on current active rehabili- 
tation rolls; and 271 from miscellaneous sources. Allowing for 
a wide margin of error which is inherent in any such undertak- 
ing as this, it was estimated that there were perhaps as many 
as 947 persons out of a total county population of 39,850 who 
might be potential rehabilitation clients. 

At the close of the fiscal year, the counselors in the Eastern 
Shore district were making an intensive study of all persons re- 
ferred in the case-finding project, and it is reasonable to assume 
that at least 50 per cent of the total will be found eligible for 
and in need of services that the Division can render. 

Follow-up Study of Tuberculous Clients 

During the year 1949, a study was made of those tubercu- 
lous persons rehabilitated by the Division during the years 1946, 
1947, and 1948 in an attempt to measure the relationship of 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



rehabilitation service to vocational adjustment. The pertinent 
questions to be answered were : Have these persons remained on 
the jobs for which they were trained? Were they placed in 
occupations suitable to their physical and mental capacities? 
Is their present earning power adequate to justify the expendi- 
ture of public funds for their rehabilitation? Do these individuals 
feel they are making a contribution to the society of which they 
are a part? 

It was found that most of these rehabilitated clients are 
still employed at the jobs for which they were trained and placed, 
or they have received promotions and better salaries within 
the same occupational classification. They have been steadily 
employed since placement, and they like their present jobs. They 
are employed in a wide variety of occupations at average or 
above average salaries. Only a few are required to work part 
time for small salaries because of the extent of disability. 

A very small group returned for further hospitalization 
and a few were unemployed at the time of the survey and 
requested further counseling. 

While all the persons replying to the questionnaire did not 
add personal comments, the many who did gave ample evidence 
that they are healthy individuals making a living, marrying, 
and taking their places in their communities. 

These clients commented quite favorably on the value of 
this service in their adjustment after the long illness and stressed 
the need for extending the benefits to more patients earlier in 
their cure. Many of them had been discharged from the hos- 
pitals before much had been initiated toward the in-sanatorium 
rehabilitation program. Most encouraging were the requests 
to publicize the service so that all tuberculous patients might 
have the advantage of it. 

This study is valuable to the Division in its planning for 
greater service to this group of the disabled. In 1949, of the 
837 persons rehabilitated by the Vocational Rehabilitation Di- 
vision, 105 were from the tuberculous group. Many of these 
were far advanced on their vocational rehabilitation plan before 
they were discharged from the hospitals. 

Much more needs to be done to provide equal educational 
opportunities for the young persons removed from their com- 
munities and schools because of tuberculosis. The vocational 
rehabilitation of these patients is delayed often because of the 
need of basic education. In this study the clients requested that 
teachers be provided to teach high school students during the 
period of their cure. In most cases, after two or three years' 
interruption, the pupil does not wish to return to the public 
high school with much younger children, but he could make 
some progress in the hospital if teachers were provided. 



64 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



Anniversary Dinner 

Among the highlights of the year's activities was a dinner 
meeting sponsored by the State Board of Education in celebra- 
tion of the twentieth anniversary of vocational rehabilitation in 
Maryland. Attending the dinner were 400 leading citizens repre- 
senting the fields of health, education, welfare, compensation, 
civic clubs, and the general public. The President of the State 
Board of Education, the State Superintendent of Schools, and 
the Director of ^Vocational Rehabilitation made reports on the 
splendid progres*s that the Division has achieved. The principal 
address of the occasion was given by Dr. John J. Lee, Dean of 
the Graduate School of Wayne University, and president of the 
National Society for Crippled Children and Adults. 

Action on Case Load 

Of the 5,108 disabled persons on the live roll, 2,764 were 
on the roll at the beginning of the year and the other 2,344 
w^ere new cases. During the year 3,773 persons actually received 
service. 

The "new" cases were reported by 31 different agencies 
from all 23 counties and Baltimore City. Hospital clinics led 
the list with 324, while public schools came next, with 253. 

Rehabilitation funds w^ere used to purchase 3,620 services, 
and 1,846 additional services were rendered with funds con- 
tributed by other agencies or by the disabled clients themselves 
or their families. 

The total of 837 persons was the highest number ever re- 
habilitated in Maryland in one year. This represented a 39 per 
cent increase over the previous year. Four hundred and thirty 
of these lived in Baltimore City and 407 lived in the counties. 
Among the group were 51 blind persons. These 837 rehabilitated 
persons are now earning at the rate of $1,401,602.00 a year, and 
are supporting not only themselves but in addition, 982 de- 
pendents. 

Expenditures 

Expenditures for the year amounting to $361,122.08 con- 
sisted of appropriations of $256,422.00 from Federal funds and 
$104,700.08 from State funds. The increase in State funds ex- 
pended over the previous year amounted to over 29 per cent. 
• These funds were expended as follows: 

Administration $ 20,833.95 

Guidance and Supervision 139,457.70 

Case Services 200,830.43 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



TABLE 1 — Enrollments, Teaching Staff, and Number of Schools, Public and Nonpublic, by 
Color: State of Maryland, Baltimore City, and Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1949 





Grand Total 


Elementary 


Secondary 


Type of School 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 



ENROLLMENT 



Public and Nonpublic 




















State 


390,202 


316,808 


73,394 


272,373 


217,380 


54,993 


117,829 


99,428 


18,401 


City 


156,704 


116,220 


40,484 


113,904 


82,871 


31,033 


42,800 


33,349 


9,451 




233,498 


200,588 


32,910 


158,469 


134,509 


23,960 


75,029 


66,079 


8,950 


Public 




















State 


*322,738 


251,927 


70,811 


*217,508 


164,866 


52,642 


*105,230 


87,061 


18,169 


City 


*117,476 


78,762 


38,714 


*81,872 


52,406 


29,466 


*35,604 


26,356 


9,248 


Countiest 


*205,262 


173,165 


32,097 


*135,636 


112,460 


23,176 


*69,626 


60,705 


8,921 


Nonpublic 






















67,464 


64,881 


2,583 


54,865 


52,514 


2,351 


12,599 


12,367 


232 


City 


39,228 


37,458 


1,770 


32,032 


30,465 


1,567 


7,196 


6,993 


203 


Counties 


28,236 


27,423 


813 


22,833 


22,049 


784 


5,403 


5,374 


29 



TEACHING STAFF 



Public and Nonpublic 




















State 


13,681 


11,296 


2,385 














City 


5,488 


4,151 


1,337 














Countiest 


8,193 


7,145 


1,048 














Public 




















State 


10,934 


8,641 


2,293 


6,288 


4,736 


1,552 


4,646 


3,905 


741 


City 


4,067 


2,798 


1,269 


2,470 


1,566 


904 


1,597 


1,232 


365 


Countiest 


6,867 


5,843 


1,024 


3,818 


3,170 


648 


3,049 


2,673 


376 


Nonpublic 




















State 


2,747 


2,655 


92 














City 


1,421 


1,353 


68 














Counties 


1,326 


1,302 


24 















NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 



Public and Nonpublic 




















State 


*1,319 


*977 


*342 


1,187 


867 


320 


300 


254 


46 


City 


*268 


*202 


*66 


231 


174 


57 


57 


48 


9 


Countiest 


*1,051 


*775 


*276 


956 


693 


263 


243 


206 


37 


Public 




















State 


*987 


*664 


*323 


880 


577 


303 


226 


183 


43 


City 


*154 


*100 


*54 


124 


77 


47 


34 


27 


7 


Countiest 


*833 


*564 


*269 


756 


500 


256 


192 


156 


36 


Nonpublic 




















State 


*332 


*313 


*19 


307 


290 


17 


74 


71 


3 


City 


*114 


*102 


*12 


107 


97 


10 


23 


. 21 


2 


Counties 


*218 


*211 


*7 


200 


193 


7 


51 


50 


1 



For basic data on these subjects, see TABLES I, II, III, IV, V, and X. 

* Excludes duplicates. t Excludes enrollments, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State 
Teachers Colleges. 



66 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 2 



School Census of Maryland Boys and Girls Under 21 Years of Age in 23 Maryland Counties 
by Age, Color, and Sex, November, 1948 



Total Number 




White 




Enumerated 








Grand 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 
oys 


Girls 


Total 








250,370 


127,262 


123,108 


210,075 


107,009 


103,066 


257,060 


130,632 


126,428 


216,670 


110,452 


10b, Zlo 


260,241 


133,041 


127,200 


219,430 


112,645 


106,785 


285,439 


145,957 


139,482 


242,486 


124,422 


11^,064 


444,639 


228,087 


216,552 


380,355 


195,738 


184,617 


14,573 


7,826 


6,747 


12,367 


6,683 


5,684 


15,568 


8,261 


7,307 


13,184 


7,004 


6,180 


16,975 


8,829 


8,146 


14,366 


7,513 


6,853 


17,209 


8,864 


8,345 


14,621 


7,571 


7,050 


17,924 


9,193 


8,731 


15,132 


7,804 


7,328 


18,078 


9,197 


8,881 


15,278 


7,779 


7,499 


18,131 


9,214 


8,917 


15,185 


7,733 


7,452 


18,779 


9,514 


9,265 


15,890 


^,100 


7,790 


19,284 


9,819 


9,465 


16,255 


8,295 


7,960 


19,499 


9,971 


9,528 


16,565 


8,528 


8,037 


20,529 


10,492 


10,037 


17,376 


8,943 


8,433 


20,860 


10,561 


10,299 


17,653 


8,955 


8,698 


21,743 


11,143 


10,600 


18,322 


9,410 


8,912 


23,453 


11,970 


11,483 


19,991 


10,243 


9,748 


25,125 


12,895 


12,230 


21,470 


11,058 


10,412 


27,850 


14,295 


13,555 


24,382 


12,490 


11,892 


24,790 


12,512 


12,278 


21,467 


10,823 


10,644 


24,445 


12,445 


12,000 


21,251 


10,870 


10,381 


25,495 


13,170 


12,325 


22,106 


11,452 


10,654 


27,518 


14,171 


13,347 


24,389 


12,594 


11,795 


26,811 


13,745 


13,066 


23,105 


11,890 


11,215 


138,438 






102,965 






423,877 






345,451 















Age 



Colored 



Total 



Boys 



Girls 



Total Counties 

(5-18) 1942 

(5-18) 1944 

(5-18) 1946 

(5-18) 1948 

Total Ages 20 or Under, 1948 

20 

19 

18 

17 

16 

15 

14 

13 

12 

11 

10 

9 

8 

7 

6 

5 

4 

3 

2 

1 

Under 1 

Baltimore City* 

(5-18) 1948 

Total State 

(5-18) 1948 



40,295 
40,390 
40,811 
42,953 

64,284 

2,206 
2,384 
2,609 
2,588 
2,792 
2,800 
2,946 
2,889 
3,029 
2,934 
3,153 
3,207 
3,421 
3,462 
3,655 
3,468 
3,323 
3,194 
3,389 
3,129 
3,706 



35.473 



78,426 



20,253 
20,180 
20,396 
21,535 

32,349 

1,143 
1,257 
1,316 
1,293 
1,389 
1,418 
1,481 
1,414 
1,524 
1,443 
1,549 
1,606 
1,733 
1,727 
1,837 
1,805 
1,689 
1,575 
1,718 
1,577 
1,855 



20,042 
20,210 
20,415 
21,418 

31,935 

1,063 
1,127 
1,293 
1,295 
1,403 
1,382 
1,465 
1,475 
1,505 
1,491 
1,604 
1,601 
1,688 
1,735 
1,818 
1,663 
1,634 
1,619 
1,671 
1,552 
1,851 



* Baltimore City figures from Police Census. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



TABLE 3 



Brief Summary of School Census of Maryland Children of Compulsory School Age: 

November, 1948 



County 

- 


Census 
Ages 7-15 Years 


CHANGEt 
1946 TO 1948 


Ages 7-15 in 
Number 


I No SCHOOLt 
Per Cent 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Color- 
ed 


Total 


White 


Color 
ed 


Total State 


273,680 


220,987 


52,693 




















Baltimore City* . . 
Total Counties . . . 


93,324 


68,472 


24,852 




















180,356 


152,515 


27,841 


+ 12,358 


+ 10,958 


+ 


1,400 


4,229 


2,972 


1,257 


2 


3 


1 


9 


4.5 


Allegany 


14,255 


14,073 


182 


+ 


517 


+ 


505 


+ 


12 


150 


150 




1 


1 


1 


1 




Anne Arundel .... 


13,879 


10,354 


3,525 


+ 


1,309 


+ 


1,097 


+ 


212 


384 


189 


195 


2 


8 


1 


8 


5.5 


Baltimore 


32,230 


29,373 


2,857 


+ 


3,483 


+ 


3,217 


+ 


266 


553 


495 


58 


1 


7 


1 


7 


2.0 


Calvert 


2,218 


1,016 


1,202 


+ 


135 


+ 


77 


+ 


58 


111 


30 


81 


5 





3 





6.7 




2,644 


2,013 


631 




8 




1 




7 


69 


46 


23 


2 


6 


2 


3 


3.6 


Carroll 


5,686 


•5,385 


301 


+ 


185 


+ 


169 


+ 


16 


186 


172 


14 


3 


3 


3 


2 


4.7 


Cecil 


4,375 


3,998 


377 


+ 


165 


+ 


137 


+ 


28 


62 


47 


15 


1 


4 


1 


2 


4.0 


Charles 


4,319 


2,363 


1,956 


+ 


403 


+ 


151 


+ 


252 


174 


54 


120 


4 





2 


3 


6.1 


Dorchester 


3,647 


2,440 


1,207 




54 




78 


+ 


24 


132 


81 


51 


3 


6 


3 


3 


4.2 




8,579 


7,799 


780 


+ 


309 


+ 


252 


+ 


57 


459 


399 


60 


5 


3 


5 


1 


7.7 


Garrett 


4,221 


4,221 




+ 


94 


+ 


94 






60 


60 




1 


4 


1 


4 






6,543 


5,718 


825 


+ 


452 


+ 


441 


+ 


11 


141 


122 


19 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2.3 


Howard. 


3,647 


2,882 


765 


+ 


255 


+ 


191 


+ 


64 


87 


61 


26 


2 


4 


2 


1 


3.4 


Kent 


1,889 


1,277 


612 


+ 


67 


+ 


73 




6 


39 


20 


19 


2 


1 


1 


6 


3.1 


Montgomery .... 


18,603 


16,966 


1,637 


+ 


2,343 


+ 


2,437 




94 


257 


151 


106 


1 


4 





9 


6.5 


Prince George's . . 


23,017 


18,617 


4,400 


+ 


2,340 


+ 


1,968 


+ 


372 


292 


148 


144 


1 


3 





8 


3.3 


Queen Anne's .... 


2,149 


1,552 


597 




51 




70 


+ 


19 


87 


58 


29 


4 





3 


7 


4.9 


St. Mary's 


4,130 


2,896 


1,234 


+ 


225 


+ 


168 


+ 


57 


207 


111 


96 


5 





3 


8 


7.8 




2,978 


1,746 


1,232 


+ 


1 




45 


+ 


46 


118 


62 


56 


4 





3 


6 


4.5 


Talbot 


2,674 


1,775 


899 


+ 


107 


+ 


79 


+ 


28 


54 


26 


28 


2 





1 


5 


3.1 


Washington 


10,742 


10,512 


230 




55 




72 


+ 


17 


306 


302 


4 


2 


8 


2 


9 


1.7 


Wicomico 


4,703 


3,542 


1,161 


+ 


74 


+ 


127 




53 


188 


135 


53 


4 





3 


8 


4.6 


Worcester 


3,228 


1,997 


1,231 


+ 


62 


+ 


41 


+ 


21 


113 


53 


60 


3 


5 


2 


7 


4.9 



* Baltimore City figures from Police Census. 

t Data for Baltimore City not available in comparable form. 



68 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 4 

Number and Per Cent of Maryland County Children, Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive, in 
Public, Private and Parochial Schools, and in No School: School Census, 

November, 1948 





Number 


Per Cent 


County 






Private and 






Private and 








Public 


Parochial 


No 


Public 


Parochial 


No 




Total 


School 


School 


School 


School 


School 


School 


WHITE AND COLORED CHILDREN 


Total and Average 
















1942 


163,154 


143,320 


13,053 


6,781 


87.8 


8.0 


4.2 


1944 


166,135 


144,705 


15,192 


6,238 


87.1 


9.1 


3.8 


1946 


167,998 


145,318 


17,382 


5,298 


86.5 


10.3 


3.2 


1948 


180,356 


155,693 


20,434 


4,229 


86.4 


11.3 


2.3 


Allegany 


14,255 


12,043 


2,062 


150 


84.4 


14.5 


1.1 


Anne Arundel 


13,879 


12,528 


967 


384 


90.2 


7.0 


2.8 


Baltimore 


32,230 


25,901 


5,776 


553 


80.4 


17.9 


1.7 


Calvert 


2,218 


2,058 


49 


111 


92.8 


2.2 


5.0 


Caroline 


2,644 


2,566 


9 


69 


97.1 


0.3 


2.6 


Carroll 


5,686 


5,252 


248 


186 


92.3 


4.4 


3.3 


Cecil 


4,375 


3,996 


317 


62 


91.4 


7.2 


1.4 


Charles 


4,319 


3,557 


588 


174 


82.4 


13.6 


4.0 


Dorchester 


3,647 


3,505 


10 


132 


96.1 


0.3 


3.6 


Frederick 


8,579 


7,558 


562 


459 


88.1 


6.6 


5.3 


Garrett 


4,221 


4.045 


116 


60 


95.9 


2.7 


1.4 


Harford 


6,543 


6,003 


399 


141 


91.8 


6.1 


2.1 


Howard 


3,647 


3,108 


452 


87 


85.2 


12.4 


2.4 


Kent 


1,889 


1,821 


29 


39 


96.4 


1.5 


2.1 


Montgomery 


18,603 


14,412 


3,934 


257 


77.5 


21.1 


1.4 


Prince George's 


23,017 


20,329 


2,396 


292 


88.3 


10.4 


1.3 


Queen Anne's 


2,149 


2,049 


13 


87 


95.4 


0.6 


4.0 


St. Mary's 


4,130 


1,970 


1,953 


207 


47.7 


47.3 


5.0 


Somerset 


2,978 


2,850 


10 


118 


95.7 


0.3 


4.0 


Talbot 


2,674 


2,533 


87 


54 


94.8 


3.2 


2.0 


Washington 


10,742 


10,011 


425 


306 


93.2 


4.0 


2.8 


Wicomico 


4,703 


4,499 


16 


188 


95.7 


3 


4.0 


Worcester 


3,228 


3,099 


16 


113 


96.0 


0.5 


3.5 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



TABLE 5 



Number and Per Cent of Maryland County Children, Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive, in 
Public, Private, and Parochial Schools, and in No School: School Census, 

November, 1948 





Number 


Per Cent 


County 






Private and 






Private and 








Public 


Parochial 


No 


Public 


Parochial 


No 




Total 


School 


School 


School 


School 


School 


School 



WHITE CHILDREN 

























1942 


136,599 


119,499 


12,400 


4,700 


87 


5 


9 


1 


3 


4 


1944 


139,723 


120,771 


14,505 


4,447 


86 


4 


10 


4 


3 


2 


1946 


141 557 


121 031 


16 675 


3 851 


85 


5 


11 




2 


7 


1948 


1 ^^9^1 




19 656 


2 972 


85 


2 


12 


9 




9 


Allegany 


14,073 


11,861 


2,062 


150 


84 


3 


14 


6 


1 


1 


Anne Arundel 


10,354 


9,245 


920 


189 


89 


3 


8 


9 


1 


8 


Baltimore 


29,373 


23,122 


' 5,756 


495 


78 


7 


19 


6 


1 


7 


Calvert 


1,016 


937 


49 


30 


92 


2 


4 


8 


3 







2,013 


1,958 


9 


46 


97 


3 





4 


2 


3 


Carroll 


5,385 


4,965 


248 


172 


92 


2 


4 


6 


3 


2 


Cecil 


3,998 


3,634 


317 


47 


90 


9 


7 


9 


1 


2 


Charles 


2,363 


1,858 


451 


54 


78 


6 


19 




2 


3 


Dorchester 


2,440 


2,351 


8 


81 


96 


4 





3 


3 


3 


Frederick 


7,799 


6,843 


557 


399 


87 


8 


7 


1 


5 


1 


Garrett 


4,221 


4,045 


116 


60 


95 


8 


2 


8 


1 


4 


Harford 


5,718 


5,197 


399 


122 


90 


9 


7 





2 


1 


Howard 


2,882 


2,415 


406 


61 


83 


8 


14 


1 


2 


1 


Kent 


1,277 


1,228 


29 


20 


96 




2 


3 


1 


6 




16,966 


12,897 


3,918 


151 


76 





23 


1 





9 


Prince George's 


18,617 


16,189 


2,280 


148 


87 





12 


.2 





8 


Queen Anne's 


1,552 


1,481 


13 


58 


95 


5 





8 


3 


7 


St. Mary's 


2,896 


1,217 


1,568 


111 


42 





54 


2 


3 


8 


Somerset 


1,746 


1,675 


9 


62 


95 


9 





5 


3 


6 


Talbot 


1,775 


1,662 


87 


26 


93 


6 


4 


9 


1 


5 


Washington 


10,512 


9,785 


425 


302 


93 


1 


4 





2 


9 




3,542 


3,393 


14 


135 


95 


8 





4 


3 


8 


Worcester 


1,997 


1,929 


15 


53 


96 


5 





8 


2 


7 



COLORED CHILDREN 



Total and Average 






















1942 


26,555 


23,821 


653 


2,081 


89 


7 


2 


5 


7 


8 


1944 


26,412 


23,934 


687 


1,791 


90 


6 


2 


6 


6 


8 


1946 


26,441 


24,287 


707 


1,447 


91 


8 


2 


7 


5 


5 


1948 


27,841 


25,806 


778 


1,257 


92 


7 


2 


8 


4 


5 


Allegany 


182 


182 






100 















3,525 


3,283 


'47 


i95 


93 


2 


i 


3 


5 


5 


Baltimore 


2,857 


2,779 


20 


58 


97 


3 





7 


2 





Calvert 


1,202 


1,121 




81 


93 


3 






6 


7 


Caroline 


631 


608 




23 


96 


4 






3 


6 


Carroll 


301 


287 




14 


95 


3 






4 


7 


Cecil 


377 


362 




15 


96 









4 





Charles 


1,956 


1,699 


137 


120 


86 


9 


7 





6 




Dorchester 


1,207 


1,154 


2 


51 


95 


6 





2 


4 


2 


Frederick 


780 


715 


5 


60 


91 


7 





6 


7 


7 


Garrett 






















Harford 


825 


806 




19 


97 


7 






2 


3 


Howard 


765 


693 


46 


26 


90 


6 


6 


6 


3 


4 


Kent 


612 


593 




19 


96 


9 






3 


1 




1,637 


1,515 


16 


106 


92 


5 


1 





6 


5 


Prince George's 


4,400 


4,140 


116 


144 


94 


1 


2 


6 


3 


3 


597 


568 




29 


95 


1 






4 


9 


St. Mary's 


1,234 


753 


385 


96 


61 





31 


2 


7 


8 


Somerset 


1,232 


1,175 


1 


56 


95 


4 


- 


1 


4 


5 


Talbot 


899 


871 




28 


96 


9 






3 


1 


Washington 


230 


226 




4 


98 


3 






1 


7 


Wicomico 


1,161 


1,106 


' 2 


53 


95 


2 


6 


2 


4 


6 


Worcester 


1,231 


1,170 


1 


60 


95 








1 


4 


9 



70 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 6 



Nonschool Attendants of Compulsory School Age, According to Handicap, Em- 
ployment, and Age Group: Counties of Maryland: School Census, November, 1948 







Children of Ages 7-15 Years Not In School 






Not Handicapped 


Handicapped 


County 


Employed 


Not Employed 


Employed 


Not Employed 




7-13 
Years 


14-15 
Years 


7-13 
Years 


14-15 
Years 


7-13 
Years 


14-15 
Years 


7-13 
Years 


14-15 
Years 



WHITE CHILDREN 



Total 1942 


124 


2,941 


164 


831 


* 


* 


*405 


*235 


1944. . 


117 


2,870 


159 


682 


* 


* 


*434 


*185 


1946 


99 


2,459 


91 


612 


2 


15 


405 


168 


1948 


50 


1,723 


97 


528 


3 


14 


393 


164 


Allegany 




38 


4 


65 






28 


15 


Anne Arundel 




79 


8 


40 






48 


14 


Baltimore 


S 


226 


13 


148 




'4 


69 


32 


Calvert 




17 




8 






2 




Caroline 


2 


21 


1 


11 




i 


8 


2 


Carroll 


1 


147 




1 




3 


16 


4 


Cecil 


1 


20 


'4 


15 






6 


1 


Charles 


1 


28 


6 


8 






8 


3 




2 


50 


2 


13 






10 


3 


Frederick 


18 


314 




29 






27 


11 


Garrett 




39 




2 




1 


13 


5 




'7 


59 


'9 


25 




2 


18 


2 


Howard 




31 


2 


12 






8 


8 


Kent 




17 










3 




Montgomery 


'3 


62 


29 


24 




1 


23 


*9 


Prince George's 




85 




7 






40 


16 


Queen Anne's 




42 




11 






4 


1 


St. Mary's 


6 


59 


14 


17 






9 


6 




1 


38 


2 


11 






5 


5 


Talbot 




19 




1 






5 


1 




5 


175 


3 


68 




2 


32 


17 


Wicomico 




121 










7 


7 


Worcester 




36 




12 






4 


1 


COLORED CHILDREN 


Total 1942 


88 


1,301 


190 


280 


* 


* 


*146 


*76 


1944 


81 


1,201 


81 


204 






*156 


*68 


1946 


46 


980 


64 


179 


4 


4 


136 


34 


1948 


39 


748 


101 


219 


1 


1 


106 


42 




















Anne Arundel 


'8 


160 


20 


49 






14 


'4 


Baltimore 




25 


4 


17 






9 


3 


Calvert 


'4 


40 


8 


21 






7 


1 


Caroline 




14 




3 






5 


1 


Carroll 


1 


13 














Cpcil 


2 


6 


1 


'4 








*i 


Charles 


11 


73 


12 


14 






'9 


1 


Dorchester 


1 


30 


1 


14 






2 


3 


Frederick 




39 




12 






6 


3 


Garrett 


















Harford 




12 


i 


'4 






'2 








20 




3 






2 


'i 


Kent 




16 


1 


2 










Montgomery 


3 


43 


34 


15 






'9 


'2 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 




108 




1 






25 


10 




21 




7 






1 




St. Mary's 


6 


49 


13 


21 




1 


8 


"3 


Somerset 


2 


36 


3 


8 






5 


2 


Talbot , 




13 


3 


9 






1 


2 






3 




1 














47 










'3 


'3 


Worcester 


i 


40 










3 


2 



Status of employment of handicapped not reported before 1946. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



TABLE 7 

Handicapped School Attendants of Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive: Counties of Maryland: 
School Census, November, 1948 



County 


Handicapped County School Attendants of Ages 7-15 Years 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 1942 


1,094 


896 


198 


1944 


986 


787 


199 


1946 


1,288 


1,135 


153 


1948 


1,699 


1,514 


185 


Allegany 


133 


132 


1 




224 


190 


34 


Baltimore 


263 


243 


20 


Calvert 


13 


1 


12 


Caroline. . 


35 


30 


5 


Carroll 


104 


101 


3 


Cecil 


47 


46 


1 


Charles 


22 


12 


10 


Dorchester 


41 


27 


14 


Frederick 


60 


56 


4 


Garrett 


39 


39 




Harford 


197 


175 


22 


Howard 


22 


18 


4 


Kent 


7 


6 


1 


Montgomery 


125 


119 


6 


Prince George's 


38 


37 


1 


Queen Anne's 


17 


15 


2 


St. Mary's 


43 


29 


14 


Somerset 


40 


29 


11 


Talbot 


11 


8 


3 


Washington 


156 


155 




Wicomico 


15 


11 


4 


Worcester 


47 


35 


12 



72 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 8— Status of Youth of Ages 16-20 Years, Inclusive, Enumerated in 23 Maryland 

Counties, November, 1948 



Ages 


Total 
Number 
Ages 16-20 


Per Cent of Total Number op Ages 16-20 Years, Inclusive 


In School 


Employed 


Not Employed 


Not 
Handicapped 


Handicapped 


Not 
Handicapped 


Handicapped 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


WHITE 


Total and 


























Average . . . 


36,575 


33,095 


36.0 


37.0 


59.2 


52.0 


0.4 


0.2 


3.9 


10.3 


0.5 


0.5 


16 


7,804 


7,328 


69.1 


72.5 


26,3 


20.4 


0.2 


0.1 


3.9 


6.5 


0.5 


0.5 


17 


7,571 


7,050 


44.9 


46.6 


50.0 


42.4 


0.3 


0.1 


4.4 


10.3 


0.4 


0.6 


18 


7,513 


6,853 


27.0 


26.3 


68.0 


62.2 


0.4 


0.1 


3.9 


11.1 


0.7 


0.3 


19 


7,004 


6,180 


18.4 


17.9 


76.3 


68.6 


0.5 


0.2 


4.3 


12.8 


0.5 


0.5 


20 


6,683 


5,684 


16.1 


12.9 


79.8 


74.7 


0.5 


0.2 


3.1 


11.8 


0.5 


0.4 



COLORED 



Total and 














































Average. . . 


6,398 


6,181 


20 


3 


26 


1 


73 


2 


53 


8 





4 





1 


5 


5 


19 


3 





6 





7 


16 


1,389 


1,403 


47 


5 


57 


3 


45 


2 


28 


2 





2 





1 


6 


3 


14 








8 





4 


17. . ; . . . 


1,293 


1,295 


26 


1 


31 


6 


66 


5 


45 


8 





4 





1 


6 


3 


21 


9 





7 





6 


18 


1,316 


1,293 


12 


6 


16 


5 


80 


6 


58 


7 





6 





3 


5 


6 


23 


7 





6 





8 
8 


19 


1,257 


1,127 


6 


9 


10 


2 


87 


7 


68 








2 





1 


4 


9 


20 


9 





3 





20 


1,143 


1,063 


4 





6 


8 


91 


1 


75 


9 





4 





1 


4 





16 


4 





5 





8 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



TABLE 9 



Number of Youth of Ages 16-20 Years, Inclusive: Counties of Maryland: School Census, 

November, 1948 









Per Cent of Total Number of Ages 16-20 Years, Inclusive 




Total 
Number 


In School 


Employed 


Not Employed 


County 


Ages 16-20 
.Years 






Not 
Handicapped 


Handicapped 


Not 
Handicapped 


Handicapped 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


BoS^s 


Girls 



WHITE YOUTH 



Total and 














































Average. . . 


36,575 


33,095 


36 





37 





59 


2 


52 








.4 





2 


3 


9 


10 


3 





5 





5 


Allegany . . 


3,855 


3,681 


37 


1 


37 


1 


53 


1 


46 


8 





.4 





1 


8 


7 


15 


.4 





7 





6 


A. Arundel 


2,223 


2,019 


31 


6 


31 


3 


62 


3 


55 


4 





2 





1 


5 


4 


13 


.0 





5 





2 


Baltimore . 


6,511 


5,996 


36 


4 


36 


4 


59 


7 


54 


7 





5 





1 


2 


8 


8 


.4 





6 





4 


Calvert . . . 


179 


193 


20 


1 


37 


3 


75 


9 


44 


6 





6 






2 


8 


18 


.1 





6 






Caroline . . . 


603 


549 


20 


5 


27 


7 


74 


8 


60 


1 


1 








2 


3 





10 


.5 





7 


i 


5 


Carroll .... 


1,520 


1,352 


23 





29 


6 


74 


3 


64 


3 


1 








4 


1 




5 


3 





6 





4 


Cecil 


1,017 


948 


27 


6 


31 


2 


66 


3 


47 


3 





6 





1 


5 





20 


9 





5 





5 


Charles . . . 


551 


484 


33 


7 


38 


6 


63 


3 


48 


4 





4 





2 


2 


4 


12 








2 





8 


Dorchester 


658 


684 


25 


5 


25 


6 


70 


1 


61 


9 





6 





1 


3 


2 


12 


1 





6 





3 


Frederick. . 


1,970 


1,897 


22 


5 


28 


9 


73 


5 


63 


2 





3 





3 


3 


2 


7 








5 





6 


Garrett . . . 


1,007 


916 


22 


4 


26 


5 


67 


7 


58 


3 





1 






8 


9 


14 


9 





9 





3 


Harford . . . 


1,393 


1,326 


31 


5 


34 


7 


64 


4 


54 


5 





9 


6 


2 


2 


6 


9 


8 





6 





8 


Howard . . . 


759 


635 


25 


5 


31 


8 


68 


9 


52 


3 





3 






4 


6 


15 


4 





7 





5 


Kent 


371 


345 


27 


5 


32 


8 


69 


8 


50 


7 






6 


3 


2 


2 


16 


2 





5 






Montgomery 


4,161 


3,157 


72 


3 


70 


5 


24 


6 


22 


7 








* 


2 


9 


6 


6 





2 


6 


2 


Pr. George's 
Q. Anne's . . 


3,472 


3,101 


40 


8 


37 


1 


56 





57 


7 





1 




* 


2 


7 


5 








4 





2 


371 


353 


22 


4 


31 


4 


75 


5 


56 


7 










1 


3 


10 


8 





8 


1 


1 


St. Mary's . 


659 


544 


22 


8 


31 


6 


72 


8 


57 


3 


6 


9 


i 


7 


2 


7 


8 


8 





8 





6 


Somerset . . 


546 


478 


21 


6 


22 


4 


75 


5 


64 


9 





2 





4 


2 


5 


11 


9 





2 





4 


Talbot 


495 


460 


29 


9 


33 


2 


68 


1 


60 


4 





2 






1 


8 


5 


7 









7 


Washington 


2,672 


2,503 


30 


5 


33 


6 


62 


6 


50 


2 





4 





2 


6 


1 


15 


4 





4 





6 


Wicomico . 


1,039 


962 


25 


7 


30 


8 


71 


9 


63 


3 





3 





1 





9 


5 


4 


1 


2 





4 


Worcester . 


543 


512 


23 


4 


30 


5 


74 


4 


54 


4 





5 





2 




3 


13 


9 





4 


1 






COLORED YOUTH 



Total and 














































Average . . . 


6,398 


6,181 


20 


3 


26 


1 


73 


2 


53 


8 





4 





1 


5 


5 


19 


3 





6 





7 


Allegany . . 


46 


50 


41 


3 


40 





56 


5 


54 













2 


2 


6 













A. Arundel 


780 


702 


17 


9 


21 


9 


75 





50 





6 


3 





i 


6 


5 


27 


4 


6 


3 


6 


6 


Baltimore . 


568 


530 


29 


4 


36 


6 


64 


1 


39 


8 





3 





2 


6 





23 








2 





4 


Calvert . . . 


257 


256 


11 


7 


21 


1 


79 


7 


46 


1 










7 


8 


32 








8 





8 


Caroline . . . 


167 


146 


21 


6 


30 


1 


71 


8 


57 


5 










5 


4 


11 





1 


2 


1 


4 


Carroll .... 


83 


81 


13 


3 


18 


5 


81 


9 


64 


2 


1 


2 






2 


4 


14 


8 


1 


2 


2 


5 


Cecil 


88 


83 


19 


3 


39 


8 


72 


7 


36 


1 


1 


2 






6 


8 


24 


1 










Charles . . . 


398 


394 


15 


3 


20 


1 


75 


9 


56 


8 





5 




5 


7 


8 


22 


1 


6 


5 





5 


Dorchester 


326 


304 


24 


9 


16 


8 


67 


5 


58 


9 





6 






5 


8 


23 


7 


1 


2 





6 


Frederick. . 


193 


219 


14 


5 


19 


2 


80 


3 


61 


2 










3 


1 


18 


7 


2 


1 





9 


Garrett . . . 














































Harford . . . 


'2i5 


'2i8 


30 


7 


26 


2 


62 


3 


61 


6 


i 


4 






4 


2 


li 


9 


i 


4 





9 


Howard . . . 


189 


159 


22 


7 


30 


2 


70 


4 


56 








5 






5 


3 


13 


2 


1 


1 





6 


Kent 


157 


164 


17 


9 


26 


8 


69 


4 


48 


2 





6 






12 


1 


24 


4 









6 


Montgomery 


410 


393 


24 


9 


36 


6 


63 


7 


38 













11 


2 


25 


4 





2 






Pr. George's 


926 


836 


21 


7 


30 


1 


72 


8 


53 


4 









1 


5 





15 


6 





5 





8 


Q. Anne's . . 


126 


128 


15 


1 


21 


1 


81 


7 


52 


3 


6 


8 






1 


6 


25 


8 





8 





8 


St. Mary's . 


301 


286 


12 


6 


18 


5 


80 




55 


3 


1 








7 


6 





23 


8 





3 


1 


7 


Somerset . . 


270 


273 


21 


9 


27 


8 


75 


9 


57 


1 










1 


5 


13 


6 





7 


1 


5 


Talbot 


218 


211 


19 


3 


32 


2 


76 


6 


46 








9 






2 


7 


21 


8 





5 






Washington 


65 


68 


29 


2 


35 


3 


66 


2 


61 


8 










4 


6 


2 


9 










Wicomico . 


310 


338 


18 


1 


21 


9 


78 


4 


70 


4 


i 


6 






1 


9 


7 


4 


6 


6 





3 


Worcester . 


305 


342 


10 


8 


17 


8 


87 


8 


75 


2 






6 


3 





7 


6 


1 





7 





6 



* Less than . 1 per cent. 



74 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 10— Opening and Closing Dates of Maryland Public Schools, 
Year Ending June 30, 1949 



County 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools in 
September, 
1948 



Date of 
Closing 
Schools in 
June, 
1949 



County 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools in 
September, 
1948 



Baltimore City 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore .... 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick. . . . 
Garrett 



Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



13 


10 


7 


17 


2 


9 


13 


17 


8 


16 


7 


3 


9 


15 


7 


3 


13 


10 


13 


17 


7 


3 


7 


3 



TABLE 11— Number of Maryland County Schools in Session Fewer Than 180 Days, 

Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Year or County 


Total Number 


Number Having 
One Teacher 


Number Larger 
Elementary Schools 


WHITE SCHOOLS 


1948 


4 


3 




1949 


5 


1 


4 


Dorchester 


2 


a2 




2 


bi 


cl 


Prince George's 


1 


61 








COLORED SCHOOLS 


1948 


2 




2 


1949 


1 




1 


Prince George's 


1 




cl 









a 179 days; and 175 days due to a clogged sewer. 
b 177 days. 
c 179 days. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



CHART 1 

Enrollment in Public Schools by Color; Counties of Maryland 
and Baltimore City: 1923-1949 



200 



175 



100 



75 



50 



25 



























/ 


/ 

/ 








>es - White 










■ - ,Jf' ■ ■ 


























Ba] 


timore City 


- White 


















Covuitiec 


> - Colored 
























^ Baltimoi 


e City - Col 


ored 








1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


["r"rr-rj 


r 1 1 1 1 1 



1925 1928 1955 1958 1945 1948 1955 



Year 



76 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 12 — Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color: Counties of 
Maryland and Baltimore City : 1940-1949 





Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Nonpublic Schools 


Year 
Ending 
June 30 


Counties*! 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties*! 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



1940 


162,992 


124,040 


147,646 


88,317 


11,911 


32,788 


3,435 


2,935 


1941 


166,058 


122,185 


149,969 


87,291 


12,578 


31,753 


3,511 


3,141 


1942 


169,579 


119,651 


152,449 


85,039 


13,319 


31,122 


3,811 


3,490 


1943 


172,317 


118,800 


154,701 


84,389 


13,770 


30,809 


3,846 


3,602 


1944 


171,917 


117,414 


153,158 


82,709 


14,721 


31,097 


4,038 


3,608 


1945 


174,113 


115,289 


154,502 


79,552 


15,192 


31,783 


4,419 


3,954 


1946 


17';,016 


113,021 


155,873 


77,086 


16,221 


31,571 


4,922 


4,364 


1947 


181,278 


112,648 


157,992 


76,471 


17,069 


31,608 


6,217 


4,569 


1948 


189,224 


114,688 


163,549 


77,702 


18,584 


31,935 


7,091 


5,051 


1949 


201,124 


116,220 


173,701 


78,762 


20,189 


32,457 


7,234 


5,001 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



1940 


29,146 


34,026 


28,627 


32,441 


519 


1,490 




95 


1941 


29,282 


34,703 


28,720 


33,169 


562 


1,447 




87 


1942 


28,965 


34,487 


28,356 


33,047 


609 


1,377 




63 


1943 .... 


28,769 


34,318 


28,137 


32,840 


632 


1,407 




71 


1944 


28,555 


34,804 


27,928 


33,189 


627 


1,539 




76 


1945 


29,061 


35,747 


28,431 


34,269 


630 


1,403 




75 


1946. . . . 


29,824 


37,034 


29,166 


35,465 


658 


1,476 




93 


1947. . . . 


30,882 


38,295 


30,032 


36,678 


750 


1,518 


100 


99 


1948 


31,717 


39,762 


30,875 


38,023 


783 


1,558 


59 


181 


1949 


33,039 


40,484 


32,226 


38,714 


792 


1,624 


21 


146 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates between counties in public schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



77 



TABLE 13 — Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color — Type of School: 
Counties of Maryland and Baltimore City: 1940-1949 





, Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Nonpublic Schools 


Year 
Ending 
June 30 


Counties*! 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties*! 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



WHITE elementary SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1940 


120,719 


96,947 


109,154 


66,896 


9,828 


27,947 


1,737 


2,104 


1941 . . . . 


121,933 


95,401 


110,021 


65,732 


10,082 


27,371 


1,830 


2,298 


1942. . . . 


124,973 


94,438 


112,294 


65,123 


10,643 


26,703 


2,036 


2,612 


1943 


128,436 


94,780 


115,253 


65,904 


11,059 


26,104 


2,124 


2,772 


1944 


129,828 


94,497 


115,586 


65,708 


11,797 


26,010 


2,445 


2,779 


1945. . . . 


131,549 


92,309 


116,611 


62,969 


12,162 


26,322 


2,776 


3,018 


1946 


118,579 


79,779 


102,148 


50,482 


13,187 


25,883 


3,244 


3,414 


1947 


119,771 


79,458 


101,784 


49,707 


13,888 


26,214 


4,099 


3,537 


1948 


126,280 


80,947 


105,790 


51,073 


15,290 


26,000 


5,200 


3,874 


1949. . . . 


135,045 


82,871 


112,996 


52,406 


16,803 


26,661 


5,246 


3,804 



WHITE HIGH AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1940. . . . 


42,273 


27,093 


38,492 


21,421 


2,083 


4,841 


1,698 


831 


1941. . . . 


44,125 


26,784 


39,948 


21,559 


2,496 


4,382 


1,681 


843 


1942. . . . 


44,606 


25,213 


40,155 


19,916 


2,676 


4,419 


1,775 


878 


1943 


43,881 


24,020 


39,448 


18,485 


2,711 


4,705 


1,722 


830 


1944. . . . 


42,089 


22,917 


37,572 


17,001 


2,924 


5,087 


1,593 


829 


1945 


42,564 


22,980 


37,891 


16,583 


3,030 


5,461 


1,643 


936 


1946 


58,437 


33,242 


53,725 


26,604 


3,034 


5,688 


1,678 


950 


1947 


61,507 


33,190 


56,208 


26,764 


3,181 


5,394 


2,118 


1,032 


1948 


62,944 


33,741 


57,759 


26,629 


3,294 


5,935 


1,891 


1,177 


1949 .... 


66,079 


33,349 


60,705 


26,356 


3,386 


5,796 


1,988 


1,197 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1940. . . . 


24,328 


29,877 


23,809 


28,408 


519 


1,393 




76 


1941. . . . 


24,114 


30,515 


23,552 


29,112 


562 


1,335 




68 


1942 


23,853 


30,546 


23,244 


29,247 


609 


1,249 




50 


1943. . . . 


23,505 


30,553 


22,873 


29,245 


632 


1,253 




55 


1944 


23,337 


31,254 


22,736 


29,857 


601 


1,334 




63 


1945. . . . 


23,825 


31,753 


23,195 


30,503 


630 


1,179 




71 


1946 


22,824 


29,044 


22,166' 


27,686 


658 


1,270 




88 


1947 


23,144 


29,448 


22,294 


28,018 


750 


1,334 


100 


96 


1948 


23,459 


30,539 


22,646 


28,996 


754 


1,375 


59 


168 


1949 


24,089 


31,033 


23,305 


29,466 


763 


1,421 


21 


146 



COLORED HIGH AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1940 


4,818 


4,149 


4,818 


4,033 




97 




19 


1941 


5,168 


4,188 


5,168 


4,057 




112 




19 


1942 


5,112 


3,941 


5,112 


3,800 




128 




13 


1943. . . . 


5,264 


3,765 


5,264 


3,595 




154 




16 


1944. . . . 


5,218 


3,550 


5,192 


3,332 


26 


205 




13 


1945 


5,236 


3,994 


5,236 


3,766 




224 




4 


1946 


7,000 


7,990 


7,000 


7,779 




206 




5 


1947 


7,738 


8,847 


7,738 


8,660 




184 




8 


1948 


8,258 


9,223 


8,229 


9,027 


29 


183 




13 


1949 


8,950 


9,451 


8,921 


9,248 


29 


203 







* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates between counties in public schools. 

For public and nonpublic enrollment in detail, see TABLES II, III, IV, and V. 



78 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 14— White Resident Births in Maryland: 1940-1949 

Data from Bureau Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore City. . . 

Total Counties . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's . . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



White Resident Births In Maryland 



1940 



25,438 
10,105 
15,333 

1,719 
846 

2,672 
119 
245 

596 
421 
210 
297 
889 

530 
570 
306 
166 
1,568 

1,429 
155 
244 
230 
216 

1,234 
460 
211 



1941 



29,521 

11,886 

17,635 

1,821 
1,080 
3,275 
112 
274 

610 

528 
270 
299 
972 

531 
662 
325 
156 
1,981 

1,851 
166 

225 
219 
207 

1,378 
452 
241 



1942 



35,911 

15,076 

20,835 

1,871 
1,360 
4,501 
115 

250 

686 
521 
343 
327 
1,009 

490 
1,042 
346 
155 
2,443 

2,276 
164 
282 
218 
196 

1,523 
482 
235 



1943 



38,749 

16,077 

22,672 

1,887 
1,487 
5,155 
147 

283 

716 

698 
382 
318 
1,067 

504 
1,081 
383 
156 
2,543 

2,672 
177 
336 
217 
216 

1,.530 
492 
225 



1944 



35,554 

14,021 

21,533 

1,665 
1,442 
4,862 
116 

265 

626 
638 
341 
318 
979 

464 
1,059 
354 
210 
2,459 

2,532 
170 
388 
209 
210 

1,479 
501 
246 



1945 



34,678 

13,308 

21,370 

1,691 
1,392 
4,751 
156 
248 



652 
304 
298 
1,029 

424 
994 
317 
166 
2,463 

2,529 
178 
540 
199 

220 

1,451 
471 
231 



1946 



41,401 

15,805 

25,596 

2,221 
1,693 
5,643 
137 
302 

816 
748 
386 
360 
1,254 

515 
1,133 
389 
214 
2,771 

3,273 
196 

475 
256 
235 

1,702 
571 
306 



1947 



46,324 

17,799 

28,525 

2,524 
1,943 
6,328 
156 
310 

930 
735 
394 
412 
1,338 

565 
1,244 
477 
240 
3,114 

3,448 
208 
557 
297 
296 

1,950 
684 
375 



1948 



42,651 

15,414 

27,237 

2,126 
2,020 
5,737 
179 
323 

840 
717 
405 
368 
1,196 

550 
1,186 
426 
216 
3,289 

3,605 
213 
564 
256 
271 

1,761 
663 
326 



Maryland State Department of Education 79 



TABLE 15— Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1940-1949 

Data from Bureau Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Colored Resident Births In Maryland 



County 


1940 


1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


Total State 


6,930 


7,605 


8,243 


8,604 


8,209 


8,138 


9,332 


10,503 


11,441 


11,870 


Baltimore City .... 


3,607 


4,109 


4,644 


4,977 


4.809 


4,540 


5,306 


6,193 


6,669 


6,989 


Total Counties .... 


3,323 


3,496 


3,599 


3,627 


3,400 


3,598 


4,026 


4,310 


4,772 


4,881 


Allegany 


32 


32 


41 


33 


24 


33 


36 


30 


34 


33 


Anne Arundel . . . 


423 


440 


471 


445 


415 


427 


471 


531 


583 


621 




232 


234 


248 


334 


250 


423 


497 


539 


638 


613 


Calvert 


137 


136 


143 


170 


164 


156 


176 


205 


216 


198 


Caroline 


91 


91 


98 


98 


84 


81 


85 


95 


97 


97 


Carroll 


45 


40 


64 


42 


41 


42 


44 


48 


47 


44 


Cecil 


46 


54 


49 


59 


44 


50 


56 


53 


73 


56 


Charles 


254 


278 


273 


279 


287 


301 


286 


292 


318 


333 


Dorchester 


184 


171 


187 


173 


164 


164 


166 


201 


206 


231 


Frederick 


115 


137 


115 


116 


108 


112 


151 


140 


143 


144 


Garrett 
















3 


1 




Harford 


88 


86 


98 


87 


li'i 


96 


li2 


141 


167 


1-77 




74 


81 


68 


87 


66 


64 . 


88 


88 


120 


99 


Kent 


94 


87 


96 


103 


90 


80 


81 


87 


77 


88 


Montgomery . . . 


202 


237 


223 


230 


215 


231 


302 


297 


311 


336 


Prince George's . 


425 


474 


482 


459 


452 


463 


531 


548 


638 


645 


Queen Anne's. . . 


88 


88 


92 


71 


69 


82 


73. 


81 


100 


115 


St. Mary's 


149 


151 


172 


204 


181 


168 


204 


179 


217 


209 


Somerset 


169 


183 


144 


176 


165 


158 


158 


187 


176 


200 


Talbot 


126 


125 


148 


107 


120 


110 


128 


129 


144 


136 


Washington .... 


37 


31 


39 


32 


25 


16 


28 


39 


30 


34 


Wicomico 


151 


183 


175 


161 


170 


165 


170 


191 


229 


233 


Worcester 


161 


157 


173 


161 


154 


176 


183 


206 


207 


239 



80 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 16 — Per Cent of Attendance in Maryland Elementary Schools for 
Years Ending June, 1948 and 1949 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


1948 


1949 


1948 


1949 


State Average 


*90 


8 


*91 





t=88 


7 


*89.7 


Baltimore City 


88 


2 


88 


5 


88 


3 


89.1 


County Average 


*92 





*92 


2 


♦89 


2 


*90.5 


Allegany 


*93 


7 


*94 


5 


88 





96.4 


Anne Arundel 


89 


7 


91 


1 


*89 





♦90.2 


Baltimore 


■^91 


5 


*91 


1 


88 


4 


89.4 


Calvert 


90 


1 


92 


4 


81 


4 


86.3 




93 


9 


94 


9 


91 





90.3 


Carroll 


92 


3 


92 


7 


83 


9 


86.1 


Cecil 


91 


7 


90 


5 


87 


6 


85.9 


Charles 


91 


1 


90 





86 





86.0 


Dorchester 


94 


4 


95 


2 


91 


2 


91.9 


Frederick 


93 


2 


92 


1 


88 


8 


90.0 


Garrett 


91 


8 


92 


5 










92 


2 


90 


8 


91 


2 


96^6 


Howard 


91 


9 


92 


1 


87 


5 


87.5 


Kent 


93 


6 


94 


1 


92 


6 


93.0 




90 


1 


91 


2 


88 


2 


90.4 


Prince George's 


92 


6 


93 





*90 


9 


*92.5 


Queen Anne's 


91 


6 


93 


3 


94 


7 


95.5 


St. Mary's 


90 


4 


91 


2 


8i 


2 


87.8 




93 


4 


93 


5 


90 


4 


91.5 


Talbot 


91 


7 


94 





93 


3 


95.3 


Washington 


92 


9 


93 





91 





93.2 




*93 


4 


*93 


2 


92 


2 


92.7 




92 


7 


93 





87 


4 


89.6 



For attendance in 1949 by type of organization, see TABLE IX. 

♦ Excludes attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges: 



Frostburg 95.3 95.2 

Towson 93.3 93.6 

Salisbury 94.0 92.7 

Bowie: 90.3 92.9 

Anne Arundel 87.7 92.6 

Prince George's 91.4 93.0 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



TABLE 17 



Per Cent of Attendance for School Years Ending in June 1948 and 1949 by Type of 

White Elementary School 



County 


Schools Having One- 
Teacher Organization 


Schools Having Two- 
Teacher Organization 


Schools Having Three- 
Teacher Organization 


Graded Schools 


1948 


1949 


1948 


1949 


1948 


1949 


1948 


1949 


County Average . . . 


92 


4 


92 


8 


92 


5 


93 





92 





93 





*92 





*92 


1 


Allegany 


95 


1 


97 


4 


95 


3 


94 


9 


96 


6 


97 


1 


♦93 


5 


*94 


4 


Anne Arundel. . . 










90 


1 


91 


8 


90 


3 


91 


5 


89 


6 


91 





Baltimore 










88 


2 


89 


2 


90 


3 


91 


9 


*91 


6 


*91 


1 


Calvert 










94 


4 


94 


9 


89 


7 


96 





89 


4 


91 


9 


Caroline 










91 


8 


94 


8 










94 


1 


94 


9 


Carroll 










92 


7 


93 


4 










92 


3 


92 


7 


Cecil 


93 


9 


92 


8 


92 





89 


5 










91 


6 


90 


5 


Charles 










94 


4 














91 


1 


90 





Dorchester 


94 


8 


95 





93 


8 


93 


8 










94 


5 


95 


4 


Frederick 


94 


6 


94 


6 


92 





90 


5 


90 


5 


9i 


7 


93 


4 


92 


2 


Garrett 


90 


7 


91 


4 


91 


2 


94 


2 


94 


3 


94 


3 


92 





92 


2 


Harford 


92 


6 


91 


6 


94 


6 


93 





92 


3 


90 


1 


92 





90 


7 


Howard 


87 


8 


93 


8 


92 


1 


93 













92 





92 





Kent 


94 


9 


94 


5 


91 


6 


93 


7 


90 


8 


91 


6 


94 


6 


94 


5 


Montgomery . . . 


88 


9 


81 


8 


91 


6 


90 


3 


90 


2 


93 


2 


90 





91 


2 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 


91 


4 


97 


3 


92 


5 


94 


7- 


94 


3 


91 


8 


92 


6 


92 


9 


91 


9 


93 


6 


91 


3 


94 





92 


5 


94 


5 


91 


4 


93 





St. Mary's 


89 


3 


91 


4 


90 


8 


91 


9 










90 


4 


90 


8 


Somerset 


94 


2 


» 94 


8 


91 


4 


93 


3 










93 


5 


93 


5 


Talbot 


92 





95 


1 


91 


1 


91 


5 


91 


7 


94 


2 


91 


8 


94 


1 


Washington .... 


95 


1 


94 


3 


93 


9 


93 


3 


92 


1 


93 


8 


92 


8 


93 





Wicomico 


95 


5 


93 


1 


94 


9 


95 


3 


94 





93 


7 


*93 


2 


*93 


1 


Worcester 










94 





94 


1 


93 


6 


93 


8 


92 


3 


92 


8 



* Excludes attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



82 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 18 — An Index of School Attendance in Maryland County Elementary Schools* 
for School Year Ending June 30, 1949 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


Per Cent of 


Per Cent of 


Attendance 
t 


Late 
Entrants^ 


With- 
drawals" 


Attendance 
t 


Late 
Entrants^: 


With- 
drawals° 


County Average 


92 


2 





2 





5 


90 


5 




4 





8 


Allegany 


94 


5 





2 





6 


96 


4 












91 


1 





3 





3 


90 


2 


1 


9 





6 


Baltimore 


91 


1 





1 





5 


89 


4 


1 


1 





8 


Calvert 


92 


4 





1 





5 


86 


3 


5 


1 


1 





Caroline 


94 


9 





2 





2 


90 


3 




8 





1 


Carroll 


92 


7 





1 





5 


86 


1 





3 


1 





Cecil 


90 


5 





4 





7 


85 


9 


1 


3 


1 


3 


Charles 


90 








3 





7 


86 





3 


4 





9 


Dorchester 


95 


2 





1 





9 


91 


9 





4 





7 


Frederick 


92 


1 









6 


90 








5 





2 


Garrett 


92 


5 









7 














Harford 


90 


8 


I 


I 





9 


90 


6 





4 





9 




92 


1 





3 





7 


87 


5 


1 








9 


Kent 


94 


1 










5 


93 





1 


4 


1 





Montgomery 


91 


2 





2 





8 


90 


t* 


1 


7 





6 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


93 








1 





5 


92 







3 





9 


93 


3 





1 





1 


95 


5 










St. Mary's 


91 


2 





7 





9 


87 


8 


4 








6 


Somerset 


93 


5 









6 


91 


5 


1 


6 


1 





Talbot 


94 








1 





4 


95 


3 





8 


1 


3 


Washington 


93 








1 





7 


93 


2 


1 









Wicomico 


93 


2 





1 


1 


4 


92 


7 





3 


1 


9 


Worcester 


93 








1 





8 


89 


6 





7 





4 



a Less than . 1 per cent. 

* Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 

t For per cent of attendance for all types of schools, see TABLE IX. 

t Late entrance for employment, indifference, or neglect. 

° Withdrawals for causes other than removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 



Maryland State Department of Education 83 



TABLE 19— Per Cent of Attendance in Maryland High Schools for Years 
Ending June, 1948 and 1949 



County 


White Schools 


Colored 


Schools 


1948 


1949 


1948 


1949 


State Average* 


92 


5 


92 


5 


91 


4 


90.5 


Baltirnore City* 


92 


2 


91 


7 


91 


1 


90.3 


County Average 


92 


g 


92 


9 


90 


9 


90.7 


Allegany 


94 


g 


95 


2 


95 





95.0 


Anne Arundel 


91 


4 


92 




87 


g 


84.9 


Baltimore . . . 


92 


3 


91 


8 


92 


7 


92.6 


Calvert 


92 


3 


92 


7 


89 


2 


91.8 


Caroline 


93 


9 


94 


2 


90 


2 


89.3 


Carroll 


93 


7 


94 


4 


90 


4 


89.8 


Cecil 


91 


2 


91 


4 


87 


5 


88.7 


Charles . . 


92 


1 


91 


7 


90 


3 


88.7 


Dorchester 


93 


7 


94 


5 


91 





91.5 


Frederick 


92 


9 


93 





94 


2 


93.8 


Garrett 


91 


2 


91 


9 










92 


9 


92 


7 


92 


3 


93.2 




92 


7 


93 


3 


91 


6 


91.4 


Kent 


92 


6 


92 


4 


94 


6 


94.3 


Montgomery 


92 





92 


6 


87 


8 


87.0 




92 


3 


92 


6 


91 





92.0 


Queen Anne's 


92 


4 


93 


5 


91 


9 


92.1 


St. Mary's 


90 


1 


91 


1 


87 


4 


85.4 


Somerset 


95 





94 


9 


93 


6 


92.5 


Talbot 


91 


8 


92 


7 


92 


1 


94.1 


Washington 


91 


8 


92 


2 


91 


9 


93.9 


Wicomico 


95 


2 


95 


1 


93 


2 


92.2 


Worcester 


93 


6 


93 


5 


90 


9 


92.3 



* Includes pupils in vocational schools. 

For attendance in 1949 by type of organization, see TABLE IX. 



TABLE 20— Number of Boys and Girls Enrolled by Grade-Color: Maryland County 
Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Gkade 


White and Colored 


White 


Colored 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


199,515 


101,553 


97,962 


167,976 


85,813 


82,163 


31,539 


15,740 


15,799 


Kindergarten . . 


2,206 


1,181 


1,025 


2,206 


1,181 


1,025 








1* 


25,765 


13,476 


12,289 


21,346 


11,149 


10,197 


4,419 


2,327 


2,092 


2 


22,280 


11,571 


10,709 


18,388 


9,521 


8,867 


3,892 


2,050 


1,842 


3 


20,975 


10,944 


10,031 


17,270 


8,989 


8,281 


3,705 


1,955 


1,750 


4 


19,693 


10,162 


9,531 


16,176 


8,379 


7,797 


3,517 


1,783 


1,734 




19,522 


9,995 


9,527 


16,169 


8,338 


7,831 


3,353 


1,657 


1,696 


6 


18,162 


9,348 


8,814 


15,269 


7,891 


7,378 


2,893 


1,457 


1,436 


7t 


17,349 


8,999 


8,350 


14,640 


7,643 


6,997 


2,709 


1,356 


1,353 


8t 


15,413 


7,658 


7,755 


13,073 


6,602 


6,471 


2,340 


1,056 


1,284 


9/1 


13,720 


6,775 


6,945 


11,863 


5,907 


5,956 


1,857 


868 


989 


10/11 


11,199 


5,184 


6,015 


9,718 


4,548 


5,170 


1,481 


636 


845 


11 /III 


5,566 


2,671 


2,895 


5,045 


2,450 


2,595 


521 


221 


300 


12/IVt 


7,181 


3,231 


3,950 


6,348 


2,871 


3,477 


833 


360 


473 


Special Classes . 


484 


358 


126 


465 


344 


121 


19 


14 


5 



Enrollment excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death or commitment to an institution; also 
enrollment in elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 
* Includee enrollment in junior first grade. 

t Includes enrollment in elementary and junior high schools. 

t Includes 21 white boys, 13 white girls who were post-graduates. 



84 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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85 



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»H CO 



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■ ointo • Tf to lo CO 00 CO 

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t>oocootocoeootooo • t-i to tj< co co co m co o ec co 
o in CO 00 00 eo ■ o> m m o co »-i m i> co co o t- 

tH 0> 00 CO CO r-l rH CO CO ■ CO CO CO tO CO CO CO CO i-l "'l' 



•OOOi -tot- 



oint~inco<-itocO'^t> 
cot>i-(Cot>cococ-coin 



05000i— IdOOOOt-CO'^ 

T-ico'^'^t-co'^'-icooo 

Tj* 1-1 CO «H 



• ■>*to-*t>T-it>ooooco'-iin-<a< 
■ooot>^»Htoo^^<eoeo^ 



coot-ooinoi-icooo 
cot>.-ia5ooin-<fcoinoi 

rt<Tf rH COiH 



■ i-iinmt>inooomcococooo 
■i-ixtoi-icooooc-^ocointo 

■T-l com T-lrH iHrH 



om-*oomoooin-rj<o 

COOOtOrfOS-^tOtOmi-l 



•t-t>.-iTt<inT)<THCOto«ocoo 
•oooooTt<Tj<t>,-ito.-<com-* 

■T-<. com rHt-lrH rH r-l 



to-^cooscotocomooo 
coa50otoo5eo'*a>m.-i 

■^t-'trH COrHrH 



•totomojmtoi-imQxait^ 
■T-(O500-^mt>coc-cceotom 

■rH com ,-lrH,-l rH i-l 



O5'^t>eo-«#ooa>'-it>co 
cotoooi-(otomi-it>a5 

mTfCOtH COrH 



•COCOOOeOtOrfcOOOtOOiOSi-l 

•eorHoocoasoomc-toeoocm 

■r-<i-l com i-li-li-l .-Ir-I 



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rH - ••eOrH 



to 00 00 



m CO CO 



to t> OS t> t> CO CO m CO • CO 00 m m CO CO CO 05 ^ o .-I 
moicoocot-oioicoo • to m t> t> Tt t> m as ^ co 
i-( oi to 05 m CO CO m o to ■ to m m co to oi t> i-i <-! as 



to 1-1 



eomi-iTi<coo5toeo.HO 
to-^oscoooot-eorHTi* 
CO as^Tf eo__oc eo o 

Oo'co'rH Co'lH 



■c»5Tj<o>t>mTt<ooco.-ieoeom 
■mi-icot>tooococotD.-i.-(ai 
•oooorHTftooiTjioeomco 



C ojS o 



03 " 



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a 
a 

iCO £ 



c c 



:S.2 

0) t- £3 



a 
-u eo 
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.S d 3 



86 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 23 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade* in Maryland 
County White and Colored Schools, Year Ending June 30, 1949 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


First Grade Nonpromotions 


First Grade Nonpromotions 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties: 
























1948 


662 


392 


6 


7 


4 


3 


375 


246 


16 


8 


12.2 


1949 


769 


411 


6 


9 


4 





345 


218 


14 


8 


10.4 


Allegany 


65 


39 


8 


1 


5 


1 


1 




5 







Anne Arundel 


103 


42 


11 


8 


5 





48 


3i 


16 


4 


11.4 


Baltimore 


98 


55 


4 


6 


2 


9 


27 


13 


11 


1 


5.3 


Calvert 


6 


3 


7 


5 


4 


5 


28 


15 


26 


7 


13.9 


Caroline 


15 


8 


9 


7 


5 


7 


5 


5 


10 


6 


8.6 


Carroll 


2 


4 





5 


1 


2 


1 




3 







Cecil 


29 


14 


9 


3 


4 


4 


10 


'2 


25 


6 


7 ".4 


Charles 


17 


6 


10 


3 


4 


1 


27 


23 


15 


6 


16.7 


Dorchester 


9 


7 


5 


1 


3 


6 


12 


9 


12 


6 


11.0 


Frederick 


23 


15 


5 


1 


3 





1 


2 


2 





4.7 


Garrett 


7 


5 


2 


1 


1 


9 












Harford 


49 


44 


9 


9 


9 


4 


'2 


"4 


2 


5 


7^5 




18 


11 


8 


7 


6 


3 


10 


17 


19 


6 


27.9 


Kent 


13 


6 


13 


8 


7 





2 




3 


8 






129 


49 


9 


8 


4 


7 


40 


22 


24 


8 


13.6 


Prince George's 


112 


66 


7 


4 


4 


9 


56 


25 


17 


4 


9 1 


Queen Anne's 


3 


1 


2 


8 


1 















St. Mary's 


15 


2 


13 


5 


2 


1 


25 


i9 


33 


8 


24.4 


Somerset 




1 









8 


10 


9 


9 


3 


11.5 


Talbot 


'i 


2 


6 


4 


1 


7 


18 


12 


23 


4 


13.5 


Washington 


22 


16 


3 





2 


2 


2 


2 


10 





10.5 


Wicomico 


26 


15 


9 


6 


5 


5 


15 


4 


11 


9 


4.0 




1 







6 






5 


4 


5 





5.7 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, but includes pupils 
in junior first grade. 



/ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



TABLE 24 — Causes for Nonpromotion of Countv White Elementary Pupils* Not 
Promoted by Year 1940-1949, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1949 







Per Cent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 










ance 






>, 


CD 






Year 


Total 






'O 




0) 


'G 


CO ?? 






County 


Not 
Promotpd 


m 


c 


a 

aj 


ranee 


> 
O 


ncapa 


ate H 
ms an 
Interi 


from 
Schoi 


% 
3 






% 








CO >» 








at 






Caul 


rsona 


egula 
ot D 
ckne! 


c 


Year 


'ntal 


fortu 
ondit 
ack o 




U 


















5^- 


^< 


o 



BY YEAR 



1939-40 


11,057 


10 


5 









9 





2 


0.5 


1 


6 


4 


2 





7 


1 


3 


1940-41 


10,685 


10 


1 






1 








2 


0.6 


1 


3 


3 


8 





6 


1 


5 


1941-42 


10,287 


9 


6 






1 








2 


0.6 


1 


1 


3 


7 





6 


1 


3 


1942-43 


11,255 


10 


3 






1 


3 





2 


0.6 


1 


1 


3 


9 





6 


1 


5 


1943-44 


10,585 


9 


8 






1 








o 


0.5 


1 





4 








5 


1 


5 


1944-45 


8,083 


7 


3 





9 





9 





1 


0.4 





7 


2 


8 





3 


1 


2 


1945-46t 


4,852 


5 








6 





4 





1 


0.2 





5 


1 


9 





3 


1 





1946-47t 


3,040 


3 


1 





5 





2 





1 


0.1 





3 


1 


2 





2 





5 


1947-48t 


3,027 


3 








4 





2 





1 







4 


1 


2 





2 





5 


1948-49t 


3,327 


3 


1 





4 





2 





1 


t 





3 


1 


2 





2 





7 



BY COUNTY 1948-49t 



Allegany 


217 


2 


5 





2 


0.2 


X 




0.4 





7 


1 





9 


Anne Arundel 


388 


4 


8 





4 


0.4 


0.2 




0.4 


2 


5 


0.2 





7 


Baltimore 


352 


1 


8 





3 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


X 





5 


0.1 





6 


Calvert 


15 


2 








1 


0.3 


0.1 









3 




1 


2 


Caroline 


68 


4 


5 





4 


0.1 






0.8 





8 


0.1 


2 


3 


Carroll 


72 


1 


8 





2 


t 




0.1 


0.4 





7 


0.3 





1 


Cecil 


165 


5 


7 


1 





0.2 


0.1 


0.1 


1.3 


2 





+ 


1 





Charles 


83 


5 


4 





9 


0.4 


0.1 


0.1 


0.6 


1 


4 


o''3 


1 


6 


Dorchester 


41 


2 


2 





3 




0.1 









8 


X 


1 





■ Frederick 


84 


1 


6 





5 








O.i 





9 


0.1 






Garrett 


63 


1 


9 





7 








0.2 


1 











Harford 


185 


4 


2 





5 


0.4 


0.1 


0^1 


0.2 


2 


1 


0^1 





7 


Howard 


97 


5 








5 


0.7 


0.4 


0.2 


0.5 


2 





0.3 





4 


Kent 


49 


5 








3 




0.2 




0.2 


3 


2 


0.1 


1 





Montgomery 


406 


3 


1 





3 


o'.i 


0.2 




0.2 





9 


0.2 


1 


2 


Prince George's 


486 


3 


6 





5 


0.1 


0.1 


: 


0.4 


1 


4 


0.2 





9 


Queen Anne's 


23 


2 








3 










1 




0.1 





1 


St. Mary's 


66 


6 








3 


1.1 








2 


2 


0.2 


2 


2 


Somerset 


71 


5 


4 





4 


0.1 






O.i 


2 


5 


0.3 


2 





Talbot 


53 


4 


2 





3 




0^1 






2 


1 


0.4 


1 


3 


Washington 


98 


1 


3 





2 


o.i 


0.1 


x' 


o'.i 





5 


X 





2 




231 


7 


6 





7 


0.1 




0.4 


1.2 


4 





0.5 





7 


Worcester 


14 





9 





2 


0.1 






0.1 





4 


0.1 







* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Prior to 1946 grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 
X Less than . 1 per cent. 



88 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 25 — Causes for Nonpromotion of County Colored Elementary Pupils* Not 
Promoted by Year 1940-1949, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Year 
County 



Total 
Not 
Promoted 



Per Cent op Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 



BY YEAR 



1939-40 


4,832 


16 


6 


1 


5 


3 


2 


0,6 


1.0 





9 


7 


7 





8 





9 


1940-41 


3,663 


16 


1 


1 


8 


3 





0.5 


1.0 





9 


7 








7 


1 


2 


1941-42 


3,645 


16 


2 


1 


4 


3 


1 


0.4 


0.9 





9 


7 


5 





6 


1 


4 


1942-43 


3,891 


17 


6 


1 


5 


4 


4 


0.3 


1.0 





9 


7 


5 





5 


1 


5 


1943-44 


3,788 


17 


2 


1 


7 


4 


2 


0.5 


0.8 





9 


7 


3 





7 


1 




1944-45 


3,464 


15 


2 


1 


2 


3 


8 


0.4 


0.7 





8 


6 


8 





6 





9 


1945-46t. 


2,491 


n 





1 


2 


3 


1 


0.3 


0.4 





5 


4 


5 






1 





1946-47t 


2,043 


9 


4 


1 





2 


3 


0.3 


0.3 





5 


4 


1 





3 





6 


1947-48t 


1,793 


8 


2 





9 


1 


9 


0.3 


0.3 





4 


3 


6 





2 





6 


1948-49t 


1,640 


7 


2 





7 




4 


0.2 


0.1 





3 


3 


9 





3 





3 



BY COUNTY 1948-49t 





1 





6 























6 










Anne Arundel 


273 


9 


1 


1 





2 








2 


0.1 





3 


4 


7 





6 





2 


Baltimore 


95 


3 


6 





7 





6 





1 


0.1 






1 


7 





2 





2 


Calvert 


153 


15 


4 





2 


4 


3 





3 


0.5 





2 


8 


5 





5 





9 


Caroline 


50 


9 


5 


1 


1 





8 





4 







2 


7 













Carroll 


5 


1 


8 





4 









4 








1 













Cecil 


25 


8 


5 






2 


7 


1 


4 







7 


3 


4 









3 


Charles 


184 


11 


6 





6 


4 


5 





6 


o.i 





2 


4 


7 





6 





3 


Dorchester 


45 


4 


4 





4 









1 


0.1 






2 


4 





1 


1 


3 


Frederick 


6 


1 








5 















2 





3 










Garrett 






































Harford 


' 25 


3 


8 





7 





4 





3 







2 


2 


6 









2 


Howard 


43 


7 


7 


1 


1 


1 


4 





5 


0.4 






3 


9 





4 






Kent 


20 


4 


2 













2 







6 


3 


4 










Montgomery 


130 


8 


2 





6 


2 


6 





2 


O.i 





9 


3 


7 





3 





4 


Prince George's 


240 


7 


4 





9 





9 





3 


X 





3 


4 


3 





4 





2 








































St. Mary's 


101 


14 


9 


1 


6 


4 


6 







o.i 






7 


3 





6 


1 


2 


Somerset 


51 


5 


3 





4 





7 





1 


0.2 





i 


2 


7 






1 


1 


Talbot 


68 


9 


1 





3 





.1 





1 


0.1 






7 


8 





3 





4 




4 


2 


1 





5 






1 


1 











5 












86 


7 


8 





7 










0.4 


1 


1 


4 


7 





7 





2 


Worcester 


35 


3 


8 





8 















1 


2 


9 











* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Prior to 1946 grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 

% Less than . 1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



TABLE 26 — Program for Education of Physically Handicapped Children in Maryland 
Financed with State Funds: 1948-49 



County 


Total 


Home Teaching 


Transportation to 
Regular Classes 


Instruction in 
Special Schools 


Pupils 


Expendi- 
tures 


Pupils 


Teach- 
ers 


Expendi- 
tures 


Pupils 


Expendi- 
tures 


Pupils 


Expendi- 
tures 


Total State . . . 


616 


*$35,000.00 


346 


128 


$14,938.12 


41 


$4,538.51 


2 


29 


$9,687.53 


Baltimore City 


272 


6,255.70 


172 


10 




7 


1,779.35 


t93 




t4,476.35 


Total Counties 


344 


22,908.46 


174 


118 


14,938.12 


34 


2,759.16 


tl04 


32 


5,221.18 


Allegany . . 
AnneArundel 
Baltimore . . 
Calvert 


46 
31 

83 
3 


3,478.85 
2,223.72 
6,083.37 


16 
17 
37 


9 
7 
20 


1,825.10 
1,540.61 
3,003.59 


16 
3 
6 


1,653.75 
158.11 
242.90 


14 

8 
24 
3 


3 
16 


525.00 
2,836.88 


Caroline .... 


1 














1 






Carroll 


11 


1,115.70 
570.12 


9 


6 


1,025.65 
570.12 


1 


90.05 








Cecil 


7 


7 


6 










Charles 


2 










2 






Dorchester. . 
Frederick. . . 


8 
10 


733.15 
511.60 


'l 

5 


7 
4 


733.15 
390.10 


1 


121.50 


1 

4 






Garrett ... . 
Harford .... 
Howard .... 
Kent 


4 
4 
6 


200.00 
145.41 
143.04 
107.64 


2 
2 
1 


2 
2 
1 


145.41 
143.04 
107.64 


1 


200.00 


3 
2 
4 






Montgomery 


38 


2,979.38 


26 


13 


1,743.55 


2 


20.75 


3 


'7 


1,215.08 


Pr. George's 
QueenAnne's 
St. Mary's . . 
Somerset . . . 
Talbot 


39 
4 
5 
3 
2 


2,378.71 
73.08 
313.49 
326.00 
216.72 


22 
1 
1 
2 
2 


17 

1 

2 
2 


1,598.39 
73.08 
187.49 
326.00 
216.72 


3 
1 


146.10 
126.00 


8 
3 
3 
1 


6 


634.22 


Washington . 
Wicomico. . . 
Worcester . . 


18 
12 
6 


764.00 
398.98 
145.50 


7 
8 
2 


7 
9 
2 


764.00 
398.98 
145.50 






11 
4 
4 







* Includes a nonallocable amount of $5,835.84 expended for State-wide clinical services and audiometric examina- 
tions. 

t Salaries paid for the instruction of 197 children in Baltimore City hospital schools, of whom 93 children were from 
Baltimore City and the remainder from the counties. 



90 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 27— Special Classes for Retarded Children in Maryland Counties, 1948-49 





Number 




Average 


County 


of 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 




Classes 




per Class 




WHITE 






1947-48 


46 


861 


18.7 


1948-49 


27 


465 


17.2 




*10 


156 


15.6 


Anne Arundel 


2 


44 


22.0 


Caroline 


2 


38 


19.0 


Carroll 


t2 


40 


20.0 


Cecil 


1 


17 


17.0 


Dorchester : 


2 


16 


8.0 


Prince George's 




17 


17.0 


Somerset 




18 


18.0 


Washington 




85 


21.3 






17 


17.0 


Worcester 




17 


17.0 



COLORED 



1947-48 




22 


22 





1948-49 


1 


19 


19 







1 


19 


19 












* One school had one class; two schools each had two classes, and one school had five classes, 
t One school had two classes. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



TABLE 28 

Baltimore City Special Classes and Highwood School for Semester 
Ending June 30, 1949 



Kind of Class 


Number of 
Classes 


Net Roll 


Average 
Net Roll 


Per Cent of 
Attendance 


physicall 


Y HANDICAP] 


^ED WHITE P 


UPILS 





Total and Average . 



Orthopedic 

Sight Conservation . . . 
Hearing Conservation . 

Deaf 

Mixed* 




90.2 

90.1 
85.1 
95.0 
90.0 
91.2 



PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 





10 


140 


140 


87 


1 




5 


72 


73 


87 


6 


Sight Conservation 


3 


46 


44 


93 


1 


Hearing Conservation 


1 


12 


10 


70 





Deaf 




10 


13 


76 


9 



SOCIALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 



Highwood School . 



67 



67 



70.2 



MENTALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 





96 


1,848 


2,036 


80 


4 




63 


1,203 


1,346 


83 


4 


Special Center 


1 


19 


19 


84 


2 


Shop Center 


32 


626 


671 


74 


2 


MENTALLY 


HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 






Total and Average 


101 


2,006 


1,985 


77 


9 




57 


1,165 


1,141 


79 


2 


Special Center 


2 


37 


36 


77 




Shop Center 


42 


804 


808 


76 


1 



* Junior high school class consisting of pupils with the following deficiencies: Orthopedic, 26; Sight 
Conservation, 7; Cardiac, 15; Deaf, 4; Hearing, 4; and Special, 1. 



92 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 29--Graduates of Maryland County High Schools by Color-Sex-Year, 
1940-1949, and by Color-Sex-County and Baltimore City for Year 
Ending June 30, 1949 



Year Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


^ Total 


Boys 


Girls 






BY 


YEAR 








1940 


6,813 


3,017 


3,796 


*673 


*245 


*428 


1941 


7,038 


3,168 


3,870 


*708 


*249 


*459 


1942 


7,176 


3,165 


4,011 


*659 


*256 


*403 


1943 


6,741 


2,887 


3,854 


*689 


*271 


*418 


1944 


6,550 


2,493 


4,057 


718 


271 


447 


1945 


6,531 


2,545 


3,986 


755 


279 


476 


1946 


6,809 


2,641 


4,168 


740 


268 


472 . 


1947 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


937 


357 


580 


1948 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


889 


391 


498 


1949 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


780 


342 


438 


BY COUNTY AND BALTIMORE CITY, 1949 


Total State 


9,109 


4,286 


4,823 


1,410 


563 


847 


Baltimore City 


2,918 


1,486 


1,432 


630 


221 


409 


Total Counties 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


780 


342 


438 


Allegany 


768 


338 


430 


14 


6 


8 


Anne Arundel 


85 


49 


36 


4 




3 




1,260 


525 


735 


88 


35 


53 


Calvert 


54 


20 


34 


32 


13 


19 


Caroline 


175 


86 


89 


44 


15 


29 


Carroll 


364 


162 


202 


14 


5 


9 


Cecil 


228 


98 


130 


27 


14 


13 


Charles 


148 


68 


80 


70 


31 


39 


Dorchester 


192 


84 


108 


74 


45 


29 


Frederick 


7 


4 


3 








Garrett 


217 


99 


118 








Harford 


349 


160 


189 


52 


'27 


'25 




142 


71 


71 


28 


8 


20 


Kent 


114 


46 


68 


28 


12 


16 


Montgomery 


t726 


t327 


t399 


70 


29 


41 


Prince George's 


156 


79 


77 


2 


2 




Queen Anne's 


103 


46 


57 


27 


11 


16 


St. Mary's 


71 


33 


38 


31 


13 


18 


Somerset 


109 


59 


50 


61 


29 


32 


Talbot 


139 


70 


69 


48 


17 


31 


Washington 


573 


263 


310 


13 


6 


7 


Wicomico 


50 


34 


16 








Worcester 


161 


79 


82 


53 


23 


'30 



* Includes Baltimore County graduates who attended Baltimore City high schools at the expense of 
Baltimore County. 

t Includes 16 boys and 10 girls, graduates of 1949 Summer School. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



S3 



TABLE 30— Number and Per Cent of Maryland County High School Graduates Who 
Entered State Teachers Colleges Fall after Graduation, 1940-1949 





White 


Colored 




High School 


Entrants to State Teachers 


High School 


Entrants to State Teachers 




Graduates 


Colleges Fall Following 


Graduate*? 


Colleges Fall Following 










Graduation 










Graduation 




Year 
































Number 


Per Cent 






Number 


Per Cent 




Boys 


Girls 










Boys 


Girls 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1940. . 


3,017 


3,796 


61 


141 


2.0 


3.7 


*245 


*428 


8 


*40 


3.3 


9.3 


1941. . 


3,168 


3,870 


36 


126 


1.1 


3 3 


*249 


*459 


5 


22 


2.1 


5.0 


1942. . 


3,165 


4,011 


37 


74 


1.2 


1.8 


*256 


*403 




*25 




6.2 


1943. . 


2,887 


3,854 


23 


88 


0.8 


2 3 


*271 


*418 


8 


20 


3.0 


4.8 


1944. . 


2,493 


4,057 


15 


72 


1.7 


1.8 


271 


447 


6 


32 


4.5 


7.2 


1945. . 


2,545 


3,986 


23 


118 


0.9 


3.0 


279 


476 


5 


37 


1.8 


7.8 


1946. . 


2,641 


4,168 


53 


151 


2.0 


3.6 


268 


472 


8 


28 


3.0 


5.9 


1947. . 


3,244 


4,199 


121 


148 


3.7 


3.5 


357 


580 


11 


39 


3.1 


6.7 


1948. . 


3,417 


4,242 


105 


245 


3.1 


5.8 


391 


498 


8 


32 


2.0 


6.4 


1949. . 


2,800 


3,391 


141 


249 


5.0 


7.3 


342 


438 


19 


66 


5.6 


15.1 



* Includes residents of Baltimore County who graduated from Baltimore City high schools after five 
years work above grade 7. 

For 1949 graduates and Teachers College entrants for individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



94 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 31 — Comparison of Number and Per Cent of County High School Graduates 
Continuing Education or Staving or Working at Home Year Following Graduation, 

1940-1949 









Number 


Per Cent 


Graduates of 


Total Number 
of Graduates 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE 



1939 


2,750 


3,556 


761 


1,118 


254 


1,133 


27 


7 


31 


4 


9 


2 


31 


9 


1940 


3,017 


3,796 


699 


1,107 


147 


916 


23 


1 


29 


1 


4 


9 


24 


1 


1941 


3,168 


3,870 


621 


1,006 


115 


773 


19 


6 


26 





3 


6 


20 





1942 


3,165 


4,011 


539 


832 


24 


540 


17 





20 


7 





8 


13 


5 


1943 


2,887 


3,854 


313 


953 


8 


434 


10 


8 


24 


8 





3 


11 


3 


1944 


2,493 


4,057 


338 


1,177 


12 


448 


13 


6 


29 








5 


11 





1945 


2,545 


3,986 


434 


1,232 


19 


587 


17 


1 


30 


9 





7 


14 


7 


1946 


2,641 


4,168 


601 


1,218 




420 


22 


7 


29 


3 


1 


4 


16 


9 


1947 


*3,255 


*4.205 


901 


1,268 


'77 


769 


27 


7 


30 


2 


2 


4 


18 


3 


1948 


13,419 


4,242 


865 


1,282 


68 


277 


25 





30 





2 





6 


5 


COLORED 


1939 


227 


333 


56 


78 


12 


86 


24 


6 


23 


4 


5 


3 


25 


9 


1940 


236 


413 


44 


90 


11 


68 


18 


6 


21 


8 


4 


7 


16 


5 


1941 


236 


444 


42 


76 


3 


75 


17 


8 


17 


2 




3 


16 


9 


1942 


247 


385 


32 


89 


1 


77 


12 


8 


25 


4 





4 


20 





1943 


263 


401 


26 


118 




46 


9 


9 


29 


4 






11 


5 


1944 


271 


447 


53 


145 


1 


52 


19 


6 


32 


4 


6 


4 


11 


7 


1945 


279 


476 


84 


183 


2 


59 


30 


1 


38 


4 





7 


12 


4 


1946 


268 


472 


60 


159 


9 


91 


22 


3 


33 


7 


3 


3 


19 


3 


1947 


357 


580 


67 


166 


14 


124 


18 


8 


28 


6 


3 


9 


21 


4 


1948 


391 


498 


82 


162 


13 


85 


20 


9 


32 


5 


3 


3 


17 






* Number of white graduates for 1946-47, as shown on TABLES 29 and 30 is not in agreement with 
number given on TABLE 31. TABLES 29 and 30 include the '46 summer school graduates of Mont- 
gomery County while TABLE 31 excludes these and includes the '47 summer school graduates instead. 
This was necessary because of a change in method of reporting summer school graduates. 

t Includes two boys who received diplomas after June 1948 and were not reported previously. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



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Total Counties. . . 

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Anne Arundel. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Carrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince Ceorge's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



102 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 39— Enrollment* in Each Year of Maryland County High Schools by Year, 

1940-1949 



Year 




Grade 


Ending 


Total 














June 30 




7 


8 


9-1 


10-11 


ll-III 1 12-IV 


Post- 
















graduate 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



1940 


37,858 






12,206 


10,073 


8,352 


7,041 


186 


1941 


39,225 






12,554 


10,342 


7,848 


7,323 


158 


1942 


39,316 






12,496 


10,440 


8,804 


7,515 


61 


1943 ... 


38,394 






12,543 


10,087 


8,579 


7,161 


24 


1944 


36,797 






12,124 


9,764 


8,065 


6,833 


11 


1945. . . . 


37,154 






12,314 


9,842 


8,201 


6,783 


14 


1946. . . . 


51,922 


10,745 


6,397 


9,305 


10,090 


8,393 


6,967 


25 


1947 


54,886 


12,025 


11,667 


6,613 


8,043 


8,846 


7,629 


63 


1948 


56,524 


12,445 


12,448 


10,960 


• 5,571 


7,166 


7,897 


37 


1949. . . . 


59,500 


13,576 


12,950 


11,863 


9,718 


5,045 


6,314 


34 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



1940 


4,740 






1,834 


1,234 


979 


691 


2 


1941 


5,045 






1,961 


1,349 


953 


780 


2 


1942 


5,009 






1,857 


1,450 


994 


708 




1943 


5,159 






1,865 


1,422 


1,088 


784 




1944. . . . 


5,083 






1,957 


1,333 


1,004 


789 


... 


1945 


5,138 






1,804 


1,518 


1,016 


799 




1946. . . . 


6,899 


1,015 


818 


1,590 


1,475 


1,198 


803 




1947. . . . 


7,624 


1,238 


1,823 


1,186 


1,178 


1,178 


1,021 




1948 


8,173 


1,608 


2,128 


1,829 


639 


999 


969 


i 


1949 


8,853 


1,821 


2,340 


1,857 


1,481 


521 


833 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
For enrollment of individual high schools see TABLE XXII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



TABLE 40 — White Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses in Maryland County 
High Schools for the Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Entglish 



County 


7t 


8t 


9t 


10 


11 / III 


12/ IV 


OtherJ 


Total Counties 


1 Q iOQ 


12,968 


11,908 


y ,ou ( 


0,UU4 




1 fii a 


Allegany 


1,316 


1,190 


1,1d3 


976 


860 


763 


1 .->o 

123 


Anne Arundel . . 


967 


907 


835 


653 


538 


91 


21 


Baltimore 


2,629 


2,331 


2,013 


1,575 


282 


1,326 


391 


Calvert 


111 


77 


95 


11 


79 


54 




Caroline 


217 


212 


158 


181 




188 


20 


Carroll 


592 


543 


463 


369 




412 


97 


Cecil 


430 


397 


359 


288 




267 


38 


Charles 


210 


188 


195 


134 




156 




Dorchester 


255 


264 


251 


148 




215 


48 




668 


717 


642 


509 


448 


1 


21 


Garrett 


131 


351 


291 


257 


3 


237 


12 


Harford 


478 


486 


462 


401 


29 


380 




Howard 


285 


215 


191 


172 


2 


156 




Kent 


133 


120 


119 


93 




125 


26 


Montgomery . . . 


1,308 


1,204 


1,117 


1,050 


891 


738 


870 


Prince George's 


1,719 


1,596 


1,444 


1,217 


923 


164 


44 


Queen Anne's. . . 


184 


145 


115 


111 




104 




St. Mary's 


135 


129 


143 


103 


28 


85 




Somerset 


198 


163 


169 


136 




110 




Talbot 


196 


169 


163 


173 




143 




Washington .... 


1,047 


1,019 


1,060 


845 


682 


597 


ioi 


Wicomico 




351 


309 


237 


234 


44 




Worcester 


219 


194 


161 


168 




168 





TABLE 41 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses in Maryland 
County High Schools for the Year Ending June 30, 1949 



English 



County 


7t 


8t 


9t 


10 


11 /III 


12 /IV 


Total Counties 


1,833 


2,323 


1,853 


1,484 


530 


838 


Allegany 


23 


19 


20 


15 


15 


15 


Anne Arundel 


173 


239 


231 


177 


139 




Baltimore 


230 


252 


151 


124 




'95 


Calvert 


93 


83 




70 


50 


34 


Caroline 


74 


62 


'53 


38 




50 


Carroll 


35 


29 


22 


12 




14 


Cecil 


44 


43 


43 


24 




29 


Charles 


68 


104 


94 


88 




72 


Dorchester 




110 


118 


77 




81 


Frederick 


'44 


63 


53 


45 


32 




Garrett 














Harford 


loi 


86 


"77 


70 




■57 


Howard 


56 


66 


62 


41 




32 


Kent 


69 


68 


46 


41 




30 


Montgomerv 




164 


146 


123 


93 


75 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


344 


336 


249 


162 


129 




64 


56 


36 


35 




27 


St. Mary's 


52 


76 


54 


35 




38 


Somerset 


122 


121 


86 


76 




68 


Talbot 


85 


64 


72 


49 




52 


Washington 


27 


29 


22 


15 


17 


14 


Wicomico 




132 


128 


87 


55 




Worcester 


129 


121 


90 


80 




55 



* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 

t Includes 559 taking Journalism; 350 taking Public Speaking; 253 taking Dramatics; 56 taking Radio 
Workshop; 25 taking English V; 32 taking Business English; and 543 taking Basic Language. 



104 



Eighty-Third 



Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



TABLE 43 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Social Studies in the Maryland 

County High Schools, 1948-49 



C OUNTY 



1947- 48 , 

1948- 49 . 



Social Studies 



1,638 
1,827 



2,044 
2,312 



1,384 
1,606 



645 
1,092 



928 
858 



oQ 



678 
383 



252 
186 



356 
214 



180 



79 
141 



77 



BY COUNTY 1948-49 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



23 


19 


20 




15 


30 
















173 


239 


231 


177 




139 
















230 


252 


199 


124 




47 
















92 


83 




76 




47 


18 














74 


62 


53 


38 






42 














35 


29 


22 








26 














40 


34 


32 


is 




29 
















69 


104 


94 


88 






72 
















110 




23 






21 




120 










44 


63 




45 




32 
















loi 


86 


77 


70 




26 


3i 




37 










56 


66 


62 


40 




32 
















69 


68 


46 


41 




30 






30 












164 


146 


63 




94 


23 














342 


338 


249 


142 




129 
















64 


54 


36 


35 






27 














52 


76 


54 






46 






27 










122 


121 


86 


76 






68 














85 


62 


72 






52 
















27 


29 


37 






31 


















132 








55 




128 










ie 


129 


121 


90 


41 




39 


55 















* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, d'^ath, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as show by school in TABLE XXIII. 



106 



Eighty -Third Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



TABLE 45 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science in the Maryland 
County High Schools, for Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Year and 
County 



Science 



1947- 48 . 

1948- 49 . 



1,353 
1,543 



1,864 
1,911 



1,409 
1,544 



664 
1.265 



243 
89 



639 
549 



298 
156 



241 
279 



21 



181 

33 



BY COUNTY. 1948-49 



Allegany 


23 


19 


20 


16 








16 








Anne Arundel 


173 


239 


80 


176 






124 










Baltimore 


230 


252 


73 


113 




18 






166 






Calvert 


92 


80 




52 


18 




44 


33 








Caroline 


75 


62 


53 






39 




16 


28 






Carroll 


35 


29 


22 


12 








14 








Cecil 


44 


43 


43 


24 
















Charles 


68 


104 


94 


88 




32 


23 










Dorchester 




110 


118 


46 








9 








Frederick 


44 


63 


53 


23 








9 








Garrett 


























loi 


86 


77 


37 


33 




57 










Howard 


56 


66 


63 


40 










22 






Kent 


69 


68 


46 


41 
















Montgomery 






101 


121 






15 


32 








Prince George's 


143 


114 


211 


156 






129 










Queen Anne's 


64 


54 


36 


35 








27 








St. Mary's 


52 


57 


71 


27 


27 








21 






Somerset 


86 


121 


86 


76 










25 






Talbot 


85 


62 


72 


49 






52 










Washington 


27 


29 


22 


15 






31 










Wicomico 




132 


113 


79 






33 










Worcester 


76 


121 


90 


39 






41 




17 







* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Cor.^ as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 
t If giv^n in other than 7th and/or 8th grades. 



108 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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109 



TABLE 47 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics and 
Business Education in the Maryland County High Schools, for the Year Ending 

June 30, 1949 



Year and 

County 



1947- 48 . 

1948- 49. 



Mathematics 



1,612 
1,819 



1,962 
2,229 



s 



,222 



195 
123 



921 
•001 



319 
311 



344 
329 



356 
176 



BY COUNTY, 1948-49 



Allegany 


23 


19 






20 








11 






Anno Arundel 


170 


234 






272 


28 




19 


82 


60 


82 




230 


252 


151 


9 


66 


92 










84 


Calvert 


93 


83 




21 




8 












Caroline 


74 


62 


54 




27 










50 




Carroll 


35 


29 


22 






10 




4 




12 




Cecil 


44 


44 


43 














47 




Charles 


51 


76 


94 




88 






72 






37 


Dorchester 




110 


118 




24 








21 






Frederick 


44 


63 


53 




18 














Garrett 
























Harford 


101 


86 


87 


33 








31 


26 






Howard 


56 


66 


63 




25 






32 








Kent 


69 


68 


46 














71 




Montgomery 




164 


24 




139 


19 




16 




42 


41 


Prince George's 


344 


344 


221 




95 


77 






2i 


36 




Queen Anne's 


70 


54 


36 














62 




St. Mary's 


52 


49 


81 






25 




48 






io 


Somerset 


122 


121 


86 


28 


16 






52 






38 


Talbot 


85 


62 


72 




49 


52 












Washington 


27 


29 






53 








i5 






Wicomico 




132 


48 




109 












94 


Worcester 


129 


82 


97 


32 








55 









* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking shorthand, typing, bookkeeping, and business training. 



110 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 48 — White Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages in the Maryland 
County High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1940 to 1949 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1940 


2,115 


3,328 


1,468 


2,594 


33 


48 


1941 


1,965 


3,325 


1,409 


2,457 


58 


59 


1942 


1,856 


3,032 


1,168 


2,197 


163 


194 


1943 


1,755 


2,845 


875 


1,852 


296 


460 


1944 


1,767 


2,927 


719 


1,652 


384 


736 




1,825 


2,986 


877 


1,645 


452 


762 


1946t 


1.721 


2,629 


915 


1,738 


446 


743 


1947t 


1,412 


2,227 


903 


1,652 


526 


712 


1948t 


1,282 


2,042 


832 


1,541 


455 


623 


1949t 


1,364 


2,086 


786 


1,295 


559 


745 



TABLE 49 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages in the Maryland 
County High Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Year and 
County 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1947- 48t 

1948- 49t 


23 
16 


29 
18 


22 
45 


59 
103 


1 
4 


20 
36 


BY COUNTY, 1948-49 


Anne Arundel 
Baltimore .... 
Montgomery . . 
Washington. . . 
Wicomico .... 


8 
8 


9 
9 


5 
9 
18 
13 


35 
11 
41 
16 


4 


36 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Figures include duplicates, if there are any. 

For 1949 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



111 



TABLE 50 — White Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics in Maryland County High Schools for Years 1940 to 1949 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


1940 


9,415 


892 


2,344 ■ 


8,903 


2,920 


1941 


10,196 


992 


2,355 


9,389 


3,287 


1942 


10,522 


1,100 


2,291 


9,850 


3,603 


1943 


10,731 


1,244 


2,192 


9,674 


3,518 


1944 


8,904 


1,083 


2,014 


9,776 


2,888 


1945 


8,813 


1,072 


1,511 


9,689 


2,841 


1946t 


12,964 


1,134 


1,779 


14,093 


2,664 


1947t 


14,090 


1,227 


2,110 


14,833 


2,261 


1948t 


15,414 


1,119 


2,629 


16,165 


1,596 


1949t 


17,744 


982 


2,822 


16,707 


2,300 



I 



TABLE 51 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics in Maryland County High Schools for Year Ending June 30,1949 



Year and 
County 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


1948t 


1,533 


221 


1,084 


2,277 


1,068 


1949t 


1,599 


282 


1,247 


2,533 


1,275 






BY COUNTY, 


1948-49 






Allegany 


18 


24 




20 


21 


Anne Arundel . . . 


56 


92 


ii 


183 


156 




298 




27 


347 




Calvert 






71 


49 


99 




• si 




97 


59 


48 


Carroll 


34 




34 


44 




Cecil 


55 




41 


85 




Charles 






162 


78 


126 


Dorchester 




79 


104 


136 


51 


Frederick 


71 


15 


47 


63 


31 


Garrett 












Harford 


156 






144 


29 


Howard 






91 


31 


76 


Kent 






112 


105 


37 


Montgomery ... 


156 


44 


45 


200 


61 


Prince George's. . 


194 




134 


274 


182 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


96 






61 


55 


St. Mary's 






83 


23 


109 


Somerset 


141 






223 


25 


Talbot 


44 


28 


64 


71 


83 


Washington 


62 






62 




Wicomico 


140 




30 


232 




Worcester 


27 




64 


43 


86 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Figures include duplicates, if any, and enrollment in junior high school classes (7, 8, 7-8) in addition 
to last four years as previously reported. 

For 1949 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



112 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 52 — White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education in 
Maryland County High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1940 to 1949 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical 


Education 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1940 


7,978 


10,585 


1,836 


2,254 


8,216 


8,168 


1941 


8,635 


11,524 


2,105 


2.472 


9,226 


9,322 


1942 


8,652 


12,064 


2,536 


3,072 


10,534 


11,016 


1943 


8,011 


11,335 


1,919 


2,407 


12,063 


13,277 


1944 


7,743 


11,362 


1,888 


2,298 


12,501 


14,695 


1945 


7,654 


11,217 


1,782 


2,199 


12,507 


14,457 


1946t 


15,304 


18,981 


7,104 


7,564 


20,211 


21,212 


1947t 


16,777 


20,114 


8,745 


8,623 


22.517 


22,585 


1948t 


19,624 


22,866 


10,058 


10,058 


24,631 


24,414 


1949t 


21,929 


24,141 


10,471 


10,435 


27,211 


26,769 



TABLE 53— Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education in 
Maryland County High Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1948t 


3,017 
3,322 


3,584 
3,844 


823 
1,217 


777 
1,054 


3,154 
3,717 


3,503 
4,354 


1949t 





BY COUNTY, 1948-49 



Allegany 


56 


52 






12 


11 


Anne Arundel . 


436 


445 


186 


29 


309 


397 


Baltimore .... 


394 


503 


251 


285 


373 


475 


Calvert 






39 


54 


125 


196 


Caroline 


139 


139 


42 


32 


138 


139 


Carroll 


55 


57 


22 


13 


55 


57 


Cecil 


85 


87 






96 


87 


Charles 


161 


233 


23 


14 


128 


163 


Dorchester . . . 


119 


147 






193 


189 


Frederick 


144 


142 


19 


25 


118 


119 


Garrett 












196 


Harford 


118 


105 


116 


69 


195 


Howard 


108 


129 


23 


33 


116 


138 


Kent 


112 


142 






112 


142 


Montgomery . . 


164 


199 


147 


147 


269 


301 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 


500 


571 


185 


194 


566 


648 










97 


120 


St. Mary's .... 


49 


75 


16 


i3 




248 


Somerset 


259 


286 






225 


Talbot 










149 


175 


Washington. . . 


62 


62 


27 


29 


62 


62 


Wicomico .... 


145 


211 






163 


232 


Worcester .... 


216 


259 


121 


117 


216 


259 



* Excluding duplicates and withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment, 
t Includes duplicates, if any, and enrollment from junior high school classes (7, 8, 7-8) in addition to 
last four years as previously reported. 

For 1949 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



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Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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115 



TABLE 56 



White and Colored Enrollment in Driver Education and Training: Maryland County 
High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1949 





Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 




Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 


County 


Boys 


Girls 


County 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE SCHOOLS 



Total 

Allegany. . . . 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Dorchester. . . 
Garrett 



1,087 


1,517 


Harford 


Howard 


92 


182 


Montgomery 


119 


76 


Prince George's 

St. Mary's 


103 


94 


22 


24 


Talbot 


28 


51 


Washington 


6 


19 




28 


48 


Worcester 



142 
75 
100 
179 
21 
46 
49 
10 
67 



COLORED SCHOOLS 



Total 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 



147 



26 



Howard 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Talbot 



21 



116 



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125 



TABLE 67— County Teachers in Service October, 1948, Who Attended Summer 

School, Summer 1948 



County 


Teachers in Service Oct. 1948 Who 
Attended Summer School in 1948 


Summer School Attended 


Number of 
Teachers 


Total 
Num- 
ber 


Number 


Per Cent 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 



WHITE COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total White . . 


1,259 


599 


660 


19 


1 


24 


5 




59 


16 


43 


6 


1 


16 


5 


Anne Arundel-. . 


69 


30 


39 


14 





22 


3 


Baltimore 


243 


154 


89 


28 


7 


24 


1 


Calvert 


3 


1 


2 


4 





9 


5 


Caroline 


7 


3 


4 


7 


1 


7 


7 


Carroll 


29 


13 


16 


11 


4 


13 


1 


Cecil 


39 


18 


21 


21 


7 


23 


3 


Charles 


27 


13 


14 


29 


5 


29 


8 


Dorchester .... 


22 


10 


12 


15 


6 


20 





Frederick 


41 


10 


31 


7 


2 


21 


8 


Garrett 


50 


25 


25 


22 


9 


39 


7 


Harford 


49 


20 


29 


16 


4 


25 


7 


Howard 


27 


13 


14 


22 


4 


23 


7 


Kent 


8 


4 


4 


12 


1 


11 


8 


Montgomery. . . 


231 


113 


118 


28 


8 


37 


8 


Prince George's 


128 


63 


65 


17 





21 


6 


Queen Anne's . . 


8 


1 


7 


2 


7 


20 


6 


St. Mary's 


12 


9 


3 


20 


9 


10 


7 


Somerset 


15 


4 


11 


10 


3 


26 


2 


Talbot 


15 


8 


7 


20 


5 


16 




Washington . . . 


146 


59 


87 


23 


8 


38 


5 


Wicomico 


20 


8 


12 


9 


7 


22 


2 


Worcester 


11 


4 


7 


8 


5 


14 






Total 

University of Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University 

Columbia University 

George Washington University . . 

Western Maryland College 

Shepherd State Teachers College 
Pennsylvania State College . . .y . 

University of Delaware 

University of West Virginia .... 

New York University 

Catholic University 

Fairmont Teachers College 

Duke University 

University of Wisconsin 

Radford College (V.P.I.) 

Wilson Teachers College 

University of Pennsylvania 

California Teachers College (Pa.) 

University of Pittsburgh 

Temple University 

University of Maine 

90 Others 



599 


660 


218 


260 


116 


39 


53 


70 


38 


27 


22 


28 


23 


16 


7 


22 


14 


13 


10 


15 


6 


7 


2 


10 


8 


3 
8 


3 
1 


8 


7 




6 


2 


1 


7 


3 


4 


2 


5 


2 


5 


1 


6 


56 


104 



COLORED COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total Colored . . 


367 


235 


132 


36.6 


35 





Allegany 











0.0 








Anne Arundel . . 


45 


27 


18 


32.5 


50 







32 


20 


12 


30.3 


35 


3 


Calvert 


5 


4 


1 


14.3 


7 


1 


Caroline 


7 


6 


1 


40.0 


11 


1 


Carroll 


2 





2 


0.0 


28 


6 


Cecil 


2 


1 


1 


12.5 


10 





Charles 


23 


17 


6 


40.5 


28 


6 


Dorchester .... 


23 


17 


6 


54.8 


37 


5 


Frederick 


16 


12 


4 


70.6 


36 


4 


Garrett 














Harford 


19 


11 


8 


55.0 


53 


3 


Howard 


12 


8 


4 


50.0 


40 





Kent 


17 


9 


8 


64.3 


72 


7 


Montgomery. . . 


24 


14 


10 


33 3 


38 


5 


Prince George's 


53 


40 


13 


38.5 


26 





Queen Anne's . . 


10 


8 


2 


50.0 


20 





St. Mary's 


9 


7 


2 


31 .8 


18 


2 


Somerset 


18 


10 


8 


40.0 


40 





Talbot 


13 


8 


5 


36.4 


31 


3 


Washington . . . 


5 


2 


3 


40.0 


37 


5 


Wicomico 


15 


7 


8 


22.6 


44 


4 


Worcester 


17 


7 


10 


30.4 


55 


5 



Total 

Morgan State College 

Hampton Institute 

New York University 

Temple University 

Howard University 

Columbia University 

University of Pennsylvania 

Catholic University 

University of Maryland*. . 

Virginia State College 

Pennsylvania State College 

Storer College 

Bluefield State College 

Boston University 

19 Others 



235 


132 


93 
31 


6 
11 


15 


16 


13 


18 


15 


13 


7 


17 


7 


14 


11 


6 


12 


4 


6 


5 





10 


3 


2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


19 


6 



* Classes conducted by the University of Maryland at Bowie State Teachers College. 



126 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 68 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1946-47, 1947-48, 1948-49 



Number of Certificates Issxjed 



Grade of Certificate 


1946-47 


1947-48 


1948-49 


Total Number of Certificates Issued 


1,327 


1,459 


1,685 


Administration and Supervision 








Administration and Supervision 


7 


4 


2 


High School Supervision 




11 


9 






8 


7 


Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 




3 


2 


Supervisor of Pupil Personnel II 




2 


2 




i 


7 


4 


Supervision of Special Subjects (Elem. School) . 












7 


g 




3 






Helping Teacher 


1 






County Librarian 


3 


8 


8 


High School 








Principal 


13 


18 


20 


Academic 


210 


269 


257 


Special 


112 


189 


196 


Vocational 


28 


40 


36 


Junior High School 




4 


22 


Nonpublic 


43 


54 


85 


Elementary 






19 


Principal 


8 


17 


Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 


293 


295 


363 


Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 


5 


7 


6 


Advanced First Grade 


6 


21 


38 


First Grade 




1 




Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 


i 


14 


37 


Nonpublic Advanced First Grade 








Nonpublic First Grade 








War Emergency Certificates 








Degree 










202 


162 


167 




107 


101 


174 


Non-Degree 






18 


High School Teaching 


31 


14 




162 


137 


161 


Provisional Certificates 


6 


11 


18 


Substitute Teachers' Certificates 






3 




9 


11 


Non-Degree 


67 


44 


23 



Maryland State Department of Education 



127 



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I) .2 



Maryland State Department of Education 133 
TABLE 75 

Number and Per Cent of Teachers New to Maryland County Schools 



Year 



New to Counties 








Change 






in 






Number 






of 






Teach- 


Number 


Per Cent 


ing Posi- 






tions 






October 






to 






October 



Number New to County Who Were 



In- 
experi- 
enced 



Sub- 
stitutes 



Experienced 





In 




From 




But 


Counties 


From 


Other 




New 


But Not 


An- 


Type 


Othert 


to 


Teaching 


other 


School 




State 


Preced- 


County* 


in Same 






ing Year 


County* 





WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1939-40 


199 


7 


4 


-17 


106 


26 


18 


49 


18 


4 




1940-41 


205 


7 


6 


-5 


127 


20 


29 


29 


19 


10 




1941-42 


355 


13 


4 


-38 


142 


67 


63 


83 


31 


4 




1942-43 


565 


21 


3 


+ 8 


272 




169 


124 


54 


5 




1943-44 


521 


19 


4 


+ 42 


165 


10 


215 


131 


49 


5 


47 


1944-45 


553 


20 


1 


+ 67 


176 


88 


190 


99 


46 


10 


29 


1945-46 


621 


22 


7 


-52 


159 


85 


219 


157 


°50 


12 


47 


1946-47 


712 


25 


3 


+79 


145 


106 


279 


181 


°57 


15 


41 


1947-48 


586 


19 


6 


+ 181 


127 


57 


244 


154 


x59 


20 


32 


1948-49 


646 


20 


5 


+ 148 


151 


26 


309 


157 


J59 


26 


21 



WHITE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1939-40 


242 


13.9 


+72 


156 


31 


38 


17 


19 


13 




1940-41 


262 


14.7 


+45 


173 


12 


44 


33 


20 


7 




1941-42 


421 


22.6 


+73 


233 


26 


111 


51 


25 


30 




1942-43 


587 


32.2 


-19 


270 




237 


80 


61 


21 




1943-44 


517 


28.7 


-55 


196 


6 


241 


74 


58 


27 


10 


1944-45 


525 


29.0 


+ 14 


178 


71 


210 


66 


46 


24 


15 


1945-46 


779 


37.0 


+286 


240 


51 


302 


186 


50 


116 


22 


1946-47 


763 


33.4 


+ 193 


298 


53 


278 


131 


t57 


53 


28 


1947-48 


675 


26.7 


+239 


259 


22 


280 


112 


1/38 


43 


15 


1948-49 


605 


22.4 


+ 168 


281 


25 


239 


58 


i/57 


22 


14 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1939-40 


57 


8 


9 


-17 


42 


1 


3 


11 


22 






1940-41 


41 


6 


5 


-14 


30 


2 


2 


7 


7 






1941-42 


59 


9 


8 


-24 


37 


8 


5 


9 


5 


i 




1942-43 


87 


14 


7 


-9 


65 




9 


13 


9 






1943-44 


120 


20 


3 


-6 


81 


6 


18 


15 


9 




5 


1944-45 


132 


22 


3 


+ 14 


84 


17 


16 


15 


21 




3 


1945-46 


108 


18 


2 


-10 


48 


13 


20 


27 


18 


i 


4 


1946-47 


104 


17 





+ 18 


45 


8 


19 


32 


6 


5 


1 


1947-48 


71 


11 


7 


-5 


50 


3 


8 


10 


6 


3 


6 


1948-49 


97 


15 


1 


+35 


53 


4 


12 


27 


°9 


3 


3 



COLORED HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1939-40 


35 


20.8 


+20 


29 


2 


3 


1 


10 


4 




1940-41 


42 


24 1 


+ 12 


32 


2 


7 


1 


6 






1941-42 


38 


19.9 


+ 11 


27 




7 


4 


3 


4 




1942-43 


65 


32.8 


+ 5 


49 




10 


6 


11 


2 




1943-44 


79 


37.4 


+ 15 


52 


5 


19 


3 


4 


1 




1944-45 


90 


43.1 


+7 


49 


9 


28 


4 


11 






1945-46 


96 


37.0 


+43 


59 


7 


15 


14 


°12 


li 




1946-47 


104 


35.3 


+35 


64 


1 


23 


16 


3 


10 


1 


1947-48 


110 


32.3 


+ 46 


65 


2 


29 


14 


4 


10 




1948-49 


98 


26.0 


+36 


56 


2 


26 


14 




4 





* Excluded from total number and per cent new to counties. 

t Withdrawals during year who returned during the same year excluded from total number and per 
cent. 

° One transfer from Baltimore City is included in the total number and per cent. 
t Three transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 
X Four transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 
y Two transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 



134 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 76 



Number and Per Cent of White Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of 
Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year, 1948-49 





New to 


County 






Number New 


TO 


County Who 


Were 
















Change 










Experienced 




















in 

Number 












u 












'^^ 


County 








of 

Teaching 








s 




iotn( 


u 


choo 






Yea 






Number 


Per Cent 


Positions 
October 
to 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


1 

iz, Si 


Couni 


ut No 
eachir 
iding ' 


<t 

o o 


o 

S 
o 


w s >> 
J c 


thdra 


g fc. 










October 








c 




So 
P^ 


fa 




Ho 








































and Average .... 


t646 


t20 


5 


+ 148 


151 


26 


309 




157 


J59 






26 






21 


Allegany 


30 


11 


4 


- 5 


5 


5 


5 




13 


2 












3 


Anne Arundel . . . 


66 


30 


8 


+ 18 


19 


3 


226 




12 


x6 






4 








Baltimore 


165 


30 


7 


+27 


57 


11 


48 




39 


x^lO 






3 






2 


Calvert 


3 


12 





+ 1 






3 












1 








Caroline 


5 


11 


9 









4 




















Carroll 


26 


22 


8 


+ 4 


12 


1 


6 




6 


1 






3 








Cecil 


13 


15 


7 


+ 3 


1 


1 


6 




3 


2 






1 










16 


36 


4 


+ 1 






11 




4 


1 






1 








Dorchester 


4 


6 


3 


+ 1 


2 




1 




1 














i 


Frederick 


16 


11 


6 





2 


1 


3 




8 


2 






2 








Garrett 


18 


16 


5 


+ 4 


4 


2 


5 




5 


2 












2 


Harford 


20 


16 


4 


+ 6 


9 




9 




1 


1 






2 








Howard 


7 


12 


1 


+ 3 






4 




1 


2 






2 








Kent 


5 


15 


1 





1 




2 




1 
















Montgomery .... 


114 


29 


1 


+28 


13 




77 




15 


9 






2 






5 


Prince George's. . 


110 


29 


6 


+27 


14 




70 




16 


xlO 






1 






6 


Queen Anne's . . . 


5 


13 


5 













5 
















St. Mary's 


8 


18 


6 


+ 7 


1 




3 




3 


1 






2 








Somerset 


6 


15 


4 


+ 1 


1 




1 




2 


2 














Talbot 


4 


10 


3 









1 




2 


1 














Washington 


44 


17 


7 


+ 18 


6 


1 


220 




15 


2 






1 






2 


Wicomico 


10 


12 


2 


+ 3 


3 


1 


2 




2 


2 














Worcester 


7 


14 


9 


+ 1 


1 




2 




2 


2 






1 









Note: Data for Baltimore City were not available. 
* Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Excludes transfers within and between counties, and withdrawals during the year, but includes transfers from 
Baltimore City. 

X Transfers between counties are excluded from grand total, but the three transfers from Baltimore City are in- 
cluded. 

X Includes one transfer from Baltimore City. 

y Includes one who transferred from the Frostburg State Teachers College elementary school, 
z Includes one transfer from private school. 




Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



TABLE 77 

Number and Per Cent of White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School 
Teachers New to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the 

School Year 1948-49 



County 



Total Counties 
and Average 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore .... 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll. . . . 

Cecil .... 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick . . . 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset . . 

Talbot 

Washington . . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester . . 



New to County 



Number 



t605 

37 
37 
97 

8 
12 
37 
23 
12 
13 
39 
15 
35 
21 

4 
79 
90 

3 
13 

6 
14 



18 



Per Cent 



t22.4 

14.2 
21.1 
26.2 
38.1 



23 
30 
25 
25 
21 
27 

23.8 
31.0 
35.6 
11.8 
25.3 
29.9 
8.8 
46.4 
14,3 
33 3 
16.8 
16.7 
36.0 



Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 



+ 168 

+ 16 
+ 9 
+ 57 
+ 1 



+ 6 
+ 2 
+ 5 
+ 1 
+ 18 
+ 14 


+ 1 
+ 4 
+ 2 
+ 14 
- 1 
+ 1 



In- 
experi- 
enced 



281 

10 
9 
43 
3 
7 
24 
12 
4 
6 
22 
10 
19 
15 
2 
24 
35 
1 
5 
2 
7 
14 
2 
5 



Number New to County Who Were 



Sub- 
stitutes 



Experienced 



o 



239 

20 
23 
24 
4 
4 
5 

29 

6 
3 
8 
1 
9 
4 
1 
38 
40 

5 
3 
7 
18 

2 

5 



J- u. 



58 



o o 



o _ o 



t57 

2 
x3 
xl3 
1 
1 
2 



22 



f- I, 



-o.S „.S 



Note: Data for Baltimore City were not available. 

+ ^ i"^ totaXs in columns one and two 

from BaWmo^rc5it'' '"^ -'^^drawals during the year, but includes transfers 

included"'^''' "^'^"^"^ ^""""^ *«t^l' but the two transfers from Baltimore City are 

X Includes one transfer from Baltimore City. 

^ TnSf one who transferred from supervisory position to teaching position 

z Includes one transfer from private school. p^siliuh. 



136 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 78 



Number and Per Cent of Colored Teachers -New to the Schools of Each Individual 
County of Maryland During the School Year 1948-49 





New to County 






Number 


New 


to County Who Were 












Change 
in 






Experienced 


County 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


But New to 
State 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


From Another 
County 


From Other 
Type School 
in Same 
County* 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Returned 
During Year* 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



Total Counties and 




























t97 


tl5 


1 


+35 


53 


4 


12 


27 




3 


3 


Allegany . 


1 


20 







1 






1 










Anne Arundel . . . 


9 


10 


8 


+ 


1 


2 




2 


3 


t2 






Baltimore 


17 


25 


7 


+ 


13 


10 






1 


3 






Calvert 


9 


32 


1 







4 




3 


2 








Caroline 


1 


6 


7 







1 














Carroll 





























Cecil 


3 


37 


5 











1 


i 








Charles 


13 


30 


9 


+ 


4 






1 


5 








Dorchester 


4 


12 


9 


+ 


2 






1 










Frederick 


2 


11 


8 













1 








Garrett 


























Harford 







6 





















Howard 





























Kent 


2 


14 


3 





















Montgomery .... 


3 


7 


1 













2 








Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


21 


20 


2 


+ 10 


12 




2 


6 








2 


12 


5 













1 








St. Mary's 


1 


4 


5 


+ 


1 
















Somerset 


2 


8 
























Talbot 


1 


4 


5 


+ 


1 
















Washington 


1 


20 





+ 


1 








1 








Wicomico 


5 


16 


1 


+ 


1 


'2 






2 


1 






Worcester 


8 


34 


8 







4 


1 




2 


1 




i 



COLORED HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



Total Counties and 






















Average 


t98 


t26.0 


+ 36 


56 


2 


26 


14 


5 


4 


1 


Allegany 


1 


16.7 









1 










Anne Arundel . . . 


4 


11.1 


+ 3 


1 




2 


1 




2 




Baltimore 


12 


35.3 


+ 4 


5 




3 




2 






Calvert 


10 


71.4 


+ 6 


6 




3 


1 








Caroline 


8 


88.9 





6 




1 


1 








Carroll 


3 


42.9 





2 




1 










Cecil 


2 


20.0 


+ 1 


2 














Charles 


3 


14.3 


+ 1 


3 














Dorchester 


3 


18.7 


+ 1 






2 


i 








Frederick 


2 


18.2 





1 




1 










Garrett 






















Harford 


2 


13^3 





1 






1 








Howard 


4 


40.0 


+ 1 


4 














Kent 


2 


18.2 





1 






1 








Montgomery .... 


7 


26.9 


+ 2 


2 




2 


2 


1 






Prince George's . . 


16 


32.0 


+ 9 


8 




6 


1 


1 






Queen Anne's . . . 




0.0 



















St. Mary's 


i 


9.1 


+ 2 








1 








Somerset 


7 


35.0 


+ 1 


6 








i 






Talbot 


6 


37.5 


+ 1 


1 




2 


3 








Washington 


3 


37.5 


+ 2 


2 




1 










Wicomico 


1 


5.5 





1 










i 




Worcester 


6 


33.3 


+ 2 


4 




i 


1 







Note: Data for Baltimore City were not available. 
* Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Excludes transfers within and between counties, and withdrawals during the year, but includes transfers from 
Baltimore City. 

t Includes one transfer from Baltimore City. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



TABLE 79 

Source of White Teachers New to the Counties of Maryland: 1948-1949 





Total 


Experienced 


Inexperienced 


County 


Total* 


Recruited from 


Recruited from 


Recruited from 




Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


All r^minfioe? 


1 ■ 

1,256 

58 
99 
210 
11 
17 
55 


533 


t CO 

30 
oy 

qr 


331 


— 






Allptyanv 


548 


202 


175 


Annp Amnrlol 
-i^nnic T\l Illicit;! 


28 
40 
115 


20 


25 


8 


5 


Bfiitirnorf? 


23 


49 


17 


10 


Calvert 


69 


72 


46 


23 


CarolinG 


2 


9 
14 
24 
24 
20 


1 


7 


1 


2 


Carroll 


3 
31 


2 


8 




6 


Cecil 


35 


13 


11 


18 


13 
9 


Charles 


27 
16 
48 
30 
53 
27 
9 


11 


7 


15 


4 


Dorchester 


7 
12 
30 


7 


17 




3 


Frederick 


4 1 
18 
16 

35 i 
15 
5 

128 
137 


5 


4 


7 




Garrett 


16 


11 


14 


1 


Harford. . . 


14 
18 
12 


10 


6 


4 


10 


Howard 


9 


18 


9 


17 


Kent .... 


5 


8 


7 


7 


Montgomery. . 


189 
194 
7 


4 
61 

57 
7 
12 


3 


3 




2 


Prince George's 


38 


115 


23 


13 


Queen Anne's. 


41 


110 


16 


27 


St. Mary's. 


21 




6 




1 




Somerset . 


12 
18 
79 
18 

23 


9 


7 


8 


5 




Talbot . . 


7 


5 
15 
47 


5 


4 


2 


1 


Washington 


3 
32 
13 
14 


3 
22 


8 




7 


Wicomico . 


38 


10 


9 


Worcester 


5 


9 
10 


4 


4 


1 




9 


7 


4 


2 



TABLE 80 

Source of Colored Teachers New to the Counties of Maryland: 1948-1949 



County 



All Counti 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore. . . 

Calvert 

Caroline. 
Carroll . . 
Cecil ... 
Charles 
Dorchester. 
Frederick. 

Garrett ' 

Harford 

Howard. . 

Kent : ; : 

Montgomery . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total* 



Total 



Recruited from 



Mary- 
land 



201 


114 


87 


2 




2 


13 


8 


5 


24 


16 


8 


19 


9 


10 


8 


5 


3 


3 


2 


1 


5 


1 


4 


16 


10 


6 


7 


3 


4 


4 


3 


1 


2 


2 




4 




4 


4 


2 


2 


10 


6 


4 


37 


16 


21 


2 


2 


2 


2 




9 


7 


2 


7 


3 


4 


4 


2 


2 


6 


6 




13 


9 


4 



Other 
States 



Experienced 



Inexperienced 



Recruited from 



Mary- 
land 



55. 



Other 
States 



Note: 



'^^l^'^^'TT''^'^?'^^ ^« on the teacher's 

|ho, fa^-tor determming the "source" of teachers. 



ipplicat 



Recruited 



Mary- 
land 



59 



Other 
States 



49 



on blank has been used 



e and 14 



138 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 81 



Supervisory* and Pupil Personnel Services Provided by the Counties and Baltimore 
City in Maryland Public Schools; Number of Principals and Teachers, Year Ending 

June 30, 1949 













General Supervisors by Type of 
School 








Principals 


Total 












Other 


Pupil 


County 


and 




Super- 


J^iiementary 






Super- 


Personnel 




Teachers 


visors 








High 


visorst 














White 


Colored 










Total State 


10,933 


5 


184 


5 


52 


6 


18 9 


28 


9 


84.1 


85.4 


Baltimore City 


4,067 


4 


66 




8 





4.0 


2 





52.1 


43.0 


Total Counties 


6,866 


1 


118 


4 


44 


6 


14.9 


26 


9 


32.0 


42.4 


Allegany 


530 


4 


8 


8 


3 





t 


1 


5 


4.3 


3 3 


Anne Arundel .... 


511 


9 


7 


5 


4 





1.0 


1 





1.5 


3.0 


Baltimore 


1,009 

88 


8 


14 





4 


5 


1.0 


2 





6.5 


5.0 


Calvert 


6 


1 


7 





7 


1.0 








1.0 


Caroline 


120 





2 


4 







0.4 


1 


6 




1.0 


Carroll 


248 


6 


4 


5 


2 





0.2 


1 





13 


2.0 


Cecil 


191 


2 


3 


2 


2 





t 


1 





0.2 


1.0 


Charles 


154 


9 


2 


5 


1 





0.6 





9 




1.0 


Dorchester 


170 


5 


3 










1.0 


1 







1.0 


Frederick 


306 


8 


5 


3 


1 


6 


0.5 


1 


5 


1^7 


1.0 


Garrett 


170 


3 


3 





2 







1 







1.0 


Harford 


269 


6 


5 


2 


2 





0^7 


2 


5 




1.6 


Howard 


142 





2 


8 


1 





0.8 


1 







1.0 


Kent 


90 


5 


2 


5 


1 





0.5 


1 







10 


Montgomery 


772 





14 





5 





1.0 


2 





6^6 


4.0 


Prince George's. . . 


832 





14 


2 


3 


8 


2.0 


1 


8 


6.6 


5.0 


Queen Anne's 


97 





2 


5 


1 





0.5 









0.5 


St. Mary's 


105 


4 


2 


9 


1 





0,9 


1 







1.0 


Somerset 


125 


4 


2 


5 


1 





0.3 


1 


2 




1.0 


Talbot 


118 


5 


2 


5 


1 





0.5 


1 







1.0 


Washington 


485 


8 


8 


4 


3 





X 


1 


5 


3^9 


3.0 


Wicomico 


184 


7 


. 3 





1 





1.0 


1 







2 


Worcester 


140 


2 


2 





1 





1.0 








1.0 



* Excludes supervisors of Maintenance, Transportation, and Buildings. 

t Includes supervisors of Art, Audio-Visual Education, English, Guidance, Handwriting, Health and 
Physical Education, History, Home Economics, Instruction, Libraries, Mathematics, Music, School Lunch, 
and Special Education. 

t Less than 0.1 of one supervisor's load. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



139 



TABLE 82 



-Number of Clerks Employed in Maryland County Schools; Salaries 
Paid, 1948-1949 



County 



Total Counties . 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . 

Calvert 

Caroline . . . 
Carroll .... 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . 
Frederick. . . . 
Garrett 



Number 
of Clerks 



Salaries 
Paid 



193 


$231,049.60 


9 


13,623.98 


19 


24,788.96 


25 


41,288.02 


3 


2,787.50 


6 


1,664.41 


6 


4.320.00 


' 2 


2,504.16 


1 


450.00 


12 


11,582.50 


2 


1,610.00 



County 



Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Number 
of Clerks 



Salaries 
Paid 



4 


$3,573.49 


5 


2,280.00 


1 


82.00 


37 


60,022.13 


36 


35,477.72 


2 


3,640.00 


1 


512.40 


13 


14,756.49 


5 


4,576.09 


4 


1,509.75 



TABLE 83-Repair or Utility Men and Janitors, Engineers, Firemen, etc., in 
Maryland Schools, Year Ending June 30, 1949 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore . 

Calvert 

Caroline. . . . 
Carroll ... 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Ho A'ard ... . 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington ... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Repair or Utility Men 



Total 



446 

234 

212 

1 
42 
5 
1 
2 
1 



Full- 
Time 



367 

234 

133 

1 
17 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 

2 
1 

2 
4 

2 
37 
40 



Part- 
Time 



79 



79 



Janitors, Cleaners, Firemen, etc. 



1 White 


Colored 


Total 


Full- 


Part- 




Full- 


Part- 


Time 


Time 


Total 


Time 


Time 


1,401 


827 


574 


404 


171 


233 


572 


297 


275 


227 


121 


106 


829 


530 


299 


177 


50 


127 


80 


64 


16 


2 


1 


1 


64 


27 


37 


36 


2 


34 


122 


65 


57 


24 


8 


16 


7 


4 


3 


1 


1 


13 


6 


7 


4 


4 


18 


16 


2 


1 

3 


1 




24 


11 


13 


2 




7 


7 




3 


3 




20 


17 


3 


4 


4 




41 


21 


20 


8 


1 


7 


48 


17 


31 






35 


18 


17 


10 


2 


8 


15 


9 


6 


10 


1 


9 


12 


6 


6 


6 


1 


5 


107 


99 


8 


23 


4 


19 


94 


70 


24 


18 


9 


9 


13 




6 


1 






3 


3 




3 




3 


10 


10 




4 


4 




9 
59 


9 




3 


1 


2 


29 


30 


2 


2 




16 


10 


6 


2 


1 


1 

8 


12 


5 


7 


9 


1 



140 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 84 — Average Number Belonging per Maryland Teacher and Principal for 

Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Average Number Belonging Per Teacher and Principal 



County 


White 


White Elementary Schools* 


Colored 


Schools 




High 




























Schools 


One- 


Two- 


Three- 






All Ele- 






Ele- 






teacher 


teacher 


teacher 


Graded 


mentary 


High 


mentary* 


State Average 


21.2 
















32 


9 


23 


8 


32.5 


Baltimore City 


20.2 
















30 


8 


24 


9 


30.8 


County Average 


21.6 


21 


5 


27 


4 


32.4 


34 


8 


34 





22 


7 


34.7 


Allegany 


24.1 


t22 


5 


28 


5 


32.6 


33 





32 


8 


17 




31.2 


Anne Arundel 


21.7 




25 


6 


34.8 


36 


8 


36 


5 


25 


5 


36.0 


Baltimore 


26.3 






t30 





t35.6 


36 


6 


36 


6 


25 


2 


40.2 


Calvert 


20.4 






tl6 


4 


t21.1 


31 


5 


29 


2 


23 


2 


34.8 


Caroline 


17.8 






28 


9 


36 


6 


35 


6 


21 


6 


36.4 


Carroll 


19.7 






24 


1 




34 


3 


34 


1 


16 


7 


38.2 


Cecil 


19.1 


29 


1 


28 


8 




34 


4 


33 


5 


18 


8 


36.2 


Charles 


18.6 












33 


8 


33 


8 


21 


6 


35.6 


Dorchester 


18.5 


18 





28 


1 




33 





28 


8 


23 


4 


32.7 


Frederick 


20.9 


29 


4 


29 


3 


36^8 


39 





38 


1 


21 


5 


36.2 


Garrett 


19.9 


19 


5 


32 


5 


29.6 


35 


6 


30 


8 








Harford 


19.3 


26 


3 


25 


7 


t33.4 


37 


4 


35 


8 


25 





32.7 


Howard 


17.2 


t25 


8 


t23 





33 


4 


32 


9 


24 


9 


34.2 


Kent 


17.9 


tl3 


4 


23 


7 


130 '.7 


32 





29 


1 


23 


2 


33.9 


Montgomery 


19.8 


t22 





27 


7 


31.9 


32 


7 


32 


6 


22 





36.1 


Prince George's 


22.8 


tl8 


3 


29 


6 


34.9 


35 


1 


34 


9 


22 


7 


30.9 




18.9 


17 


8 


26 


3 


28.9 


33 


5 


30 


7 


21 


5 


29.6 


St. Mary's 


20.8 


24 


9 


24 







38 


2 


24 


6 


21 


7 


29.6 


Somerset 


17.8 


25 





21 


9 




35 


6 


33 


4 


23 





37.8 


Talbot 


19.5 


tl8 


2 


22 


2 


t25'.0 


33 


6 


31 


7 


20 





33.2 




22.6 


21 


9 


29 


3 


32.4 


31 


4 


31 


1 


15 


9 


33.9 


Wicomico 


21.1 


82 


7 


29 


7 


32.8 


37 


5 


36 


7 


21 


6 


35.5 


Worcester 


18.0 






21 


9 


31.7 


33 


2 


31 


8 


24 


3 


36.2 



* Excludes pupils going to elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 
For basic data by county see TABLES VI and X. 
t One school only. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



141 



TABLE 85 

Average Number of Pupils Belonging per County Teacher and Principal: 1940-1949 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Average Number Belonging Per Teacher and PRiNcirAL 


White 


Colored 


Elementary* 


High 


Elementary* 


High 


1940 


35.5 
35.8 
36.0 
36.8 
36.5 
36.0 
35.2 
34.6 
33.9 
34.0 


24.5 
24.1 
23.3 
23.0 
22.9 
23.1 
23.5 
22.8 
21.6 
21.6 


35.3 
35.8 
36.3 
36.3 
36.1 
36,1 
35.7 
35.4 
35.6 
34.7 


27.5 
27.2 
25.5 
25.4 
24.7 
24.3 
25.5 
24.4 
23.1 
22.7 


1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 





* Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



TABLE 86 

Average Annual Salary per Maryland County Teacher and Principal: 1923-1949 



School Year 



1923 
1928 
1933 
1938 
1939 

1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 

1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 



White 



Elementary 



$990 
1,155 
1,231 
1,295 
1,314 

1,360 
1,387 
1,427 
1,539 
1,805 

1,862 
2,027 
2,306 
3,234 
3,236 



High 



$1,436 
1,544 
1,532 
1,587 
1,595 

1,605 
1,618 
1,639 
1,735 
1,997 

2,042 
2,183 
2,439 
3,446 
3,318 



Colored 



Elementary 



$513 
602 
657 
745 
846 

906 
993 
1,124 
1,291 
1,551 

1,599 
1,737 
2,002 
3,157 
2,916 



142 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



i i s iiiij. iiiii iiiii.p.iii. IP. 



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Ml 



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i I 5 -SSii -mr 

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i § i p.iii iiiii 



i^il 



E ip.ll 11111 



i ; i iiiii gjiji 



iisi ligii ill 



SiiTilsrw 



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1511 giisi isi 



ipg iiiii ill 



iMi. mm lit 



I I !■ Ills! !■!■!•!!• III!!- 1!! 
I i I IIIII ii| Jii it 

I I I iji.i IIIII i.i.i i.ji. i.i. 
I i s iiiii iiigi iii Iii ii 

liii. siii ii 



1 



il 



17 



Ml 



il 



i^il 



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ii 



§ S i. 



IIIII IIIII 
iiiii iijii 



l^il 



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17 



IIIII 

iii iiii 



IIIII illl III 

iiiii iiiii ii 



PJ.Si iiiii 



fii 
i g i iiii. mm 



3: 

Will 



SiSii. IIS 



i^ii 



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f 



1^ 



ii.p.i III 

iii iii ii 

iii.si iiiii iii 



ll|5.| IIIII 
iii iiiii iiiii iii. 



mi 



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=5111 mil 

ii:i iiiii 



il 



i^ii 



f 



"^o ^ 

s s 



IIIII IIIII 
iiiii iisii 



nil 

iiii 



IIIII III 
iiii ii 



ill 



IIIII mil 

iiii iiiii 



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iiif 



IIII III 
iiiii iii 



Mill" 



mil III 

iiriil 



I i I 
111 



ill 




II- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



TABLE 88— Number of Maryland County White and Colored Elementary Schools by 
County-Number of Teachers and Principals: Year Ending June 30 1919 





















































Number 






■v 




























'a; 
















OF 

Teachers 




>» 


c 

3 


0) 
u 




o 








u 












£ 


t- 
o 


c 


jn 






c 

q 


G 




AND 




c 

C3 


< 


o 

s 




_c 








m 

0) 












o 


C 


< 




1 




fee 






Principals 


H 
o 

Eh 


< 


0) 

c 
c 

< 


■« 
PQ 


> 

^ I 


"o 

c5 
O 


o 

ca 

U 


'o 

a; 
O 


U 


Dorch 


Froder 


I 
O 


Harfor 


& 
o 
X 


c 


c 

o 


o 
c 


c 

!L 
3 

0" 




u 

QJ 

E 

o 


o 

jC 

E- 


Washir 


W \r.,in 


Oi 

u 
o 



county elementary schools FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schools . 



1.0-1 
1.5-2 
2.5-3 
3.5-4 
4.5- 5 
5.5-6 
6.5-7 
7.5-8 
8.5-9 
9.5-10 
10.5-11 
11.5-12 
12 . 5-13 
13.5-14 
14.5-15 
15.5-16 
16.5-17. 
17.5-18. 



18.5-19.4. . 
19.5-20.4. . . 
20 . 5 or more 



|a500 

92 
76 
30 
48 
29 
38 
29 
23 
22 
18 
12 
15 
13 
11 
10 
5 
7 
2 
3 
1 
16 



35 



t2 



28 



46 26 

26 *6 
8 5 
1 
2 
3 

2 
2 



10 37 



45 13 14 



t*3 
t5t2l 8 



lOj 

31*2 
2 

1 
3 
1 

1 

2 



39 15 10 



2 *1 



2 
2 

6 2 
2 1 
2 



COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools . . 

1.0- 1.4. . 
1.5- 2.4. . . 
2.5- 3.4 
3.5- 4.4. . . 
4.5- 5.4. . . 
5.5- 6.4. 
6.5- 7.4. . . 
7.5- 8.4. . . 

10.5-11.4. . 
11.5-12.4. . 

12.5- 13.4. . . 

13.6- 14.4. . . 

17.5-18.4. . . 
20 .5 or more 



256 

87 
94 

35i 
15j 
7 



19 



11 



" '"cSuw"'"'' ^'^^'^ "'^^^ - elementary schools but offer a junior high school 

* Wln^"^ ^""u""} ^i.^^'^^ ^ two-teacher organization. 

Includes two schools having a two-teacher organization. 
T Includes one school having a grad-d organization. 



144 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 89 

Decease in Teachers Employed in County One-Teacher Schools* 1940-1949 



County Elementary School Teachers 



Year 
Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1940 


2,944 


209 


7.1 


644 


198 


30.7 


1941 


2,921 


184 


6.3 


627 


181 


28.9 


1942 


2,935 


160 


5.5 


611 


146 


24.0 


1943 


2,929 


143 


4.9 


601 


132 


22.0 


1944 


2,979 


118 


4.0 


602 


121 


20.2 


1945 


3,050 


106 


3.5 


611 


112 


18.3 


1946 


2,719 


88 


3.2 


597 


98 


16.4 


1947 


2,806 


83 


2.9 


608 


91 


15.0 


1948. 


2,979 


77 


2.6 


612 


84 


13.7 


1949 


3,170 


73 


2.3 


647 


82 


12.7 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



TABLE 90— -Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Pupils in One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools in Maryland Counties: Year Ending June 30, 1949 



County 


Schools for 


White Pupils 


Schools for Colored Pupils 


Teachers 
Teacher 


in One- 
Schools 


Pupils 
Teacher 


n One- 
Schools 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils 
Teacher 


n One- 
Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total and Average 


73 


2 


3 


1,567 


1 


5 


82 


12 


7 


2,349 


9 


6 


Allegany 


1 





4 


22 





3 


1 


20 





31 


19 


9 


Anne Arundel 














5 


6 


1 


136 


4 


6 


Baltimore 














2 


3 


1 


82 


3 




Calvert 














9 


32 


1 


318 


32 


6 


Caroline 


























Carroll 














"2 


27 


8 


51 


18 


5 


Cecil 


4 


4 


7 


116 


4 





1 


12 


5 


21 


7 


3 


Charles 














7 


15 


8 


255 


16 


2 


Dorchester 


14 


21 


9 


253 


13 


7 


6 


19 


4 


156 


15 


4 


Frederick 


2 


1 


4 


59 


1 


1 


3 


17 


6 


88 


14 


3 


Garrett 


26 


23 


9 


507 


15 


1 














Harford 


5 


4 


1 


132 


3 





4 


20 





loi 


15 


4 


Howard 


1 


1 


7 


26 


1 


4 


2 


12 


5 


61 


11 


2 


Kent 


1 


3 





13 


1 


3 


3 


21 


4 


98 


20 


6 


Montgomery. . . . 


1 





3 


22 





2 


4 


9 


3 


126 


8 


1 


I'rincp George's . . . 
QuoF-n Anne's 


1 





3 


18 





1 


7 


6 


7 


184 


5 


7 


3 


8 


1 


54 


4 


8 


10 


62 


5 


258 


54 


5 


St. Marv's 


4 


9 


3 


99 


9 


4 


8 


35 


2 


192 


28 


6 


Somerset 


3 




8 


75 


5 


8 














Talbot 


1 


2 


6 


18 


1 


5 


4 


18 


2 


101 


13 


8 


Washington 


4 


1 


6 


88 


1 


1 














Wicomico 


2 


2 


4 


65 


2 


2 


4 


12 


9 


90 


8 


2 


Worcester 



























* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



TABLE 91 — Number of Maryland County White Junior-Senior and Senior High 
Schools and White Junior High Schools by County — Number of Teachers: 
Year Ending June 30, 1949 





































Sc 




























































c 






Number 

OF 

Teiachers 


All Schools 


Allegany 


Anne Arun 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


"S 
U 

as 
O 


Harford 


Howard 


c 

4) 


1 

o 

c 

o 


Prince Geo 


c 
c 

< 

c 
c 
a 
3 

<y 


1 St. Mary's 


2 
£ 


c 


n 




0) 
ag 

O 


Grand Total . . 


156 


11 


8 


13 


1 


5 


9 


8 


6 


7 


8 


5 


8 


4 


4 


12 


15 




2 


5 


3 


10 


5 


4 



COUNTY JUNIOR-SENIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



Total 


120 

1 

2 
3 
6 
3 
9 
7 
1 
8 
2 
8 

3 
3 
9 

10 
2 
1 

35 


8 


4 


7 


1 


5 


8 


7 


2 


6 

1 
1 


6 


5 


8 


4 


4 


7 


10 


3 


2 


4 


3 


7 


5 


4 


2 


3 


























1 




















4 






















1 












1 
1 


i 




1 

3 




5 


















1 
1 


















6 










1 
1 
















1 
1 










7 


1 
1 








1 


3 


1 






1 




















1 


8 


1 








1 


2 






1 












9 








1 




























10 




1 








2 






1 


1 
1 


1 
1 










1 














11 


































12 






1 
1 
1 


1 

2 
1 






1 




2 




1 
1 






1 










1 


13 














1 




1 


1 




14 










1 


















15 






1 








1 
1 


























1 
1 


16 








1 


1 










1 


1 


'4 
1 


1 


i 


2 




1 
1 




17 
















1 


2 


18 


















1 




19 


1 

4 










































20 and over 


2 


6 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 






4 


5 








1 


4 


'1 











COUNTY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



*36 

1 

4 
5 
1 
2 

2 
2 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 

1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



*6 



* Excludes twenty-three seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but ofter a 
junior high school curriculum. 

For teaching staff in individual high schools, seo TABLE XXII. 



146 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 92 — Number of Maryland County White Junior-Senior and Senior High 
Schools and White Junior High Schools bv Countv — Average Number Belonging: 
Year Ending June 30, 1949 



































>. 

u 


rge's 


05 

"o; 








c 






Average 
Number 


loolg 


>> 


irun 


a 
o 












c 






-o 






0) 

6 

o 


Geo 


Ann 


ry's 


1 




be 


c 


a; 


Belonging 






c 


Itim 


c; 
_> 


rolir 


rroll 


'w 


arlei 


irchf 




rreti 


rfor 


iwar 


c 


>ntg 


0) 

u 


c 




a; 

s 


Ibot 


_c 

'S. 


com 


1 




< 


< 


c 

< 


m 


U 


es 
O 


cS 

O 


O 


U 


o 

Q 




O 


CS 

trj 


o 

a 








P 


y} 


o 










Grand Total . . 


*179 


11 


8 


*36 


1 


5 


9 


8 


6 


7 


8 


5 


8 


4 


4 


12 


15 


3 


2 


5 


3 


10 


5 


4 



COUNTY JUNIOR-SENIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



Total 


120 


Q 

O 


A 

t 


•J 


1 

i. 





o 
o 




2 


g 


g 





Q 

O 


A 

'k 


A 

1 


n 
1 


1 n 


Q 
O 


O 


4 


o 
o 


7 


5 


4 


26- 


- 50 


3 


















1 










1 














1 






51- 


- 100 


14 










1 




1 




3 






1 




1 










2 


1 




4 




101- 


- 150. . . . 


13 




1 






1 


i 


2 


1 




"i 


2 


1 




1 






1 












1 


151- 


- 200 


17 


2 


1 






3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 




2 




1 












1 


201- 


- 250 


10 


1 








2 


3 




1 


1 


1 














1 






251- 


- 300 


10 






1 




1 




2 








1 




1 






1 


1 




1 




1 


301- 


350. . . . 


14 
















1 


1 


3 






1 


i 




2 


1 


1 


1 




1 




1 


351- 


- 400 


7 
























2 








3 










2 






401- 


450 


2 








1 






















1 


















451- 


- 500 


2 


1> 




























1 
















501- 


550 


3 


1 












1 
































551- 


600. . 


3 




1 
















1 




















1 






601- 


650 .... 


2 
























1 






1 


















651- 


700 


1 
3 
































1 
















751- 


800. . . . 






1 






1 




















1 
















801- 


850 


2 


















1 












1 
















851- 


900. . . . 


3 


1 






























1 












1 




901- 


950. . . . 


1 






























1 
















951- 


1000. . . . 


2 




1 


























1 


















1001- 


1050. . . . 


1 




1 












































1151- 


1200 


1 










































1 






1351- 


1400 


2 






2 










































1401- 


1450 


1 


1 














































1451- 


1500 


1| 






1 










































1501- 


1550. . . . 


Ij 






1 










































1701- 


1750 


1 


1 















































COUNTY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



Total 


*59 


25 or less . . 


5 


26- 50 


9i 


51- 100. .. . 


13 


101- 150. . . . 


7 


151- 200 


5 


201- 250. . . . 


5 


251- 300 


3 


301- 350 


1 


351- 400 


1 


401- 450. .. . 


2 


451- 500 


1 


551- 600 


2 


651- 700 


3 


701- 750 


1 


1001-1050 


1 



*29 



* Includes twenty-three seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a 
junior high school curriculum. 

For teaching staff in individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



147 



TABLE 93 — Number of Maryland County Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior, and 
Regular High Schools by County — Number of Teachers and by County — Average 
Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1949 









"a! 




























09 
















Number of 






T3 


























>. 












c 






Teachers 

Average 
Number 


Schools 


>> 
c 
a 


ne Arun 


Itimore 


Ivert 


roline 


rroll 




arles 


irchester 


?derick 


rrett 


rford 


ward 


c 


s 

o 

c 

o 


ince Geo 


een Anr 


Mary's 


merset 


Ihot 


o 


o 
S 


u 

1 


Belonging 


s: 
< 


< 


c 
< 


m 


O 


m 
O 


U 




O 


o 






C 


CO 

X 


o 
« 


0) 




£ 


3 

O" 




o 


E- 






O 


All Schools . . . 


36 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 




2 


1 


1 


1 


6 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 



NUMBER OF SCHOOLS BY NUMBER OF TEACHERS 



**2 

































**2 






























*1 


















1 










** 
2 


1 










1 


















*1 














1 








1 
1 








1 
1 










1 


















1 








1 


1 




*1 


1 


1 




1 














1 






1 
















1 
































1 














1 
























1 
1 




























1 




















1 










1 


1 






















1 










1 











































NUMBER OF SCHOOLS BY AVERAGE NUMBER BELONGING 



51-100 


5 


101-150 


**7 


151-200 


6 


201-250. . . . 


*7 


251-300 


3 


301-350. . . 


2 


351-400. . . . 


3 


451-500 


1 


551-600. . . . 


1 


901-950 


1 

















*1 
1 
1 
















**2 
*1 




1 










*1 
*1 


1 




1 






1 


1 




















1 










2 










1 


1 








1 




1 






1 




1 


1 




*1 
1 


1 




















1 








1 








1 
























1 




















1 














1 










1 








1 






















1 














1 











































Each asterisk represents one junior high school. 

For teaching staff and average number belonging in individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



148 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 94 

Number of Teachers and Enrollment by Subiect; Adult Education Classes: 
Counties of Maryland: 1948-49 



County 


Number 


Enrollment 


of 

Teachers 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Business 
Education 


General 


Total Counties 


448 


13,692 


755 


2,580 


2,041 


1,775 


6,541 


WHITE ADULTS 


All Counties 


389 


12.133 


703 


2,096 


1,989 


1,537 


5,808 


Alleganv 


57 


2,146 


588 


555 


293 


216 


494 


Anne Arundel .... 


14 


331 


31 


121 


73 




106 


Baltimore 


103 


2,804 




251 


306 


308 


1,939 


Calvert 
















Caroline 


' 5 


95 




15 




52 


"28 


Carroll 


10 


202 




40 


21 


59 


82 


Cecil 
















Charles 
















Dorchester 


li 


301 


25 






63 


213 


Frederick 


4 


123 




97 






26 


Garrett 


1 


19 


19 










Harford 


48 


1,222 




202 




385 


635 


Howard 


3 


79 


16 








63 


Kent 


6 


153 




37 




39 


77 


Montgomery 


59 


3,099 




597 


-789 


245 


1,468 


Prince George's . . . 


26 


572 




39 


98 


127 


308 


Queen Anne's .... 
















St. Mary's 


' i 


66 






33 




33 


Somerset 
















Talbot 


' 1 


i46 


24 


24 




27 


71 


Washington 


26 


617 




81 


376 




160 


Wicomico 


6 


123 




18 






105 


Worcester 


2 


35 




19 




16 





COLORED ADULTS 



All Counties 


59 


1,559 


52 


484 


52 


238 


733 


Allegany 














102 


Anne Arundel .... 


10 


260 




70 


37 


'5i 


Baltimore 


13 


265 




110 




49 


106 


Calvert 
















Caroline 




18 








18 




Carroll 
















Cecil 


' 2 


'48 










'48 


Charles. .' 
















Dorchester 


' 4 


143 


34 


'72 




23 


'ii 


Frederick 
















Garrett 














'60 


Harford 


' '8 


219 




i3i 




'28 


Howard 
















Kent 


' 2 


36 


18 


'l8 






76 


Montgomery 


7 


216 




71 


15 


54 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 






























St. Mary's 
















Somerset 














'28 


Talbot 


' 3 


40 




12 






Washington 












i5 


299 




' 9 


314 








Worcester 

















Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



TABLE 95 — Descriptive Titles of Courses Offered in Maryland County Adult Educa- 
tion Program Under Classic cations of Agriculture, Home Economics, Trade and 
Industries, Business Education, and General, 1948-1949 



Type of Course 


Number 

of 
Classes 


Type of Course 


Number 

of 
Classes 


- 

Agriculture 

Agriculture 


3 


General 

Adult Recreation 


4 


Farm Machinery and Repairing 


5 


Americanization 


6 


Farm Mechanics 


5 


Art 


11 


Food Processing 


2 


Arts and Crafts 


19 


Soil Conservation 


2 


Art — Painting 


3 






Ceramics 


32 


Total 


17 


Child Study 


2 




Community Chorus 


7 


Home Economics 




Dramatics 


3 


Clothing Construction 


84 
8 


Driver Training & Safety Education 


3 


Family lafe Education 


English and English Fundamentals . 


11 


Food Preservation 


13 
9 


English and History 


1 


Home Crafts 


First Aid for Bus Drivers 


2 


Home Furnishings 


5 


Furniture Repair and Refinishing. . . 
Health Training & Phy. Education . 
Health Training for Men 


14 


Total 


119 


6 

5 




Health Training for Women 


2 


Trade and Industries 




Home Arts 


15 


Arc Welding . . 


8 


Industrial Arts 


2 


Auto Mechanics 


6 


Jewelry and Gem Cutting 


9 


Blue Print Reading 


8 


Leadership Training in Child Study . 
Mathematics 


1 


Bricklaying 


36 
10 
3 


5 


C.A.A. Instruction 


Mathematics and Science 


1 


Cabinet Work 


Medical Chemistry for Nurses 


1 


Carpentry 


2 


Mental Hygiene 


1 


Drafting 


7 


Meteorology 


1 


Electricity 


6 


Modern Foreign Languages 


16 


Furniture Repair Renovation 


1 


Music — Instrumental and Vocal. . . . 


13 


Home Mechanics 


1 


Parent Education— Child Study . . . 
Photography 


15 


Machine Shop Practice 


11 
4 


6 


Mathematics 


Physics 


2 


Radio 


2 


Plastics 


4 


Related Instruction Classes for 




Practical Nursing 


4 


Apprentices 


3 


Psychology 


6 






Paplic Speaking 


5 


Total 


108 


Radio Receiving and Transmitting . 
Reading, Writing, Arithmetic 


1 




2 


Distributive Education 






8 


Merchandising 


1 


Wood Shop 


9 


Business Education 




Total 


258 


Bookkeeping 


4 




Business Administration 


2 






Business Arithmetic 


1 






Shorthand 


16 






Typing 


45 






Typing and Shorthand 


4 






Total 


72 







150 Eighty-Third Annual Report 

TABLE 96— Enrollment in Adult Education Classes: Baltimore City: 1948 and 1949 



Enrollment 



Type of Class 


White 


Colored 


1947 


1948 


1949* 


1947 


1948 


1949* 


Total 


8,237 


17,279 


8,702 


2,988 


6,347 


5,119 


... 

Americanization 


363 


465 


573 










3,048 


7,590 


2,710 


l,i73 


2,725 


1,614 


Elementary 


50 


480 


130 


660 


1,356 


657 


Secondary 


2,998 


7,110 


2,580 


513 


1,369 


957 




873 


2,079 


424 


293 




147 


Vocational 






58 






147 


Distributive Education 


873 


2,079 


366 


293 








1,425 


1,116 


1,175 


1,163 


1,582 


1,956 


Industrial 


1,192 




663 


563 




986 


Home Economics 


233 




512 


600 




970 


Parent Education 


1,212 


2,674 


1,378 


359 


928 


544 


Industrial Program 


852 




180 






46 


Informal Program 


464 


4i6 


t525 






40 


Vocational Education (Veterans) 




974 


191 




907 


672 


Veterans Institute 




846 


93 




205 


100 


Foremanship and Apprentice 


















1,119 


1,440 









* Decrease due to change in method of reporting: previous years show total enrollment: for 1948-49 

average net roll is given, 
t Includes 13 in class for hard-of-hearing. 



TABLE 97— Enrollment in Baltimore Citv Summer Schools: 1939-1948 and by Type 

* of School, 1948 









Net Roll at End of Term 
















Number 


Type of School 


Number 


Total 




Taking 


of 

Principals 


of 


Enroll- 








and 




Schools 


ment 


Total 






Teachers 










Review 


Advance 












Work 


Work 




All Schools 














1939 


14 


7,003 


6,208 


5,505 


703 


121 


1940 


14 


6,988 


6,135 


5,370 


765 


127 


1941 


14 


6,494 


5,728 


4,987 


741 


120 


1942 


15 


6,994 


6,154 


4,819 


1,335 


147 


1943 


14 


6,357 


5,483 


4,548 


935 


130 


1944 


13 


6,874 


5,976 


5,108 


868 


142 


1945 


13 


6,465 


5,750 


5,052 


698 


123 


1946 


12 


6,851 


6,159 


5,428 


731 


122 


1947 


12 


6,565 


6,039 


5,287 


752 


146 


1948* 


5 


3,686 


3,421 


2,895 


526 


86 


White Schools 


3 


2,801 


2,566 


2,288 


278 


61 


Secondary 








Senior 


1 


1,978 


1,829 


1.745 


84 


39 


Junior 


1 


617 


543 


543 




14 


Demonstration 


1 


206 


194 




194 


10 


Colored Schools 


2 


885 


855 


607 


248 


24 


Secondary 














Senior 




333 


331 


252 


79 


8 


Junior 


) ' 


378 


355 


355 




8 




1 


174 


169 




169 


8 



* No elementary review schools beginning 1948. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



151 



TABLE 98 

Number of Pupils Reported Enrolled* in Maryland Schools and Institutions for 
Atypical Children, Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Name and Location 


Enrollment 


Total Number of 
Different Teachers 
















Nursery 


Kinder- 
garten 


Ele- 
mentary 


Secondary 


Full- 
time 


Part- 
time 



WHITE 



Children's Rehabilitation Inst., 














Cockeysville 






75 




8 




Child Study Center, Baltimore . . 






34 




3 




Eric Bowditch Hospital School, 














Ruxton 






12 


3 


2 


1 


Garden School, Baltimore .... 






11 




1 


3 


Jr. League Nursery School for 














Deaf, Baltimore 


10 








2 




Maryland School for Blind, 














Overlea 




6 


61 


21 


16 




Maryland School for Deaf, 














Frederick 




19 


112 


24 


17 




Maryland Training School foi 














Boys, Loch Raven 






380 


59 


6 




Matthews School, Rodgers Forge 


" 4 




6 




2 




Montrose School for Girls, 














Reisterstown 






86 


50 


13 




Nursery School for Cerebral 














Palsy, Baltimore 


20 








3 


3 


Reinhardt School for Deaf, 














Kensington 


10 


9 


9 




2 




Rosewood State Training School, 














Owings Mills 




38 


123 




9 


2 


St. Mary's Industrial School, 




















84 




9 




School of the Chimes, Baltimore . 






9 




2 


"i 


Twin Maples, Baltimore 






19 




3 


1 



COLORED 



Barrett School for Girls, Glen 














Burnie 






79 




4 


5 


Boys' Village of Maryland, Inc., 














Cheltenham 






165 


1 


7 




Croome Settlement, Croome .... 






52 




1 


' 5 


Maryland School for Blind, 














Overlea 




2 


22 


1 


5 




Dept. for Colored Deaf . . . 




9 


37 




6 


■ 2 



* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



152 Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 99 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered During the Year Ending 

June 30, 1949 





Total 




R • 






our vey eo j 


i^iosea — 


l^r^TTXJTV 


N^ umber 


Reha- 


Jf oiiowed 


i. raining 


X repared 


Being 


Other 




Cases 


bilitated 


on Jobs 


Completed 


for J obs 


Counseled 


Services 


Tnfnl ?statp 


3 773 


837 


77 


239 


681 


1 498 


441 


■R If* n'4- 


1 914 


430 


38 


129 


371 


DOO 






1 859 


407 


39 


110 


310 


840 


153 


Allegany 


170 


40 




g 


19 


84 


19 


AnnG Arundd .... 


96 


16 


3 


5 


31 


31 


10 


Baltimore 


264 


58 


6 


18 


55 


109 


18 




15 










D 






40 


g 




1 


4 


21 


g 


Carroll 


56 


9 


■ ~ 


3 




16 


12 


Cecil 


70 


17 




2 


10 


34 


g 


Charles 


33 


7 




3 


8 


13 


2 


Dorchester 


61 


13 


' 1 


3 


11 


27 


6 


Frederick 


71 


19 


3 


6 


9 


25 


9 


Garrett 


49 


12 




1 


2 


26 


8 


Harford 


77 


19 


' 2 


2 


12 


41 


1 




33 


6 


3 


2 


5 


11 


6 


Kent 


38 


3 


1 


2 


5 


23 


4 


Montgomery 


138 


25 




4 


21 


82 


6 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


203 


50 


' 8 


19 


29 


88 


9 


48 


8 


3 


2 


5 


23 


7 


St. Mary's 


21 


1 




1 


4 


15 




Somerset 


42 


8 




7 


6 


20 


■ i 


Talbot 


28 


4 






6 


17 


1 


Washington 


146 


37 


' 2 


12 


23 


58 


14 


Wicomico 


117 


32 




6 


20 


52 


7 


Worcester 


43 


11 


" 1 


2 


10 


18 


1 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED ; 



Char- 


Total 


Reha- 


Othert 


Char- 


Total 


Reha- 


Othert 


acteristic 




bilitated* 


acteristic 




bilitated* 


Total Number . . 


3,773 


837 


2,936 


Race 












White 


2,888 


674 


2,214 


Age 








Colored .... 


884 


162 


722 


Under 21 


1,220 


203 


1,017 


Other 




1 




21-30 


841 


216 


625 










31-40 


724 


196 


528 


Sex 








41-50 


547 


132 


415 


Male 


2,584 


565 


2,019 


Over 50 


441 


90 


351 


Female .... 


1,189 


272 


917 


Education 








Marital Status 








None 


111 


21 


90 


Single 


2,050 


385 


1,665 


1-3 


256 


36 


220 


Married . . . 


1,297 


351 


946 


4-6 


735 


162 


573 


Other 


426 


101 


325 


7-9 


1,323 


291 


1,032 






10-12 


817 


178 


639 


Employment 








H.S. Graduate 


366 


105 


261 


History (At 








13-14 


91 


28 


63 


time of sur- 








15-16 


47 


12 


35 


vey) 








College 


25 


4 


21 


Employed . . 


411 


161 


250 


Unknown .... 


2 




2 


LTnemployed 


3,362 














Never 








Dependents 








worked . . 




163 


827 





2,337 


460 


1,877 


Worked at 








1 


516 


110 


406 


some time 




513 


1,859 


2 


339 


94 


245 










3 


219 


68 


151 


Number on 








4 


136 


45 


91 


Welfare (At 








5 


103 


28 


75 


time of 








Over 5 


123 


32 


91 


survey) .... 


388 


71 


317 



* Clisats who were rehabilitated into employ msnt during year (837). 
t Clients who were still receving service at end of year (2,936). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



TABLE 100 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered Year Ending 

June 30, 1949 





Total 
Expenditure 


N^umbGr 
of Clients 


xx V tri 

Cost 


Total Expenditure 

£jX£LiTiiri3.t^ions (Dis^nosis) 

Medical 

Psychiatric 


$196,381.40 

10,664.98 
185.00 


1,080 
17 


$9.88 
10.88 


Treatment 






Medical 


1,075.54 


41 


26.24 


Psychiatric 


1,801.00 


16 


112.56 


Surgical 


9,978.00 


95 


105.03 


Dental 


1,140.00 


6 


190.00 


Prosthetic Appliances 








Artificial limb(s) 


10,614.00 


70 


151.63 




7 121 29 


54 


131.87 


Braces 


3!865!25 


70 


55!21 


Glasses 


1,268.55 


86 


14.75 


Surgical appliances 


584.35 


13 


44.92 


Repairs to appliances 


181.90 


17 


107.05 


Hospitalization 


23,186.66 


129 


179.74 


Convalescent Home Care 


1,517.64 


9 


168.67 


Physical and Occupational Therapy . . . 


1,619.84 


37 


43.78 


Transportation 








Medical services 


827.07 


156 


5.30 


Maintenance 








Medical services 


220.15 


23 


9.57 


Training 








Educational institution 


45,831.85 


325 


141.02 


Employment . 


2,692.15 


37 


72.76 


Coirespondence 


334.70 


16 


20.94 


Tutorial 


5,379.57 


82 


65.61 


Training supplies and equipment 


7,450.40 


195 


38.21 


Maintenance 


53,291.57 


215 


247.86 


Transportation 


4,023.03 


249 


16.16 


Occupational Tools and Equipment .... 


1,009.27 


20 


5.05 


Occupational licenses 


51.75 


10 


5.18 


Miscellaneous 


465.89 


61 


7.64 



154 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



CHART 2 

Total School Current Expenses and Total State Aid: Counties of Maryland 
and Baltimore City: 1923-1949 




I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 
1925 1928 1955 1958 19A5 19^8 1955 



Year 



See footnote a on TABLE 101. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



155 



TABLE 101 

Disbursements for Current Expenses, Debt Service, and Capital Outlay: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1923-1949 



School Year 


Current Expenses by Source of Funds 


Debt 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total 


State 


Federalt 


Local 


Service 



total state 



1923 
1928 
1933 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 



$12,764,250 
16,147,689 
16,873,271 
19,241,146 
19,964,102 
20,598,186 
21,347,680 
21,988,929 
21,927,683 
25,177,130 
26,436,523 
29,232,564 
34,579,206 
52,534,125 
58,840,291 



$3,058,180 
3,207,088 
3,604,406 
5,160,297 
5,250,038 
5,368,777 
5,344,511 
5,758,744 
5,752,513 
8,039,004 
7,582,813 
9,268,057 
9,834,584 
a21, 790,976 
a24,226,540 



$46,966 
69,150 
89,006 
228,591 
221,939 
222,905 
*224,673 
*241,047 
*252,903 
*229,721 
*289,901 
266,876 
267,308 
t973,998 
tl,242.099 



$9,659,104 
12,871,451 
13,179,859 
13,852,258 
14,492,125 
15,006,504 
15,778,496 
15,989,138 
15,922,267 
16,908,405 
18,563,809 
19,697,631 
24,477,314 
29,769,151 
33,371,652 



$789,311 
2,131,699 
3,142,211 
3,739,854 
3,901,004 
3,985,448 
3,964,528 
4,055,300 
3,776,207 
4,119,423 
4,063,754 
4,192,979 
3,878,466 
4,506,683 
4,893,175 



1923 
1928 
1933 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 



$6,799 
8,360, 
8,388. 
9,347, 
9,747, 
9,845, 
10,238, 
10,301, 
9,741, 
11,012, 
11,398, 
12,056, 
13,321, 
19,582, 
22,573, 



,794 
391 
125 
234 
952 
208 
979 
657 
713 
413 
134 
034 
612 
519 



BALTIMORE CITY 



$1,052,845 
999,753 
1,072,738 
941,150 
950,005 
953,033 
937,901 
930,151 
921,520 
1,662,672 
1,342,119 
1,451,523 
1,480,161 
a3, 673, 570 
05,049,171 



$13,256 
17,240 
10,663 
83,737 
55,923 
56,690 
*57,256 
*55,978 
*64,354 
*45,953 
*75,627 
77,328 
61,361 
t252,793 
tl93,133 



$5,733,693 
7,343,398 
7,304,724 
8,322,347 
8,742,024 
8,835,485 
9,243,822 
9,315,528 
8,755,839 
9,303,788 
9,980,388 
10,527,183 
11,780,090 
15,656,156 
17,331,594 



$685,620 
1,580,599 
1,983,157 
2,335,256 
2,317,869 
2,304,428 
2,291,143 
2,277,294 
2,105,427 
2,192,721 
2,210,496 
2,349,885 
1,958,255 
2,307,374 
1,628,980 



$4,776,355 
3,430,589 
1,956,656 
2,335,564 
2,876,322 
2,786,810 
1,262,309 
1,721,378 
834,802 
432,259 
817,053 
2,197,635 
3,547,469 
10,681,767 
20,338,146 



$3,301,086 
1.897,871 
1,268,159 
759,130 
30,785 
13,032 
145,492 
238,119 
17,989 
8,721 
113,214 
605,127 
372,505 
431,267 
823,371 



TOTAL COUNTIES 



1923 
1928 
1933 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 



$5,964,456 
7,787,298 
8,485,146 
9,893,912 
10,216,150 
10,752,978 
11,108,701 
11,687,272 
12,185,970 
14,164,717 
15,038,389 
17,176,530 
21,257,594 
32,951,606 
36,266,393 



$2,005,335 
2,207,335 
2,531,668 
4,219,147 
4,300,033 
4,4L5,744 
4,406,610 
4,828,593 
4,830,993 
6,376,332 
6,240,694 
7,816,534 
8,354,423 
al8,117,406 
019,177,369 



$33,710 
51,910 
78,343 
144,854 
166,016 
166,215 
*167,417 
*185,069 
*188,549 
*183,768 
*214,274 
189,548 
205,947 
J72 1,205 
U,048,966 



$3,925,411 
5,528,053 
5,875,135 
5,529,911 
5,750,101 
6,171,019 
6,534,674 
6,673,610 
7,166,428 
7,604,617 
8,583,421 
9,170,448 
12,697,224 
14,112,995 
16,040,058 



$103,691 
551,100 
1,159,054 
1,404,598 
1,583,135 
1,681,020 
1,673,385 
1,778,006 
1,670,780 
1,926.702 
1,853,258 
1,843,094 
1,920,211 
2,199,309 
3,264,195 



$1,475,269 
1,532,718 
688,497 
1,576,434 
2,845,537 
2,773,778 
1,116,817 
1,483,259 
816,813 
423,538 
703,839 
1.592,508 
3,174,964 
10.250,500 
19,514,775 



Excludes expenditures for vocational training of war production workers. 

^fP^^dityres by the Federal Government for salaries and operating expenses are included for all 
^ears lor the Indian Head School in Charles County and beginning in 1945 for the Frank Knox School 
in St. Mary s County. 

o State funds for the retirement of county teachers have been excluded from all vears since they became 
eligible in 1937, except for the following inclusions: 1948, $1,698,860; 1949, .$2,925,353. State and City 
lunds for the retirement of teachers in Baltimore City are included in all vears since 1937. 

+ l-ederal funds for school lunches have been excluded from all years since the inception of the program 
except for the following inclusions: 

1948 1949 

Total State $540,750 $597,564 

Baltimore City 132,232 138,245 

Total Counties 408,518 459.319 



156 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



CHART 3 

Per Cent of Current Expenditure: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1949 




For basic data, see TABLE 102. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



157 



TABLE 102 

Sources of Current Expenses*: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1949 













Per 


Cent from Each Source 


























-= j- 

Local 




Total 






Local Levy 


















Levy 




Current 


Statet 


Federalt 


and Other 


















and 


County 


Funds 




Local Sources 






Equal- 






Fed- 


Other 












Total 


ization 


Other 


eral 


Local 
















Fund 










Sourc's 


Total 1947-48 


$51,269,132.56 


$20,564,483.39 


t$935,498.18 


$29,769,150.99 


40 


1 


16 


3 


23 


8 


1 


8 


.58.1 


State 1948-49 


57,669,577.66 


23,055,807.47 


11,242,099.37 


33,371,670.82 


40 





15 


5 


24 


5 


2 


1 


57.9 


Balto. City. . 


x22,573,916.10 


x5, 049, 170. 72 


193,133.03 


a-17,331, 612.35 


22 


4 






22 


4 





9 


76.7 


Tot. Counties 


°35,095,661.56 


°18,006,636.75 


1,048,966.34 


16,040,058.47 


51 


3 


25 


5 


25 


8 


3 





45.7 


Allegany. . . 


2,740,191.32 


1,456,332.37 


203,817.38 


1,080,041.57 


53 


2 


32 


5 


20 


7 


7 


4 


39.4 


An. Arundel 


2,418,775.78 


1,363,364.98 


50,791.94 


1,004,618.86 


56 


4 


33 


3 


23 


1 


2 


1 


41.5 


Baltimore . . 


4,772,598.54 


1,150,299.20 


84,589.36 


3,537,709.98 


24 


1 






24 


1 


1 


8 


74.1 


Calvert 


443,257.09 


312,476.11 


20,849.27 


109,931.71 


70 


5 


48 


6 


21 


9 


4 


7 


24.8 


Caroline . . . 


546,258.87 


393,544.96 


13,846.55 


138,867.36 


72 


1 


49 





23 


1 


2 


5 


25.4 


Carroll 


1,094,249.79 


661,797.07 


32,087.48 


400,365.24 


60 


5 


36 


9 


23 


6 


2 


9 


36.6 


Cecil 


867,210.80 


417,919.01 


14,990.50 


434,301.29 


48 


2 


25 


8 


22 


4 


1 




50.1 


Charles 


a715,864.91 


507,310.60 


a75,558.53 


132,995.78 


70 


8 


48 





22 


8 


alO 


6 


18.6 


Dorchester . 


796,300.22 


523,026.64 


19,434.05 


253,839.53 


65 


7 


43 


8 


21 


9 


2 


4 


31.9 


Frederick . . 


1,409,436.05 


789,976.63 


45,936.10 


573,523.32 


56 





32 


6 


23 


4 


3 


3 


40.7 


Garrett 


829,859.85 


621,339.63 


17,267.36 


191,252.86 


74 


9 


53 


7 


21 


2 


2 


1 


23.0 


Harford .... 


1,299,790.89 


524,213.41 


43,913.48 


731,664.00 


40 


3 


17 


6 


22 


7 


3 


4 


56.3 


Howard .... 


635,357.78 


409,859.79 


21,126.15 


204,371.84 


64 


5 


41 


4 


23 




3 


3 


32.2 


Kent 


451,124.10 


273,302.37 


11,234.51 


166,587.22 


60 


6 


39 


2 


21 


4 


2 


5 


36.9 


Montgome'y 


4,430,977.11 


1,280,083.90 


110,810.07 


3,040,083.14 


28 


9 


11 


7 


17 


2 


2 


5 


68.6 


Pr. George's 


3,871,740.18 


2,122,742.22 


77,122.22 


1,671,875.74 


54 


8 


31 


9 


22 


9 


2 





43.2 


Qu. Anne's . 


482,639.81 


298,522.73 


10,198.40 


173,918.68 


61 


9 


41 





20 


9 


2 


1 


36.0 


St. Mary's . 


0493,605.61 


324,646.54 


040,717.82 


128,241.25 


65 


8 


43 


8 


22 





a8 


2 


26.0 


Somerset. . . 


554,773.79 


413,976.70 


21,669.81 


119,127.28 


74 


6 


50 


5 


24 


1 


3 


9 


21.5 


Talbot 


528,637.35 


314,404.36 


12,686.76 


201,546.23 


59 


5 


36 


1 


23 


4 


2 


4 


38.1 


Washington 


2,415,743.82 


1,225,187.33 


89,699.75 


1,100,856.74 


50 


7 


29 


8 


20 


9 


3 


7 


45.6 


Wicomico . . 


907,389.96 


475,689.82 


20,468.07 


411,232.07 


52 


4 


29 


5 


22 


9 


2 


3 


45.3 


Worcester. ■ 


635,256.94 


391,999.38 


10,150.78 


233,106.78 


61 


7 


39 


1 


22 


6 


1 


6 


36.7 



* Excludes expenditures made by county. City and State health departments for services rendered public school 
pupils. 

t State and Federal aid are reported here on an accrued basis: payments for 1948-49 received after June 30, 1949 
are included, and those for 1947-48 received after June 30, 1948 are excluded. 

X Funds in the amount of $579,249.47 for the school lunch program were excluded from this table in the 1947-48 
report but are included here. 

X Funds for teachers in the Employees' Retirement System are included as follows: State $1,195,872.00; local 
$355,825.00; total $1,551,697.00. 

° Includes $1,729,481.00 for the Teachers' Retirement System not distributed over the counties in these columns. 

a Includes Federal funds for salaries and other current expenses as follows: Charles County, Indian Head School 
$52,739.51—7.4%; St. Mary's County, Frank Knox School $36,411.07— 7.47c. 



158 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



CHART 4 

Distribution of Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses: 
Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Including Transportation 



SALAR/ES 
6LZt 



Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



TABLE 103 

Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of Education 



Total State . . . . 
Baltimore City . 
Total Counties . 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore. . 

Calvert 

Caroline 



Carroll 
Cecil . . . 
Charles . . . 
Dorchester . 
Frederick . 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard . 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George'; 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's 
Somerset . 
Talbot 



Washington 
Wicomico . . 
Worcester . . 



EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 











Current 


Expenses 








County 


General 
Control 

I 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 
of 

Teachers 


Books, Ma- 
terials and 

Other Costs 
of Instruc- 
tion 


Opera- 
tion 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agen- 
cies* 


Fixed 
Charges and 
Payments to 
Adjoining 
Counties 


I Capital 

'OUTLAYf 

1 
1 






INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 






Total State . . . 


2.9 


1.7 


63.6 


3.8 










18. 1 


25 .7 








7.2 


3.5 


9.2 


Baltimore City 


3.4 


1.7 


67.7 


2.8 




9.0 


2.5 


5.9 


XT .0 


[ 3.5 


Total Counties . . . 


2.6 


1.7 


61.2 


4,5 




6.0 


4.0 


11 .2 


4,0 , 


1 1 
1 00 . 1 


Allegany 


2.6 


16 
1.4 

1.7 
1.8 


67.5 
66.6 
70.4 
58.6 
65.2 


3,5 
4.6 








14.5 
10.7 






Anne Arundel .... 
Baltimore. . 


3.0 
2.2 




7.1 
7.3 


2.8 
5.9 


, 4 
, 5 


3.6 
54 . 6 


Calvert . . . 


4.9 


5.6 




6.4 


4.3 


8.8 
22.5 


u . 


56 , 1 


Caroline 


2,9 


2 2 


2.8 




4,8 


4.0 


U . 


42 , 3 








4.0 




4,5 


3.5 


17.0 


. 7 


11,4 


Carroll 


2.7 


2.0 


66.7 
66,4 
62,8 
63.3 
66.5 








3.1 


14.4 






Cecil 


2,6 


1,8 
1,8 


5.0 
4.9 




5,2 


, 9 


24 ,6 


Charles .... 


2,5 




7,3 


4.7 


11.3 


1,0 


5.6 


Dorchester. . . 


3,0 


1,8 
1,7 


5.0 
2.8 
3.8 




7.8 
7.1 


3.0 


15,1 


2.0 


19 


Frederick . . 


2.1 




5.8 


15,1 


1 1 


Q Q 
. 








6.0 


3.2 


16,0 


1 


13 . 9 


Garrett 


3.4 


1,6 
2,1 
1.8 
2.8 


61.1 
66.5 
65.6 
65.4 
63.3 










16,7 






Harford . . . 


2.7 


6.0 
4.8 




4.4 


4.1 


2 . 7 


5 . 3 


Howard . . . 


3.1 




6.3 


5.7 


11,4 


0,5 


53.6 


Kent. . . . 


4.3 


4.4 




6.4 


3.4 


14.8 


, 5 


44 . 7 


Montgomery .... 


3.1 


1.8 


2.8 
7.8 




5.8 
8.6 


2.9 
4.1 


15.4* 
10.7 


, 6 
6 


15 . 1 
34 6 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's . . 


3.1 
3.0 
3.7 


1.7 
2.5 
2.9 


68.9 
61.3 
60.6 
65.3 


4.3 
4.9 




6.6 
5.0 


5.5 
4.8 


9.3 
17.7 


0.6 
0,8 


45.0 
2.9 


Somerset 


3.2 


2.2 


5.0 
2.8 




6.5 


3.9 


16.8 


0,6 


0,4 


Talbot . 


2.9 


2 3 




5.1 


5.4 


15.6 


0,4 


4 3 








66.0 


3.0 




5.4 


5.4 


14.2 


0.8 


17,7 


Washington . . . 
Wicomico .... 


2.8 
2.9 


1.9 
1.6 
1.4 


70.8 
64.5 
64.4 


4.1 




5.3 


4.0 


10.6 


0,5 


19,4 


Worcester 


2.8 


4.5 




5.9 


4.6 


13.7 


2.3 


45,9 






2.9 




5.5 


5.4 


16.2 


1.4 


23,5 



3,1 


1.7 


67.0 


4.1 


7.5 


3.6 


4.5 


t8.5 


26.7 


3,4 


1.7 


67.9 


2.7 


9.0 


2.5 


5.8 


J7.0 


] 3.5 


2,9 


1.8 


66.5 


4.9 


6.6 


4.4 


3.4 


:9.5 


36 9 


2,8 
3,3 
2,4 
5,9 
3,4 


1.9 
1.5 
1.8 
2.2 
2.6 


71 9 

72.6 
75.3 
71.2 
76.2 


3 7 
5.1 
6.0 
3.4 
4.7 


7.6 
8.0 
6.9 
5.8 
5.2 


3.0 
6.4 
4.6 
4.9 
4.0 


8.7 
2.6 
2 3 
5.9 
3.1 


0.4 
5 
0.7 
0.7 
0.8 


3.8 
56.7 
57.8 
47.1 
1 13.1 


3,1 
3,0 
2,9 
3,4 
2.4 


2.3 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2,0 


74.9 
73,3 
71.8 
72.5 
75.5 


5.6 
5.4 
5.8 
3 3 
4.3 


5.9 
8.1 
8.9 
8.2 
6 9 


3.5 
5.2 
3.4 
6.7 
3.7 


3.6 
1.9 
2.9 
2.6 
4 3 


11 

1.1 
2.3 
13 
0.9 


26.8 
j 6.2 
i 2.2 
9.4 

15.6 


4.0 

2 9 
3.6 
4 9 

3 2 


1.9 
2.2 

2 1 

3 2 
1.9 


71.7 
71 .7 
74.3 
74.9 
66.8 


7.1 
5.2 
4.9 
3.2 
8.2 


5.1 
6.7 
7.2 
6 6 
9.0 


4 9 
6.2 
4 1 
3 3 
4.3 


2 
4.6 

3 2 
3 2 
6.0 


3 3 
0.5 
0.6 
0.7 
0.6 


6 1 

55.4 
47.9 
16 9 
35 8 


3.4 
3 5 
4.3 
3 6 
3 3 


1.8 
3.0 
3.5 
2.5 
2.6 


73.6 
72.4 
72.1 
74.2 
75.1 


4.5 
5.7 
5.9 
3.2 
3.4 


7.1 
5.9 
7.7 
5.7 
6.1 


5.9 
5.7 
4.6 
6.1 
6.1 


3 1 

2.8 
1.2 

4 2 
2.5 


0.6 
1.0 
0.7 
0.5 
0.9 


46 6 
3.4 
0.5 
4.8 

19.6 


3.0 
3.3 
3.3 


2.0 
1.8 
1.6 


74.8 
72.3 
75.7 


4.4 
5.0 
3 4 


5.6 
6.6 
6.5 


4.2 
5.2 
6.3 


5.5 
3.2 
15 


5 
2 6 
1.7 


20.3 
48.8 
26.5 



health offices. --P-uu.turt.s lor neaicn services rendered public school pupils by county, City and State 

debt ser'vS^^'' ""^'^^""^ '^^''^^ ""^'^^ by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding 

teail^^^^ti^^^tS^ ^ri^^:' Si^^Mr^"^ --^^ 



160 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 104 

Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: General Control: State of Maryland: 

1942, 1945, 1948, 1949 



County 



1942 


1945 


1948 


1949 


County 


1942 


1945 


1948 


1949 


$2 


38 


$2 


67 


$4 


75 


$5 


63 


Garrett 


$3 


03 


$3 


68 


$5 


68 


$6 


19 














Harford 


63 


2 


02 


3 


73 


4 


63 


3 


14 


3 


32 


5 


51 


7 


06 


Howard 


2 


28 


2 


87 


5 


23 


5 


39 


















Kent 


3 


56 


4 


07 


8 


10 


8 


55 


1 


90 


2 


27 


4 


31 


4 


84 


Montgomery 


1 


66 


2 


80 


6 


09 


6 


45 


1 


48 


1 


92 


4 


46 


4 


76 


Princf George's. . . 


1 


47 


1 


41 


4 


15 


5 


02 


1 


98 


2 


53 


4 


84 


4 


69 


Queen Anne's 


3 


51 


4 


38 


5 


35 


5 


84 


1 


41 


1 


41 


2 


53 


3 


24 


St. Mary's 


4 


02 


4 


53 


6 


29 


6 


90 


3 


87 


3 


88 


7 


83 


8 


69 




2 


40 


3 


03 


3 


70 


5 


14 


3 


10 


3 


88 


4 


93 


4 


90 


Talbot 


3 


12 


3 


64 


4 


70 


4 


98 


2 


02 


2 


35 


3 


79 


4 


43 


Washington 


1 


30 


1 


85 


4 


67 


5 


16 


1 


98 


2 


46 


3 


99 


4 


62 


Wicomico 


2 


36 


3 


10 


3 


90 


4 


69 


1 


99 


2 


45 


3 


80 


4 


08 


Worcester 


2 


31 


2 


31 


4 


19 


4 


78 


2 


24 


2 


84 


4 


72 


5 


42 




















1 


81 


1 


94 


3 


05 


3 


23 





















State Average . . 

Baltimore City . 

County Average 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . 
Frederick. . . . 



See TABLES VI and XIV for basic data. 



TABLE 105 



Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses*: Counties of Maryland: 





All SCHOOI.S 


Elementary Schools 


High Schools 


Year 






















Totalf 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


1923 . . 


$43.00 


$46.22 


$17.07 


$34.84 


$39.84 


$17.08 


$90.79 


$91.12 


$71 .38 


1928. . 


52.62 


55.85 


24.25 


42.91 


47.81 


22.97 


93.51 


95.82 


52.13 


1933 . . 


51.89 


54.37 


25.95 


42.51 


46.82 


24.12 


79.32 


82.35 


44.34 


1938. . 


61.12 


63.20 


35.15 


50.70 


53.41 


30.10 


87.59 


90.87 


58.54 


1939 . . 


61.84 


63.43 


38.83 


51.04 


53.50 


32.91 


87.00 


89.94 


65.68 


1940. . 


64.81 


66.21 


42.11 


53.88 


56.07 


35.77 


88.48 


91.45 


64.32 


1941. . 


66.46 


67.74 


45.32 


55.29 


56.95 


38.69 


90.69 


93.49 


68.45 


1942 . . 


70.36 


70.86 


52.11 


58.73 


58.75 


43.40 


95.69 


97.86 


78.57 


1943 . 


71.16 


72.48 


56.54 


60.39 


60.70 


48.34 


100.46 


102.57 


84.23 


1944°. 


81.77 


82.62 


66.04 


69.04 


71.16 


58.43 


116.06 


118.20 


100.45 


1945°. 


86.64 


86.62 


68.30 


72.37 


74.83 


60.23 


120.87 


123.04 


105.18 


1946t. 


98.28 


98.27 


76.97 


80.29 


83.15 


67.46 


124.73 


127.02 


107.44 


1947. . 


114.54 


114.15 


91.43 


92.83 


95.84 


76.69 


145.20 


147.66 


134.92 


1948. . 


157.30 


153.19 


122.59 


124.19 


128.27 


105.62 


194.71 


198.28 


169.78 


1949 . . 


178.43 


163.29 


133.69 


133.08 


136.89 


115.20 


207.84 


211.59 


182.48 



* Estimated expenditures made by county, City, and State health departments for health services are 
excluded. See TABLE XVI. 

t General Control and Fixed Charges are included in the total for all schools but are excluded elsewhere 
in this table. 

t Prior to 1946, pupils in grade 7 or grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were considered elementary 
and not high school pupils. 

° Includes State and county bonus. 

For basic data for 1949, see TABLES VI, XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



161 



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III 



162 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 107 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Elementary Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1949 



County 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Instr 

Super- 
visionf 


aCTIONAL S] 

Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


3RVICE 
Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


... -M 

Capital 


Total State 


$140 


18 


$2 


84 


$102 


94 


$5 


32 


$12 


20 


$6 


51 


$10 


37 


$31.72 


Baltimore City 


148 


35 


3 


42 


117 


46 


4 


10 


16 


47 


5 


46 


1 


44 


2.45 


Total Counties 


136 


89 


2 


61 


97 


09 


5 


80 


10 


49 


6 


93 


13 


97 


43.51 


Allegany 


137 


48 


2 


67 


104 


42 


3 


69 


11 


16 


3 


94 


11 


60 


6.30 


Anne Arundel .... 


122 


93 


2 


34 


82 


07 


5 


89 


10 


67 


9 


56 


12 


40 


14.88 


Baltimore 


118 


63 


1 


74 


87 


80 


5 


47 


8 


43 


5 


60 


9 


59 


54.65 


Calvert 


193 


51 


3 


93 


113 


88 


4 


39 


13 


78 


17 


80 


39 


73 


9.61 


Caroline 


133 


09 


3 


21 


90 


46 


3 


76 


6 


34 


3 


76 


25 


56 


.06 


Carroll 


126 


49 


3 


01 


84 


39 


6 


22 


8 


43 


5 


04 


19 


40 


45.39 


Cecil 


128 


35 


3 


13 


89 


50 


5 


09 


9 


12 


6 


79 


14 


72 


7.18 


Charles 


tU9 


16 


t3 


19 


t89 


47 




97 


+18 


48 


t6 


98 


123 


07 


3.11 


Dorchester 


155 


17 


2 


60 


103 


68 


3 


34 


13 


68 


8 


45 


23 


42 


2.24 


Frederick 


122 


48 


2 


24 


82 


59 


3 


65 


8 


78 


4 


84 


20 


38 


16.10 


Garrett 


148 


04 


2 


59 


96 


85 


8 


40 


7 


60 


7 


21 


25 


39 


2.22 


Harford 


126 


60 


2 


25 


89 


39 


5 


57 


9 


40 


8 


90 


11 


09 


81.45 


Howard 


135 


80 


2 


11 


93 


20 


5 


64 


10 


23 


5 


53 


19 


09 


34.30 


Kent. 


167 


36 


5 


30 


115 


74 


4 


03 


13 


57 


5 


41 


23 


31 


4.87 


Montgomery 


178 


35 


4 


27 


125 


34 


10 


10 


17 


56 


9 


30 


11 


78 


108.01 


Prince George's . . . 


129 


20 


2 


00 


96 


75 


5 


39 


9 


69 


7 


54 


7 


83 


23.20 


Queen Anne's .... 


165 


20 


4 


49 


103 


65 


8 


11 


10 


22 


9 


40 


29 


33 


8.68 


St. Mary's 


U93 


70 


:4 


66 


tl21 


30 


18 


94 


tl9 


47 


tio 


15 


t29 


18 


.60 


Somerset 


135 


63 


3 


82 


93 


12 


5 


65 


8 


39 


3 


75 


20 


90 


.07 


Talbot 


148 


42 


3 


92 


99 


33 


2 


95 


11 


45 


11 


53 


19 


24 


3.45 


Washington 


144 


35 


2 


67 


111 


65 


4 


74 


8 


10 


6 


30 


10 


89 


25.51 


Wicomico 


128 


46 


1 


54 


87 


00 


6 


91 


9 


74 


6 


10 


17 


17 


24.23 


Worcester 


149 


70 


2 


99 


96 


52 


4 


14 


10 


04 


9 


75 


26 


26 


127.48 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges, kindergartens, and estimated expenditures made by county, City 
and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

X Federal expenditures for maintenance and operation and contributions toward other current expenses at Indian 
Head and Patuxent River are included. 
See TABLES VI and XVIII for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



TABLE 108 

Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High 
and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1949 " senior mgn 



County 



Total State . . . 
Baltimore City 
Total Counties 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 



Carroll . . . . 

Cecil 

Charles . . . . 
Dorchester . 
Frederick. . 



Garrett 

Harford. . . . 
Howard. . . . 

Kent 

Montgomery . 



Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 



Washington . 
Wicomico . . 
Worcester . 



Total 
Current 
Expenses 



$227.25 

263.61 

211.59 

195.23 
215.16 
179.18 
232.78 
224.88 

197.94 
224.49 
J239 . 52 
242.60 
196.86 

226.60 
225.36 
234.40 
250.67 
257.67 

202.01 
240.43 
215.70 
249.87 
217.15 

206.25 
221.92 
240.98 



Instructional Service 










Super- 
vision! 


Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 


$4.04 


$170.71 


$11.34 


$18.47 


$9.12 


$13.57 


$139.29 


4.28 


210.56 


9.99 


28.68 


6.79 


3.31 


2.81 


3.94 


153.54 


11.93 


14.07 


10.12 


17.99 


198.07 


3.98 
2.63 
3.57 
1.08 
4.65 


144.98 
151.82 
132.03 
146.08 
160.31 


9.74 
10.61 
12.69 
12.57 
12.59 


15.25 
15.59 
10.42 
13.64 
11.54 


6.48 
14.29 
8.40 
5.04 
10.23 


14.80 
20.22 
12.07 

54.37 
25.56 


7.69 
518.61 
438.16 
519.66 
13 


4.01 
3.02 
t3.93 
4.39 
3.36 


151.74 
161.41 
1168.73 
161.57 
144.89 


11.08 
13.60 
J11.84 
10.44 
10.13 


8.74 
17.66 
117.74 
20.35 
10.93 


5.29 
10.59 
t6.92 
20.47 

5.82 


17.08 
18.21 
t30.36 
25.38 
21.73 


12.44 
14.86 

5.02 
53.19 
36.02 


3.77 
6.14 
3.92 
9.01 
3.86 


150.71 
162.08 
170.32 
188.42 
191.68 


17.65 
14.28 
11.83 
7.71 
17.12 


8.95 
13.57 
15 67 
13.16 
24.04 


10.13 
12.11 
9.31 
8.09 
9.54 


35.39 
17.18 
23.35 
24.28 
11.43 


31.69 
508.57 
130.03 

90.29 
161.45 


3.43 
5.74 
5.63 
6.48 
5.93 


142.71 
158.61 
134.10 
173.96 
151.75 


10.37 
14.02 
9.60 
6.84 
10.73 


13.59 
13.23 
12.13 
13.32 
10.63 


13.50 
10.94 
8.30 
27.10 
12.76 


18.41 
37.89 
45.94 
22.17 
25.35 1 


331.25 
5.35 
2.12 
29.99 
1.45 


4.97 
4.28 


157.95 
156.71 
172.17 


10.79 
10.89 
8.03 


11.41 
12.40 
13.18 


8.75 
15.47 
14.90 


12.38 1 
22.17 fl 
32.70 1 


12.27 
29.93 
2.00 



depart^e7trtr3"^1ci™eTderedTubY^^ expenditure, made by county. City and State health 

T Consists of salaries and travel. 
Heid^SlTncffl.'^'''"'"" maintenance and operation and contributions toward other current expenses at Indian 

See TABLES VI and XIX for basic data. 



164 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 109 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Elementary Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1949 









Instructional Service 






















Total 






























County 


Current 






Salaries of 










Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expe 


nses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 








visiont 


an 


d 
































Teachers 






















Total State 


$131 


15 


$2 


86 


$103 


42 


$3 


87 


$10 


.14 


$4 


.03 


$6 


83 


$27 


78 


Baltimore City 


145 


16 


2 


74 


120 


54 


3 


55 


13 


00 


3 


.82 




51 


16 


36 


Total Counties 


115 


20 


3 


01 


83 


94 


4 


22 


6 


88 


4 


27 


12 


88 


40 


77 


Allegany 


147 


47 






120 


46 


4 


52 


12 


39 


7 


42 


2 


68 






Anne Arundel .... 


110 


43 




77 


87 


64 


3 


54 


7 


82 


4 


82 


4 


84 


50 


.80 


Baltimore 


110 


83 




98 


82 


55 


5 


52 


8 


46 


4 


19 


8 


13 


13 


.63 


Calvert 


93 


57 


4 


33 


77 


18 


1 


42 


2 


48 




97 


7 


19 


99 


66 


Caroline 


115 


92 


3 


71 


80 


36 


4 


47 


4 


27 


1 


64 


21 


47 




06 


Carroll 


98 


59 


1 


20 


68 


87 


3 


32 


6 


30 


3 


26 


15 


64 


263 


53 


Cecil 


123 


79 


3 


45 


72 


75 


6 


72 


10 


86 


7 


30 


22 


71 


3 


33 


Charles 


94 


78 


2 


69 


67 


87 


5 


82 


4 


39 


2 


43 


11 


58 


1 


86 


Dorchester 


123 


61 


4 


24 


85 


07 


2 


59 


4 


86 


4 


31 


22 


54 






Frederick 


104 


22 


2 


37 


70 


89 


4 


23 


7 


07 


2 


29 


17 


37 


58 


22 


Garrett 


































Harford 


130 


04 


2 


52 


94 


94 


5 


74 


9 


is 


7 


59 


10 


07 


17 


58 


Howard 


109 


99 


4 


44 


77 


35 


3 


04 


4 


58 


5 


58 


15 


00 




84 


Kent 


135 


39 


4 


90 


87 


17 


4 


22 


7 


07 


5 


67 


26 


36 


3 


78 


Montgomery 


153 


30 


4 


41 


105 


80 


5 


83 


12 


24 


6 


07 


18 


95 


42 


09 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


117 


53 


2 


00 


90 


34 


4 


57 


8 


07 


4 


23 


8 


32 


44 


43 


149 


53 


4 


58 


101 


51 


6 


88 


4 


76 


10 


46 


21 


34 




11 


St. Mary's 


123 


33 


6 


22 


86 


99 


4 


11 


2 


36 


2 


82 


20 


83 






Somerset 


95 


06 


2 


40 


67 


54 


1 


72 


4 


44 


3 


08 


15 


88 


i 


is 


Talbot 


113 


12 


3 


42 


78 


46 


2 


56 


5 


24 


3 


79 


19 


65 


147 


38 


Washington 


130 


53 






88 


47 


2 


80 


14 


95 


7 


25 


17 


06 


1,018 


.98 


Wicomico 


113 


33 


4 


24 


81 


67 


4 


15 


5 


41 


3 


21 


14 


65 




54 


Worcester 


103 


04 


4 


60 


68 


88 


2 


90 


4 


59 


4 


38 


17 


69 




19 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges, and estimated expenditures made by county, City and State health 
departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 
See TABLES VI and XX for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



165 



TABLE 110 

Cost* per P"Pi» Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior 
High and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1949 



County 



Total State . 



Baltimore City . 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . 

Calvert 

Caroline. . . 



Carroll . . 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . 
Frederick. . 



Garrett 

Harford. . . . 
Howard .... 

Kent 

Montgomery . 



Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset. . . . 
Talbot 



Washington . 
Wicomico . . 
Worcester . , 



Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Instructional Service 










Super- 
visionf 


Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 

Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 


. $192.29 


$2.73 


$146.16 


$8.44 


$15.34 


$5.73 


$13.89 


$153.83 


201.49 


2.40 


163.84 


8.18 


18.98 


5.35 


2.74 


20.07 


182.48 


3.08 


127.31 


8.74 


11.46 


6.13 


25.76 


296.41 


280.24 
175.82 
180.00 
192.12 
180.01 


8!62 
1.30 
3.41 


213.37 
125.79 
124.80 
113.22 
117.63 


12.24 
11.10 
12.73 
7.35 
9.18 


25.20 
10.41 
17.27 
8.09 
7.47 


13.15 
2.23 
5.87 
4.25 

13.69 


16.28 
26.29 
11.31 
57,91 
28.63 


718^12 
84.02 
4.30 
294 . 62 


228.67 
229.55 
170.73 
173.67 
170.75 


3.00 
1.50 

5^62 


174 . 62 
141.36 
123.31 
123 . 53 
130.64 


13.22 
15.16 
9.06 
4.30 
6.82 


8.55 
23.93 
10.71 
10.65 

7.19 


3.79 
11.50 

2.46 
10.45 

4.13 


25.49 
36.10 
25.19 
24.74 
16.35 


648 . 62 
26.82 

3.90 
24.44 

6.82 


172^43 
168.14 
182.79 
227.51 


4^32 
4.91 

4^29 


125 ;i3 
103.73 
125.24 
154.81 


8^22 
8.51 
7 .07 
13.07 


9.76 
10.84 

7.66 
20.44 


11^39 
3.85 
3.91 
7.37 


13; 61 
38.30 
38.91 
27.53 


36^88 
1,288.53 
86.92 
149.52 


173 . 63 
199 . 57 
201.50 
137.33 
175.67 


6.95 
5.73 
7.95 


114.83 
134.46 
136.14 
108.06 
137.74 


7.29 
7.95 
7.89 
2.62 
7.27 


8.63 
8.21 
12.91 
6.88 
5.34 


7.22 
3.69 
7.96 
3.75 
4.15 


28.71 
39.53 
28.65 
16.02 
21.17 


385.74 
4.85 
.42 
2.13 
35 


297.76 
183.70 
148.20 




211.17 
136.96 
105.48 


13.46 
7.11 
4.69 


31.94 
9.46 
9.11 


15.48 
5.32 
5.43 


25.71 
24.85 
23.49 


1,020.45 
2.92 
.98 



de^aS'S^^r'lT^lcS^S.e^ expenditures made by county. CUy and State health. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XXI for basic data. 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



1 



1 


1 li|2SBgSS|SSB=||§SSS|SS 


1 




1 ^ 








1l 




= i 




S 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 


1 ilpsSP5!l||Si|issi|5S 


1 




1 








1 




i 


i |||isi!si|ii,iii|.giis||i 




Total 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel .... 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

W' orcester 



1 

1 

I 

I 

.B 

1 

§ 
I 

1 

i 

ill 

i 
III 
■1 



Maryland State Department of Education 



167 





1 






1 


1 iiiiilii iiiiiiliii 


r 


1 


i liiiiiiii iiiiiiliii 


J 

g 


1 


Iiiiilii iiiiiiliii 


1 


1 


$346,335 

8,997 
44,390 
t23,199 

9,631 
12,210 

7.229 

8,900 
20,038 
17,863 
10.649 

1 13.823 
18,541 
1 10,695 
tl7,834 
t3 1,080 
8,498 
11,961 
18,949 
15,108 
6.024 
25,656 
15,060 


1 


1 


j iiiiiiliii 




1 


1 SI :isi5lll 1 lilillll 




2 


376.0 

36.0 
33.0 
14.0 
11.0 
7.0 
10.0 
20.0 
16.0 
11.0 

15^0 
10.0 
11.0 
26.0 
51.0 
10.0 
11.0 
19.0 
15.0 
7.0 
18.0 
19.0 




00 

2 


338.7 

6.1 
33.0 
29.1 
8.0 
9.0 
6.8 
9.0 
20.0 
15.0 
10.5 

15.0 
8.5 
11.0 
24.0 
40.7 
10.0 
9.8 
18.7 
14.5 
6.0 
18.0 
16.0 


1 


2 


298.8 

6.1 
31.0 
23.3 
8.0 
8.0 
5.9 
7.0 
18.0 
13.9 
10.5 

13^3 
7.0 
7.0 
19.2 
35.5 
7.0 
9.0 
17.6 
13.5 
6.0 
16.0 
16.0 




CO 

2 


260.9 

6.1 
27.4 
19.5 
8.0 
8.0 
5.2 
6.4 
15.9 
13,2 
8.1 

11.0 
6.7 
6.0 
17.0 
24.3 
6.2 
7.8 
16.0 
12.0 
5.7 
16.4 
14.0 


1 


2 


CC -a^Tr^OiOOOOOT*. ■'J.OOCMOOcOOt-OOcncO 


1 ^;S::'«t-'ro205cD t^iocooi^'Ococ^ccjocs 


o 
2 


162.7 

4.0 

13.0 
2.9 
6.0 
7.3 
4.1 
4.0 
12.0 
10.0 
7.0 

5^9 
2.0 
5.0 
7.0 

17.0 
6.0 
8.0 
9.0 
8.0 
. 2.7 

13.5 
9.0 


=— 


2 


102.0 

3.8 
9.0 

2^0 
7.0 
3.0 
3.0 
5.0 
6.0 
3.5 

4.1 

4^2 
4.0 

12.4 
3.0 
2.0 
7.0 
5.8 
2.4 

10.8 
4.0 




2 






00 

2 




o 


2 




i 

J 


CD 

2 






2 






o 

i 






i 




D 
p 


5 iliiiijjiilij 



1 

1 

-§ 

CO 

I 
1 

1 
s 

i 

f 



1 

il 



iJi 

Hi 

■iiiy 



il! 



168 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 113 



Federal Vocational Funds Allotted to and Expended in Maryland: 1948-49 



Type op 
Vocational Program 


1949 
AUottment 


1949 
Expenditures 


Balance 
June 30, 1949 


Total 


$316,144.44 

80,100.00 
111,884.90 
57,333.74 
49,862.38 
16,963.42 


$312,924.99 

80,034.36 
108,731.09 
57,333.74 
49,862.38 
16,963.42 


$3,219.45 

65.64 
3,153.81 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Teacher Training and Supervision 








# 





TABLE 114 

Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland; 



1948-49 



Type op 
Vocational Program 


All 
Subjects 


Agri- 
culture 


Industrial 
Education 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


Total Expended in Maryland 

Instruction in Counties 

Day Schools— White 


$312,924.99 

106,319.43 
27,193.10 
50,579.51 
4,135.50 

32,518.61 
10,050.93 

3,736.60 
931.59 
15,897.24 

2,912.50 

2,340.87 
6,446.73 
22,892.53 

•26,969.85 


$92,295.19 

53,541.83 
20,159.03 
5,976.00 
357.50 


$129,610.14 

26,073.00 
325.00 

23,860.01 
465.00 

32,518.61 
9,088.50 
1,974.38 
402.74 
5,236.25 


$68,790.35 

24,844.60 
6,709.07 

20,743.50 
3,313.00 


$22,229.31 
1,860.00 


Evening Schools — White 




Colored 




Instruction in Baltimore City 

Day Schools — White 




Colored 






962.43 
567.50 


Evening Schools — White 

Colored 




1,194.72 

528.85 


Cooperative and Continuation 

Supervision 




10,660.99 
2,912.50 


Instruction by the University of Md. 
Mining 




2,340.87 
6,446.73 
12,527.22 

8,351.83 




Volunteer Firemen 








Teacher Training 

State Supervision and Guidance 


5,367.84 
6,892.99 


4,113.74 
7,342.87 


883.73 
4,382.16 



Maryland State Department of Education 169 



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170 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



TABLE 117 



Expenditures for Adult Education in Maryland Counties: 1948-49 



County 


Expenditures for Salaries* 


Per Cent of 
Salaries 


Expendi- 
tures for 
Purposes 
Other than 
Salaries 


Receipts 
from 
Fees 


Total 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Fed- 
eral 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Total Counties 


$108,298.77 


$50,704.00 


$38,276.01 


$19,318.76 


46.9 


35.3 


17.8 


$5,572.09 


$15,555.71 





WHITE 





$ 97,283.76 

20,552.50 
1,689.50 
19,031.00 


$ 46,036.50 

13,455.50 
1,541.50 
7,487.50 


$ 33,149.50 

2,279.50 
148.00 
4,922.50 


$ 18,097.76 
4,817.50 
6,621. 00 


47.3 

65.5 
91.2 
39.3 

13.5 
38.1 

37.0 
70,8 
100.0 
23.2 
53.4 
18.7 
48.6 
18.7 

56^0 

52.2 
76.9 
20.0 
71.1 


34.1 

11.1 

8.8 
25.9 

86^5 
51.8 

59.5 
29.2 

76^8 
37.5 
81.3 
24.5 
81.3 

50.0 

47.8 
18.3 
80.0 
28.9 


18.6 
23.4 
34^8 

10.1 

100^0 
3.5 

9^1 
26^9 

4.8 


$ 5,292.80 
1,329.14 


$ 14,485.71 
3,200.94 




Anne Arundel 


Baltimore 




4,682.00 


Calvert 




Caroline 


652.50 
1,983.50 


88.00 
755.00 


564.50 
1,028.50 


154.00 
43.00 


188.00 
216.00 


Carroll 


200.00 

' 55.00 
77.50 


Cecil 


Charles 


55.00 
2,185.50 
1,198.00 
256.50 
12,731.73 
239.76 
707.00 
22,456.50 
4,661.77 










Dorchester 


807.50 
848.00 
256.50 
2,959.00 
128.00 
132.00 
10,907.00 
872.50 

600.00 


1,300.50 
350.00 


65.52 




Frederick 


26.00 


Garrett 






Harford 


9,772.73 
90.00 
575.00 
5,502.00 
3,788.77 




195.36 


680.77 


Howard 


21.76 


Kent 


93.58 
1,744.30 
1,446.21 


146.00 
3,804.00 
1,428.00 


Montgomery 


6,047.50 
.50 


Prince George's .... 
Queen Anne's 


St. Mary's 


1,200.00 


600.00 






Somerset 








Talbot 


1,286.50 
5,400.00 
659.00 
337.50 


672.00 
4,154.50 
132.00 
240.00 


614.50 
988.50 
527.00 
97.50 


50.62 
165.07 
6.00 


Washington 


257.00 




Wicomico 


114.00 


Worcester 












COLORED 


All Counties 


$11,015.01 


$4,667.50 


$5,126.51 


$1,221.00 


42.4 

43.2 
32.7 

72.4 

69^8 

100.0 
49.9 

13^7 


46.5 

56.8 
32.6 

100.0 

100.0 

27.6 

30.2 

50^1 

86.3 
100.0 


11.1 
34.7 

100.0 


$279.29 


$1,070.00 


Allegany 


Anne Arundel 


2,077.50 
3,392.00 


897.00 
1,110.00 


1,180.50 
1,106.00 






Baltimore 


1,176.00 
' 45.00 




764.00 


Calvert 




Caroline 


71.50 




71.50 




17.00 


Carroll 






Cecil 


148.00 
45.00 
660.50 




148.00 






Charles 








Dorchester 


478.00 


182.50 






Frederick 








Garrett 












Harford 


1,899.00 


1,325.50 


573.50 


29.19 


17.00 


Howard 




Kent 


220.00 
1,211.00 


220.00 
604.00 




29.07 
112.50 


■ 32.00 
108.00 


Montgomery 


607.00 




Prince George's. . . . 
Queen Anne's 














St. Mary's 












Somerset 












Talbot 


241.00 


33.00 


208.00 


18.63 




Washington 






Wicomico 


1,049.51 




1,049.51 


89.90 


132.00 


Worcester 















Exclude reimbursement of supervisors' and nonteaching principals' salaries and travel expenses. 



172 Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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175 



TABLE 122 

Expenditures of Public Funds for Pupil Transportation per Maryland Pupil 
Transported, Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Average Expenditure 



County 


All Schools 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total State 


$27 


54 


$26 


85 


$28 


61 


$27 


02 


$26 


44 


$27 


94 


$30 


30 


$29 


12 


$32 


06 


Baltimore City . . 


60 


57 


56 


70 


380 


71 


59 


22 


54 


38 


380 


71 


66 


19 


66 


19 






Total Counties . . 


27 


35 


26 


57 


28 


55 


26 


84 


26 


19 


27 


87 


30 


05 


28 


68 


32 


06 


Allegany 


27 


72 


25 


65 


30 


30 


27 


59 


25 


66 


29 


99 


61 


96 


12 


27 


71 


43 


Anne Arundel . 


23 


20 


20 


76 


26 


60 


21 


90 


20 


34 


24 


22 


31 


61 


24 


09 


38 


50 


Baltimore 


18 


27 


19 


61 


15 


84 


17 


71 


19 


04 


15 


34 


26 


78 


27 


23 


25 


62 


Calvert 


43 


36 


34 


93 


55 


32 


49 


27 


46 


54 


53 


45 


34 


81 


16 


83 


57 


76 


Caroline 


37 


41 


39 


17 


34 


83 


39 


31 


40 


54 


37 


44 


32 


25 


35 


26 


28 


09 


Carroll 


24 


86 


25 


96 


22 


97 


24 


68 


25 


98 


22 


45 


28 


27 


25 


60 


33 


58 


Cfcil 


29 


01 


28 


05 


30 


42 


27 


28 


26 


51 


28 


47 


43 


58 


44 


13 


43 


04 


Charles 


2'( 


33 


24 


97 


31 


78 


32 


07 


29 


37 


36 


60 


20 


10 


19 


31 


23 


74 


Dorchester .... 


46 


99 


48 


73 


44 


16 


49 


76 


50 


48 


48 


67 


41 


82 


45 


73 


34 


37 


Frederick 


33 


24 


33 


50 


32 


79 


33 


08 


33 


05 


33 


12 


35 


24 


38 


70 


28 


17 


Garrett 


43 


57 


44 


71 


41 


47 


43 


57 


44 


71 
36 


41 


47 














Harford 


21 


49 


20 


15 


23 


63 


21 


91 


20 


24 


46 


18 


87 


18 


68 


19 


13 


Howard 


25 


78 


25 


11 


26 


78 


24 


67 


24 


92 


24 


29 


30 


60 


26 


00 


36 


48 


Kent 


36 


85 


36 


15 


37 


97 


35 


73 


36 


06 


35 


21 


38 


89 


36 


33 


42 


89 


Montgomery . . 


20 


86 


20 


21 


22 


17 


19 


59 


18 


81 


21 


17 


28 


60 


29 


16 


27 


63 


Prince George's 


25 


34 


20 


43 


30 


76 


25 


20 


19 


91 


31 


42 


25 


85 


22 


71 


28 


59 


Queen Anne's . 


41 


89 


41 


38 


42 


60 


41 


85 


40 


71 


43 


48 


42 


04 


43 


72 


40 


16 


St. Mary's 


41 


86 


44 


50 


38 


91 


45 


45 


48 


17 


42 


82 


34 


55 


38 


41 


28 


65 


Somerset 


31 


16 


32 


25 


29 


40 


36 


19 


36 


80 


35 


25 


24 


45 


26 


38 


21 


21 


Talbot 


33 


53 


32 


68 


34 


82 


38 


29 


37 


88 


38 


79 


26 


67 


26 


76 


26 


47 


Washington . . . 


24 


67 


25 


63 


23 


54 


23 


82 


24 


86 


22 


59 


109 


50 


105 


44 


113 


88 


Wicomico 


38 


54 


38 


32 


39 


00 


40 


55 


39 


57 


42 


83 


33 


71 


34 


84 


31 


98 


Worcester 


39 


27 


37 


80 


41 


56 


45 


79 


44 


17 


48 


28 


28 


87 


27 


93 


30 


39 



N.B.— Underlying data will be found in TABLES 120 and 121. 



176 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 123— Number of Maryland Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided 
at Public Expense, and Number of Buses Used, Year Ending June 30, 1949 



County 


Number of 


Different Schools 


Number of Vehicles 


Total 


Schools for White Pupils 


Schools 

for 
Colored 
Pupils 


Buses Owned by 


Private 
Cars 

Station 
W^agons 


With 
Ele- 
mentary 
Grades 
Only 


With 
High and 

Ele- 
mentary 
Grades 


With 
High 
School 
Only 


County 


Con- 
tractors 


Total State 


*665 


316 


90 


66 


*193 


197 


t998 


88 


Baltimore City . . . 


9 


5 - 




2 


2 




tl4 




Total Counties . . . 


*656 


311 


90 


64 


*191 


197 


t984 


88 


Allegany 


34 


22 


7 


4 


1 




t84 


9 


Anne Arundel . . 


*45 


26 


1 


7 


^11 




74 


1 


Baltimore 


54 


27 


9 


4 


14 


30 


t96 


1 


Calvert 


13 


5 




1 


7 


2 


25 


1 


Caroline 


13 


4 


5 




4 




37 




Carroll 


20 


8 


8 


1 


3 


4 


49 


3 


Cecil 


22 


10 


4 


4 


4 




37 


4 


Charles 


26 


2 


4 


2 


18 




35 


4 


Dorchester .... 


31 


13 


6 


1 


11 




46 


4 


Frederick 


33 


18 


5 


3 


7 


5 


79 




Garrett 


29 


24 


4 


1 




3 


55 


21 


Harford 


27 


10 


6 


2 


9 


16 


28 




Howard 


16 


6 


3 


1 


6 




27 




Kent 


17 


7 


2 


2 


6 




26 


1 


Montgomery . . 


58 


31 


3 


9 


15 


81 






Prince George's 


*57 


21 


6 


8 


*22 


38 


34 




Queen Anne's . . 


24 


11 




3 


10 




27 


21 


St. Mary's .... 


25 


14 




2 


9 




25 


10 


Somerset 


18 


5 


2 


2 


9 




36 




Talbot 


19 


7 


1 


2 


9 


2 


27 


3 


Washington . . 


38 


27 


6 


4 


1 


16 


43 


2 


Wicomico 


18 


7 


4 


1 


6 




49 


1 


Worcester 


19 


6 


4 




9 




45 


2 



* Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there, 
t Includes common carrier lines: 18 in Allegany, 44 in Baltimore, and 14 in Baltimore City. 



Maryland 



State Department of Education 



177 



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178 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 125 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation as of 

June 30, 1949 ^ 







1949 Assessed 


Assessed Valua- 


r^er <_»eni. ocnooi 




ocnool xjoncls 


Valuation Tax- 


tion per Dollar of 


Bonded Indebted- 




Outstanding 


able at Full Rate 


School Bonded 


ness Is of As- 


County 


June 6yj, 1349 


for County 


Indebtedness 


sessed Valuation 






Purposes 










ii'70 AOQ onn 
$0,0 (o,U<io,oUU 


$52 


1 o 




*17,905,165.91 


tl,702,786,319 


95 


1.1 


Total Counties 


62,066,479.02 


1,970,241,981 


38 


2.6 


Allegany 


4,236,000.00 


131,956,300 


31 


3.2 




*4,076,005.10 


tlll,229,819 


27 


3.7 


Baltimore 


12,390,000.01 


t443,806,416 


36 


2.8 


Calvert 


665,000.00 


9,874,199 


15 


6.7 


Caroline 


71,000.00 


20,263,120 


285 


0.3 


Carroll 


1,500,000.00 


60,935,053 


41 


2.5 


Cecil 


145,000.00 


t61,410,230 


423 


0.2 


Charles 


834,000.00 


tl8,699,688 


22 


4.5 


Dorchester 


265,060,00 


34,425,845 


130 


0.8 


Frederick 


726,000.00 


88,610,080 


122 


0.8 


Garrett 


1,500,000.00 


23,780,917 


16 


6.3 


Harford 


4,112,500.00 


t85,283,626 


21 


4.8 


Howard 


707,000.00 


27,018,099 


38 


2.6 


Kent 


954,000.00 


20,948,004 


22 


4.5 


Montgomery 


10,540,431.60 


t324,594,430 


31 


3.2 


Prince George's 


*6,813,982.31 


1196,912,505 


27 


3.5 


Queen Anne's 


108,000.00 


22,659,935 


210 


0.5 


St. Mary's 




17,358,190 






Somerset 


36,000.00 


17,750,003 


493 


6.2 


Talbot 


73,000.00 


30,560,890 


419 


0.2 


Washington 


580,500.00 


128,320,444 


221 


0.6 




1,673,000.00 


58,593,290 


35 


2.9 


Worcester 


60,000.00 


35,250,898 


587 


0.2 



* Sinking fund balances have been deducted as follows: Baltimore City $2,042,834.09; Anne Arundel 
$139,994.90; Prince George's $267,017.69. 

t Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority property. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



179 



TABLE 126 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness and Interest Payments per Pupil 

Belonging: 1948-49 



School 






Bonded 


Interest 




Indebted- 
ness 


Payments 


OOUN i I 


$228.29 


$5.69 


Garrett 

Harford 


162.82 


4.49 


Kent 


264.91 


6.37 


Montgomery 


281.10 


5.02 


Prince George's 


260.30 


12.92 


375.42 


7.69 


St. Mary's 


268.27 


7.30 


Somerset 


22.17 


0.85 


Talbot 


163.99 






28.90 


0.89 


Wicomico 


190.75 


5.99 


Worcester 


61.11 


1.76 




79.82 


3.19 





County 



State Average . . 

Baltimore City . 

County Average 

Allegany. ... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick. . . . 



School 
Bonded 
Indebted- 



$327 


55 




542 


67 


$10.69 


190 


55 


3.29 


419 


01 


10.54 


500 


21 


12.45 


279 


76 


7.82 


43 


77 


0.87 


10 


47 


0^45 


23 


60 


1.03 


44 


37 


1.42 


297 


01 


5.75 


15 


96 


0.85 



TABLE 127 
Value of Maryland School Property, 1923-1949 



Year 


Value 


OF School Property* 


Value per Pupil Enrolled 
















Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


Cityt 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 


1923 


$22,236,638 


$10,440,008 


$11,796,630 


$87 


$100 


$77 


1928 


51,765,517 


32,770,847 


18,994,670 


191 


291 


120 


1933 


66,030,676 


40,679,936 


25,350,740 


225 


335 


147 


1938 


81,336,202 


49,633,230 


t31,702,972 


277 


410 


184 


1939 


82,477,467 


49,676,141 


t32,801,326 


278 


408 


188 


1940 


86,373,506 


49,768,110 


t36,605,396 


291 


412 


208 


1941 


87,253,746 


49,827,220 


t37,426,526 


292 


414 


210 


1942 


88,171,154 


49,728,358 


t38,442,796 


296 


421 


213 


1943 


89,953,989 


50,463,694 


t39,490,295 


300 


430 


217 


1944 


89,951,808 


50,127,722 


t39,824,086 


304 


427 


223 


1945 


89,660,481 


49,726,430 


t39,934,051 


303 


437 


219 


1946 


94,935,593 


49,726,430 


t45,209,163 


320 


442 


245 


1947 


96,879,433 


49,800,279 


t47,079,154 


322 


440 


251 


1948 


104,461,410 


50,639,234 


t53,822,176 


338 


437 


278 


1949 


120,474,231 


50,258,400 


t70,215,831 


373 


428 


342 



* Excludes administration buildings, warehouses, storage buildings, and school buildings under con- 
struction or no longer in use. 

t Value of equipment has been excluded from Baltimore City but included in the counties. 



180 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 128 



Value of Maryland School Property* per Pupil Belonging: June 30, 1949 



County 


All Schools 


Schools for White 
Pupils 


Schools for Colored 
Pupils 


Total 


per Pupil 


Value 


Average 
per r^upu 


.A , 
Value 


AvBrsge 
per Pupil 


Total State 


$120,474,231 


$406.25 


$105,346,333 


$456.36 


$15,127,898 


$230.20 


Baltimore City .... 


t50,258,400 


492.13 


t42,356,951 


628.15 


t7,901,449 


227.75 


Total Counties .... 


70,215,831 


361.13 


62,989,382 


385.47 


7,226,449 


232.95 


Allegany 


5,529,095 


366.91 


5,442,502 


367.50 


86,593 


332.92 


Anne Arundel . . . 


5,439,680 


347.39 


4,157,600 


353.27 


1,282,080 


329.57 


Baltimore 


12,756,615 


381.63 


11,293,487 


391.81 


1,463,128 


423.41 


Calvert 


327,686 


132.19 


264,956 


224.79 


62,730 


48.25 


Caroline 


721,825 


225.35 


648,050 


267.88 


73,775 


94.11 


Carroll 


2,453,268 


366.35 


2,235,868 


354.26 


217,400 


564.23 


Cecil 


1,405,715 


280.16 


1,344,475 


296.12 


61,240 


128.33 


Charles 


tl,852,340 


423.67 


$1,285,750 


542.42 


566,590 


283.05 


Dorchester 


1,329,301 


306.47 


1,205,788 


408.87 


123,513 


88.96 


Frederick 


2,134,610 


234.70 


1,983,590 


240.32 


151,020 


179.53 


Garrett 


616,488 


134.62 


616,488 


134.62 






Harford 


$1,164,350 


153.64 


$1,099,000 


167.82 


65,350 


63.48 


Howard 


825,500 


222.49 


787,600 


270.06 


37,900 


47.74 


Kent 


472,050 


207.33 


417,050 


267.63 


55,000 


76.55 


Montgomery . . . 


11,375,032 


595.81 


10,954,385 


645.49 


420,647 


198.31 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


9,526,921 


391.14 


8,198,120 


410.33 


1,328,801 


303.55 


1,162,100 


471.02 


1,035,550 


582.06 


126,550 


183.92 


St. Mary's 


$322,005 


127.86 


$293,380 


182.53 


28,625 


31.42 


Somerset 


1,163,233 


338.44 


1,046,333 


511.75 


116,900 


83.95 


Talbot 


680,277 


219.91 


525,936 


256.14 


154,341 


148.38 


Washington 


5,178,980 


397.03 


4,695,980 


368.63 


483,000 


1,581.53 


Wicomico 


2,981,060 


529.24 


2,752,894 


664.03 


228,166 


153.44 


Worcester 


797,700 


212.14 


704,600 


295.22 


93,100 


67.78 



* Excludes administration buildings, teacherages, janitors' homes, warehouses, storage buildings, re- 
pair shops, and buildings under construction or no longer in use. 
t Value of equipment has been excluded. 

$ Value of school properties owned by the Federal Government has been excluded. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



181 



TABLE 129 



Tax Levies and Appropriations Made by Maryland Counties and Baltimore City, 1949-50 



County 


Total Levied 
by the Counties 
and Baltimore 
Cit^ 


Appropriations for Public Schools 


Appropriation 
for 
Libraries 


Total for 
Schools 


Current 
Expenses 


Debt 
Service 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$110,778,702.42 


$43,798,746.00 


$37,312,996.74 


$5,117,382.92 


$1,368,366.34 


$1,537,012.74 


Baltimore City* 


68,500,145.09 


20,951,947.70 


119,364,088.70 


1,587,859.00 




1,229,507.00 


Total Counties . . 


42,278,557.33 


22,846,798.30 


17,948,908.04 


3,529,523.92 


1,368,366.34 


307,505.74 


Allegany 


t2,700,101.37 


1,596,068.46 


+1,163,207.96 


372,860.50 


60,000.00 




Anne Arundel* 


t3,267,232.89 


1,483,705.61 


1,151,623.81 


286,001.80 


46,080.00 


23,068.20 


Baltimore*. . . . 


tll,289,499.91 


5,283,123.69 


+4,307,826.19 


731,964.40 


243,333.10 


85,413.20 


Calvert 


224,529.53 


149,691.66 


76,766.66 


68,925.00 


4,000.00 




Caroline 


316,274.00 


166,816.00 


^46,811.00 


9,505.00 


10,500.00 




Carroll* 


959,986.11 


563,785.22 


480,930.34 


X 


82,854.88 




Cecil 


831,998.06 


560,592.90 


510,920.04 


18,987.50 


30,685.36 


11,600.00 


Charles 


345,928.24 


159,909.00 


144,538.50 


7,897.50 


7,473.00 


1,166.67 


Dorchester*. . . 


660,131.30 


299,466.75 


1258,732.00 


40,734.75 




1,500.00 


Frederick* .... 


1,573,935.23 


975,338.84 


+660,898.69 


114,440.15 


200,000.00 


5,000.00 


Garrett* 


t642,368.60 


230,191.74 


+163,781.54 


56,407.20 


10,003.00 


5,744.01 


Harford* 


1,412,872.55 


758,488.13 


t652,775.65 


14,475.00 


91,237.48 


17,543.84 


Howard* 


640,738.17 


316,180.60 


249,392.20 


57,752.40 


9,036.00 


5,519.81 


Kent* 


663,417.52 


264,835.00 


^185,750.00 


74,435.00 


4,650.00 




Montgomery . . 


7,90'i, 574.00 


4,466,635.00 


3,592,401.00 


874,234.00 




°62,115.00 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's*. 


3,842,675.51 


' 2,552,961.97 


^1,791,975. 00 


534,661.97 


226,325.00 


39,021.92 


358,167.56 


212,225.60 


175,298.60 


11,950.00 


24,977.00 


5,600.00 


St. Mary's 


225,408.12 


i 123,947.45 


115,428.64 




8,518.81 


2,333.09 


Somerset 


1321,978.36 


1 139,037.91 


1121,916.28 


7,500.00 


9,621.63 


900.00 


Talbot 


405,373.90 


236,040.00 


204,400.00 


16,640.00 


15,000.00 


5,800.00 


Washington* . . 


1.968,549.93 


1,319,322.73 


:i,086,600.00 


98,223.00 


134,499.73 


23,640.00 


Wicomico 


1,124,099.38 


626,547.00 


439,312.00 


129,635.00 


57,600.00 


11,540.00 


Worcester 


595,717.09 


361,887.04 


267,621.94 


2,293.75 


91,971.35 



















* Counties operate on calendar vear. 

t State funds e.xcluded: Allegany $225,000; Anne Arundel $220,000; Baltimore $460,000; Garrett $10,615; 
Somerset $2,190. 

X Local funds for the retirement of teachers are included as follows: Baltimore City $549,475; Allegany $15,000; 
Baltimore $3,232.92; Caroline $3,060; Dorchester $360; Frederick $11,879.70; Garrett $3,540; Harford $3,329.; 
Kent $2,800; Prince George's $33,000; Somerset $4,916.28; Washington $60,000; Worcester $2,364.98. 

z Paid out of surplus. 

° Local levy for Bethesda and Silver Spring. 



182 Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



183 



CHART 5 

Per Cent of Total Tax Levies" Appropriated for Public Schools: 
Counties and Incorporated Places in Maryland: 1949-50 (1949*) 



County 



Total 



Current 
Expenses 



20 



Debt Service and 



Capital Outlay 



Total State 
Baltimore City 
Total Counties 
Cecil 

St. Mary's 

Washington 

Queen Anne ' s 

Carroll 

Harford 

Charles 

Talbot 

Caroline 

Hovfard 

Baltimore 

Prince George ' s 

Frederick 

Montgomery 

Anne Arundel 

Dorchester 

Calvert 

Somerset 

Allegany 

Worcester 

Kent 

Wicomico 
Garrett 



56.8 

50.6 

A5.I 

62.0 
52.9 
56.2 
5^.8 
50.9 
47.0 

46.0 
44.5 
49.5 
46.8 
55.1 
49.7 
41.2 

41.5 
56.4 
61.0 

58.8 
57.2 
57.7 
57.1 
52.4 




33.1-^^1': 






1 32.1 ■ 


9.2 



□4.9 




* Calendar year 1949. 



184 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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186 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 133 



Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 1948-49 





Total Basis Assessable at 






County 


Full Rate for County 


Number of 


Wealth 




Purposes (in Thousands) 


Pupils Belonging 


per Pupil 


State Total and Average 


$3,705,778 


306,598 


$12,087 


Baltimore City 


1,718,132 


110,055 


15,611 


County Total and Average 


1,987,646 


196,543 


10,113 


Allegany 


131,956 


15,069 


8,757 


Anne Arundel 


111,349 


15,659 


7,152 


Baltimore 


448,614 


33,003 


13,593 


Calvert 


9,874 


2,479 


3,983 


Caroline 


20,263 


3,203 


6,326 


Carroll 


60,935 


6,697 


9,099 


Cecil 


61,985 


5,017 


12,355 


Charles 


19,359 


4,372 


4,428 


Dorchester 


34,426 


4,337 


7,938 


Frederick 


88,610 


9,095 


9,743 


Garrett 


23,781 


4,579 


5,193 


Harford 


89,137 


7,578 


11,763 


Howard 


27,018 


3,710 


7,282 


Kent 


20,948 


2,277 


9,200 




325,958 


21,072 


15,469 


Prince George's 


203,908 


24,357 


8,372 


Queen Anne's 


22,660 


2,467 


9,185 


St. Mary's. 


16,389 


2,565 


6,389 


Somerset 


17,750 


3,437 


5,164 


Talbot 


30,561 


3,094 


9,877 


Washington 


128,321 


13,083 


9,808 


Wicomico 


58,593 


5,633 


10,402 




35,251 


3,760 


9,375 



Maryland State Department of Education 



187 



CHART 6 

Sate Individual Income Tax per Capita: Counties of Maryland 
and Baltimore City: 1948-49 



County 



Per capita incone tax 
2 4 6 8 10 12 14 
I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 



Total State 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties 

Montgomery 

Baltiraore 

Talbot 

Queen Anne ' e 

Vi'ashington 

V.'icoaico 

Hov.'ard 

Allegany 

Prince George's 

Karf ord 

Anne Arundel 

Frederick 

Worcester 

Cecil 

Dorchester 

Carroll 

Kent 

Caroline 

Somerset 

Charles 

Calvert 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 




Sources: Report of the Comptroller of the Treasury of Maryland, Fiscal Year 1949, page 91; 
population estimates from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health. 



188 



Eighty-Third Annual R,eport 



CHARTS 7 and 8 

Per Capita Income Payments in Sixteen States, Including Maryland: 1948-49 
and Per Capita Income Payments in Maryland: 1929-1949 



Per capita income payments (in hundreds of dollars) 

2 4 6 8 10 12 lA 16 16 
I — ' — \ — I — 1 — I — I — f — I — I — 1 — I — I — I — I — ' — I — I — I 



1 


New York 




2 


Nevada 




5 


Delaware 




4 


California 




5 


Illinois 




6 


Connecticut 




7 


New Jersey 


■QEQ3 


8 


Wyoming 




9 


Washington 




10 


Oregon 




11 


Michigan 


■Esa 


12 


Ohio 




1? 


Massachusetts 




14 


Pennsylvania 


■KIB 


15 


Rhode Island 




16 


Maryland 


■JEIiD 



16 



12 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . I I I 

1929 1955 19^1 19^7 1955 

Year 

Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Survey of Current Business, August 1950. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



189 



TABLE 134 



Parent-Teacher Associations in Maryland County White and Colored Schools: 

1948 and 1949 



County 




White 


Schools 








Colored 


Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1948 


1949 


1948 


1949 


1948 


1949 


1948 


1949 


Total Counties 


455 


475 


80 


8 


84 


2 


245 


250 


91 


4 


92 9 


Allegany 


34 


36 


87 


2 


92 


3 


1 


1 


50 





50.0 


Anne Arundel 


33 


36 


100 





100 





33 


31 


100 





93.9 


Baltimore 


44 


45 


93 


6 


93 


8 


16 


17 


100 





100.0 


Calvert 


7 


6 


100 





100 





15 


15 


88 


2 


88.2 


Caroline 


8 


8 


88 


9 


88 


9 


2 


3 


50 





75.0 


Carroll 


16 


16 


88 


9 


88 


9 


4 


4 


100 





100.0 


Cecil 


13 


15 


61 


9 


71 


4 


3 


3 


75 





75.0 


Charles 


9 


8 


100 





100 





21 


21 


100 





100.0 


Dorchester 


15 


19 


55 


6 


70 


4 


10 


10 


83 


3 


83. a 


Frederick 


18 


22 


58 


1 


71 





3 


4 


37 


5 


50.0 


Garrett 


26 


24 


55 


3 


51 


1 












Harford 


23 


20 


76 


7 


71 


4 


8 


8 


80 


6 


80'6 


Howard 


8 


9 


72 


7 


90 





4 


8 


50 





100.0 


Kent 


12 


12 


100 





100 





6 


6 


100 





100.0 


Montgomery 


44 


46 


97 


8 


100 





20 


20 


100 





100.0 


Prince George's 


47 


50 


88 


7 


92 


6 


37 


37 


100 





100.0 


Queen Anne's 


9 


5 


56 


3 


31 


3 


13 


13 


100 





100.0 


St. Mary's 


6 


11 


40 





68 


8 


13 


10 


92 


9 


71.4 


Somerset 


12 


12 


100 





100 





9 


9 


100 





100.0 


Talbot 


11 


11 


100 





100 





7 


9 


77 


8 


100.0 


Washington 


38 


38 


86 


3 


88 


4 


1 


1 


100 





100.0 


Wicomico 


12 


16 


75 





100 





10 


11 


90 


9 


100.0 


Worcester 


10 


10 


100 





100 





9 


9 


100 





100.0 ' 



190 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 135 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland: 1942-49 





Applicants 




Year Ending 






Number of 


June 30, 


Nonhigh School 


High School 


Certificates Issued 




Graduates* 


Graduatest 




1942 


64 




6 


1943 


70 




14 


1944 


55 




9 


1945 


72 




26 


1946 


1,128 




477 


1947 


2,411 


148 


1,169 


1948 


1,469 


129 


tl,525 


1949 


1,129 


156 


"1,288 



* Includes re-tests. 

t Includes high school graduates who took tests at request of colleges. 

X Includes 443 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 

° Includes 457 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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192 Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



193 



TABLE 138 



Total Enrollment* at Maryland State and Coppin Teachers Colleges: 
Fall of 1939-1948 



Fall of 


Total White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Coppin 


1939 


1,067 


223 


273 


571 


131 


164 


1940 


953 


221 


221 


511 


150 


156 


1941 


823 


195 


209 


419 


155 


161 


1942 


638 


145 


159 


334 


120 


154 


1943 


537 


96 


154 


287 


109 


130 


1944 


440 


83 


120 


237 


110 


134 


1945 


580 


150 


163 


267 


121 


122 


1946 


1,032 


329 


248 


455 


129 


125 


1947 


1,178 


258 


310 


610 


152 


159 


1948 


1,372 


336 


300 


736 


160 


172 



* Includes all students registered, i.e., those in teachers college, junior college, and extension and special 
students; see also TABLES 139, 140, and 141. 



TABLE 139 

Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State and Coppin Teachers Colleges: 

Fall of 1948 



Ci^ss 


Total White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Coppin 


TEACHER TRAINING 


Total 


920 


194 


126 


600 


157 


172 


Freshman 


330 


76 


18 


236 


44 


57 




249 


42 


42 


165 


45 


64 




207 


47 


37 


123 


36 


30 


Senior 


134 


29 


29 


76 


32 


21 


JUNIOR COLLEGE 


Total 


328 


68 


124 


136 


3 




Freshman 


193 


38 


70 


85 


1 






135 


30 


54 


51 


2 





OTHER STUDENTS 



Extension or 














Evening 


124 


74 


50 








Elementary School. 


528 


163 


126 


239 


120 


727 



194 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 





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Maryland State Department of Education 



195 



TABLE 141 

Enrollment in Junior Colleges of Maryland State Teachers Colleges by County-Class: 

Fall of 1948 



Area 


Total White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho-J 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Grand Total 


193 


135 


38 


30 


70 
6 


54 


85 


51 


1 


2 


Out-of-State 


9 


5 


1 


1 


4 


2 




Baltimore City .... 


47 


33 


1 


1 


1 


45 


32 






Total Counties .... 


137 


97 


36 


29 


63 


49 


38 


19 


1 


2 


Allegany 


37 


28 


35 


28 






2 








Anne Arundel . . . 
Baltimore 


3 
27 


16 


i 




3 
26 


1 
16 


1 




Calvert 














Caroline 


5 


'2 






'5 


'2 










Carroll 


1 












1 








Cecil 


1 


"5 






"i 


'5 










Charles 


3 








3 












Dorchester 


4 


'4 






4 


'4 










Frederick 






















Garrett 


1 




1 
















Howard 


7 


■3 




■3 


'2 


'4 


"i 






Kent 




1 








1 










Montgomery . . . 




1 






1 






i 






Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


1 












i 






1 


Somerset 


'7 


8 






'7 


'8 










Talbot 


3 


5 






3 


5 










Washington .... 
Wicomico 


1 

24 


1 

20 




1 


24 


20 


1 








Worcester 


11 


2 






11 


2 





























196 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 142 



Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1940-49 



Year 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Current Expenses 


Average 


Annual Cost per 
Student 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 


Total 


In Student 
Fees 


To 
State 


FROSTBURG 


1940 


214 


$80,919 


$37,869 


$43,050 


$378 


$al77 


$201 


1941 


210 


82,220 


36,535 


45,685 


392 


al74 


218 


1942 


186 


83,889 


33,398 


50,491 


451 


al79 


272 


1943 


116 


69,071 


20,757 


48,314 


595 


al79 


416 


1944 


75 


*85.257 


13,536 


*71,721 


1,136 


al80 


956 


1945 


73 


*85,601 


14,573 


*71,028 


1,173 


a200 


973 


1946 


91 


108,882 


11,281 


97,601 


1,197 


6124 


1,073 


1947 


243 


152,531 


30,820 


121,711 


628 


6127 


501 


1948 


225 


210,925 


40,024 


170,901 


937 


6178 


759 


1949 


270 


236,332 


54,730 


181,602 


875 


6203 


672 



SALISBURY 



1940 


268 


$93,633 


$48,746 


$44,887 


$350 


$al82 


$168 


1941 


211 


84,281 


40,444 


43,837 


400 


al92 


208 


1942 


194 


92,625 


37,588 


55,037 


478 


al94 


284 


1943 


143 


68,922 


23,185 


45,737 


482 


al62 


320 


1944 


114 


*87,428 


22,572 


*64,856 


767 


al98 


569 


1945 


103 


*93,031 


21,157 


*71,874 


903 


a205 


698 


1946 


153 


104,121 


22,184 


81,937 


681 


6145 


536 


1947 


280 


145,226 


46,960 


98,266 


519 


6168 


351 


1948 


273 


191,221 


64,408 


126,813 


700 


6236 


464 


1949 


258 


231,054 


54,557 


176,497 


895 


6211 


684 



TOWSON 



1940 


535 


$224,929 


$88,414 


$136,515 


$420 


$al65 


$255 


1941 


482 


219,112 


82,597 


136,515 


455 


al71 


284 


1942 


403 


222,487 


74,468 


148,019 


553 


al85 


368 


1943 


292 


187,934 


53,264 


134,670 


644 


al83 


461 


1944 


234 


*208,906 


43,145 


*165,761 


892 


al84 


708 


1945 


222 


*211,981 


46,227 


*165,754 


955 


a208 


747 


1946 


264 


250,048 


32,550 


217,498 


947 


6123 


824 


1947 


454 


325,098 


64,302 


260,796 


716 


6142 


574 


1948 


625 


430,679 


102,645 


328,034 


689 


6164 


525 


1949 


750 


469,299 


84,996 


384,303 


626 


6113 


513 



BOWIE 



1940 


121 


$57,695 


$17,098 


$40,597 


$477 


$dl41 


$336 


1941 


140 


60,295 


19,270 


41,025 


431 


dl38 


293 


1942 


144 


63,134 


19,359 


43,775 


439 


dl35 


304 


1943 


104 


56,693 


15,960 


40,733 


545 


dl53 


392 


1944 


103 


*72,307 


14,939 


*57,368 


702 


dl45 


557 


1945 


103 


*76,536 


15,099 


*61,437 


743 


dl45 


598 


1946 


121 


93,004 


17,055 


75,949 


769 


eUl 


628 


1947 


124 


108,230 


17,809 


90,421 


873 


el44 


729 


1948 


152 


163,153 


22,972 


140,181 


1,073 


/151 


922 


1949 


157 


172,046 


28,341 


143,705 


1,096 


/181 


915 



* Includes bonus payments by State. 

a Day students paid $100, women residents $316, and men boarders $128. 

'6 In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for white teacher training students at the 
Teachers Colleges was eUminated as of September, 1945. Board is $216 for teacher training students 
planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college students who are residents of Maryland pay $100 addi- 
tional, out-of-state students, $200. 

d Resident students paid $140. There is no tuition fee. 

e Resident students paid $155. There is no tuition fee. 

f Resident students paid $171. There is no tuition fee. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



197 



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198 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 145 

Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active Service and Their 
Contributions* During the Year Ending July 31, 1949 



County or Institution 



Amount Contributed Year 
Ending July 31, 1949 



Members in Active Service 
May 31, 1949 



Grand Total 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments 

Junior Colleges 

Hagerstown 

Montgomery 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 

Department 

County Libraries 

Education 

Retirement 

Other Schools 

Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys 

Montrose School for Girls 

Rosewood State Training School 

St. Mary's Seminary and Junior College 



$942,095.64 

$880,430.35 

79,670.62 
66,109.96 

126,220.60 
10,072.45 
14,307.24 
27,421.66 
22,438.52 
16,171.38 
21,321.78 
34,652.95 
19,276.93 
32,135.21 
15,906.97 
12,824.86 

120,254.41 
98,026.82 
12,537.10 
8,742.76 
15,845.19 
12,495.92 
70,193.86 
27,467.18 
16,335.98 

$61,665.29 

$4,839.99 

1,202.25 
3,637.74 

$25,314.97 

2,983.94 
5,750.48 
5,143.50 
11,437.05 

$18,120.17 

2,245.59 
15,457.58 
417.00 

$13,390.16 

731.00 
4,087.40 
3,621.96 
1,955.10 
1,794.40 
1,200.30 



5,965 

5,664 

487 
401 
790 

76 
100 
209 
157 
117 
152 
236 
129 
223 
115 

80 
670 
644 

85 

60 
113 

87 
429 
183 
121 

301 

25 

8 
17 

122 

16 
24 
26 
56 

82 

17 
62 



* To the Annuity Savings Fund. 



Maryland State Department of Education 199 



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200 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 147 



Appropriations by Source for Maryland Libraries Open to the Public and Amount per 
Capita: Year Ending June 30, 1949 





Appropriation 


FOR Public Libraries 


















1947 


Total 


County 












Population 


Amount 






City or 






(Esti- 


per 




Total 


County 


District 


State 


Other 


mated) 


Capita 






Funds 


Funds 


Funds 


Funds 




Total State 


$1,576,543 


$211,720 


$1,256,484 


$44,973 


$63,366 


2,096,979 


$.75 


Baltimore City 


1,194,030 




1,164,270 


17,182 


12,578 


947,000 


1.26 


Total Counties 


382,513 


211,720 


92,214 


27,791 


50,788 


1,149,979 


.33 


Allegany 


26,090 




23,250 




2,840 


94,423 


.28 


Anne Arundel . . . 


29,990 


19,004 


450 


4,103 


6,433 


82,826 


.36 


Baltimore 


85,917 


74,511 




6,233 


5,173 


197,636 


.43 


Calvert 












11,388 




Caroline 


414 








414 


17,930 


^02 


Carroll* 








42,430 


Cecilt 


14,005 


11,370 




2,113 


522 


28,332 


.49 


Charles 




19,859 


Dorchester 


2,568 


900 


500 




1,168 


28,994 


.09 


Frederick 


16,952 


5,000 


5,035 




6,917 


60,569 


.28 


Garrett 


6,557 


4,488 




1,758 


311 


23,495 


.28 


Harfordt 


19,562 


16,602 




2,104 


856 


40,874 


.48 


Howard 


6,712 


5,136 




1,374 


202 


18,533 


.36 


Kent 


1,088 


100 






988 


13,719 


.08 


Montgomery t . . . 
Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


37,674 


37,674 




119,602 


.31 


48,658 


33,813 


9,272 


5,369 


204 


130,500 


.37 


5,924 


4,000 




1,158 


766 


14,462 


.41 


St. Mary's 


859 








859 


32,318 


.03 


Somerset 


1,805 


900 


200 




705 


20,736 


.09 


Talbot 


15,978 


5,600 


2,500 


1,503 


6,375 


19,056 


.84 


Washington 


48,063 


20,000 


13,333 




14,730 


73,040 


.66 


Wicomico 


12,652 


9,796 




2,076 


780 


37,926 


.33 


Worcester 


1,045 


500 






545 


21,331 


.05 

















* No report on financial data. 

t Only one of two libraries reporting financial data. 
X One of six libraries not reporting. 



Maryland 



State Department of Education 



201 



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Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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204 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



TABLE 151 



Report of School Dental Clinics Conducted Under the Auspices of the Maryland State 
Department of Health, Year Ending June 30, 1949 





«« CO 

o c 




Number of 
Children 


Number of 


County 


fi 


Time 
Given to 


Ex- 


















Service 


amined by 




Total 


Fillings 


Teeth 


Clean- 


Treat- 








Dentist 


Treated 


Opera- 


Inserted 


Extracted 


ings 


ments 












tions 










Total 


27 




33,796 


6,533 


23,916 


12,725 


5,261 


1,939 


3,991 


Allegany 


1 


Full 


4,185 


753 


3,493 


634 


1,140 


344 


1,375 


Anne Arundel 


4 


Part 


1,266 


448 


1,148 


507 


490 


67 


84 


Baltimore 


11 


Part 


10,455 


1,949 


6,655 


4,332 


1,018 


564 


741 


Calvert 


2 


Part 


1,338 


220 


855 


480 


247 


14 


114 


Charles 


1 


Part 


262 


74 


74 


3 





71 





Frederick 


2 


Part 


315 


259 


789 


508 


146 


33 


102 


Howard 


1 


Part 


842 


174 


527 


164 


352 


11 





Kent 


1 


Part 


194 


248 


897 


555 


245 


20 


77 




1 


Full 


11,548 


759 


3,650 


2,257 


495 


2 


896 


Prince George's 


2 


Part 


890 


247 


873 


418 


305 


58 


92 


Washington 


1 


Full 


2,501 


1,402 


4,955 


2,867 


823 


755 


510 



* The scope of service varies, either full-time or part-time, meaning one or more one-day clinics per month. 



Maryland State Department of Education 205 



LIST OF FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL TABLES 
Maryland, 1948-49 

Page 

Financial Statements • 206-208 

I Number of Public Schools 209 

II Total Public School Enrollment 210-211 

III Catholic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff 212-213 

IV Non-Catholic, Nonpublic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching 

Staff 214-216 

V Total Nonpublic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff 217 

VI Average Number of Pupils Belonging: Public Schools 218 

VII Average Daily Attendance: Public Schools 219 

VIII Aggregate Days of Attendance: Public Schools 220 

IX Average Days in Session; Per Cent of Attendance: Public 

Schools 221 

X Number of Teaching and County OfRce Positions: Public 

Schools 222-223 

XI A. Receipts from State of Maryland 224 

B. Receipts from Federal Government 225 

XII Receipts from All Sources 226 

XIII Disbursements for All Purposes 227 

XIV Disbursements for General Control 228 

XV Disbursements for Instruction and Operation 229 

XVI Disbursements for Maintenance, Auxiliarv Agencies, and Fixed 

Charges ' 230 

XVII Disbursements for Debt Service and Capital Outlay 231 

XVIII Disbursements for White Elementary Schools 232 

XIX Disbursements for White High Schools 233 

XX Disbursements for Colored Elementary Schools 234 

XXI Disbursements for Colored High Schools 235 

XXII Cost, Teachers, Enrollment, Attendance, Graduates and Courses 

in Individual Public High Schools 236-241 

XXIII Enrollment by Subject in Individual Public High Schools 242-247 

XXIV Statistics of Public Libraries 248-249 



206 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



207 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Department of Education and the State Teachers Colleges, for the 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1949 



Source or Purpose 


State 
Department 
of Education 


Towson 
State Teach- 
ers College 


Frostburg 
State Teach- 
ers College 


Salisbury 
State Teach- 
ers College 


Bowie 
State Teach- 
ers College 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 

1947-1948 

General Fund Appropriation 

Students' Fees 

Receipts to Budget Items 

Transfers by Budget Amendment 

Total Funds Available 


$ 9,204.78 
337,647.00 

34,453.03 
33,729.00 


$ 43,701.41 
147,945.00 
22,369.14 
20,694.32 
2,880.00 


$ 11,522.81 
168,699.00 
44,680.04 
24.416.68 
4,309.00 


$15,000.00 
133,617.00 
54,557.19 
13,611.03 
28,389.00 


$ 5,981.20 
319,411.00 
85,434.07 
53,046.53 
47,016.00 


$415,033.81 


$237,589.87 


$253,627.53 


$245,174.22 


$510,888.80 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries, Wages, and Special 

Payments 


$300,791.03 
445.48 
999.27 
42.00 
23,874.42 
131.31 
12,024.92 


$109,887.46 
2,191.02 
500.29 
5,977.84 
203.55 
12.55 
844.61 

776.74 
1,132.43 
24,461.08 
751.10 
2,606.74 
396.14 
209.45 

931.90 


$155,197.38 
5,689.28 
182.38 
3,140.51 
798.79 
48.44 
1,178.81 

674.75 
2,900.00 
15,190.89 


$146 324.70 
2!784!84 
174.73 

654.89 
1,315.96 
789.17 

1,828.63 


$336,478.99 
2,522.96 
826.90 
8,774.32 
1,172.07 
196.74 
3,600.87 

4,269.25 
425 47 
39,913!04 
174.94 
17,405.27 
1,829.31 
443.12 

1,559.44 
29.20 

3,790.78 

359.38 
1,961.47 

270.02 

388.54 
5,189.21 

526.39 
2,350.21 

229.64 
50.00 
1,001.94 


General Repairs 


Motor Vehicle Repairs 


Light, Heat, Power, and Water . . 
Travel 


Transportation 


Communication 


Printing Other than Office 

Supplies 


All Other Contractual Services . . . 
Food 


4,261.32 


36,610.43 


Forage and Veterinary Supplies . . 
Fuel 






2,957.64 
252.01 
1,068.11 

337.00 


4,674.53 
729.79 
581.52 

892 49 
22.70 

3,603.57 


Office Supplies 


7,322.19 


Medical and Laboratory Supplies 
Laundry, Cleaning, and Disin- 
fecting Supplies 




Refrigeration Supplies 




Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Supplies 


8,691.15 


i,l<OD.oo 

65.69 
1,355.22 
6.35 


1 7^7 QR 

1, < < .yo 

199.23 
703.44 
49.94 


Agricultural and Botanical Sup- 
plies 


Motor Vehicle Supplies 


3 611.09 


714.89 


Power Plant Supplies ' 


Wearing Apparel 










1,339.37 
12.95 
247.26 

2.90 
166.30 


2,116.80 
43.82 
1,210.59 

120.38 


2,141.54 
19.00 
1,093.74 


All Other Supplies 


1,499.62 


Building Materials 


Motor Vehicle Equipment 
Material 




Materials for Equipment 




26.89 


Highway Materials 






All Other Materials 








47.04 
728.00 
1,009.55 

541.50 


Office Equipment 


8,437.76 


6.50 
738.56 


372.58 
2,639.49 

1,228.49 




Household Equipment 

Medical and Laboratory Equip- 
ment 




2,671.81 


Live Stock 






324.00 

796.88 
2,717.98 

5,720.94 
48.87 


Agricultural and Botanical 
Equipment 




226.85 






Motor Vehicles 


2,237.95 
688.56 


105.00 

3,451.31 
65.67 




Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Equipment 


1,468.45 


3,103.67 
2.80 


Tools and Machinery 


Rent 


1,045.00 




All Other Equipment 








11.84 


Structural Equipment 






10,978.62 
328.73 




Insurance 


506.34 


900.00 


453.70 


1,587.41 
479.00 
16,189.92 
20,521.98 
5,900.08 
1,228.00 
1.31 


All Other Fixed Charges 


Cafeteria 




10.362.78 


10,021.30 
11,824.91 
11,322.02 
1,887.50 


14,997.05 
6,386.28 
221.41 
1,557.00 


Veterans' Clearing Account 




Prior Year Funds . . . 


6,747.67 


18,094.83 
56.00 


Refunds on Students' Fees. 


Summer Session . . . 




Total Disbursements . . 










$383,357.08 


$187,888.79 


$250,043.77 


$238,997.04 


$493,939.49 


Unexpended Balance Returned to 
State Treasury . . . 


$ 21,898.50 


$ 3,565.58 


$ 3,575.07 


$ 3,208.37 


$ 6,469.12 


Balance, June 30, 1949 


$ 9,778.23 


$ 46,135.50 


$ 8.69 


$ 2,968.81 


$ 10,480.19 





208 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers Colleges, Fiscal Year Ending 

June 30, 1949 



Source and Purpose 


Total 


Bowie 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Co-sh. B&lsncG Brought Forwsrd. from 1948 
General Bond Issue of 1939 


$ 44,394.82 

49,809.39 
2,386.98 
34,730.21 




$44,394.82 
5,250.24 




$32,576.15 


Unexpended Amounts Remaining in the 
General Construction Loan of 1947 

Deferred Maintenance 


$11,983.00 
2,386.98 




Reconstruction of Dormitory 




Construction of Dormitory for Boys . . . 

Total Available 




$ 3,730.21 


31,000.00 


$131,321.40 


$14,369.98 


$49,645.06 


$ 3,730.21 


$63,576.15 


Disbursements 

General Bond Issue of 1939 


$44,394.82 

22,384.13 
2,299.58 

3,504.97 
114.40 




$44,394.82 
2,750.24 






General Construction Loan of 1947 

Deferred Maintenance 






$19,633.89 


Reconstruction of Dormitory 


$ 2,299.58 




Construction of Dormitory for 
Boys 




$ 3,504.97 




Purchase of Dormitory Equipment 

Total Disbursements 

General Construction Loan of 1947 




114.40 




$72,697.90 

$27,310.86 
87.40 

31,225.24 


$ 2,299.58 

$11,983.00 
87.40 


$47,259.46 
$ 2,385.60 


$ 3,504.97 


$19,633.89 
$12,942.26 
31,000.00 


Reconstruction of Dormitory 




Construction of Dormitory for 
Boys 




$ 225.24 


Balance Forwarded to 1950 . . . 






$58,623.50 


$12,070.40 


$ 2,385.60 


$ 225.24 


$43,942.26 



Maryland State Department of Education 



209 



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Eighty-Third Annual Report 





r, Jr.-Sr., and 
onal H. Schools 


ii 


1,667.6 


331.0 


283.4 
47.6 


1,336.6 


o o o eo in X «o <o OS -H X o 00 1-^ o in «c t> 
inincoc^^ego^xxin^CiOxocoegcDcoosegt- 
Tj.;Di>r-<eot>iniHeg«oeMt>eoego«!cgegegcgi>eoeq 




Men 


1,158.2 


307.3 


235.6 
72.3 


850.9 


rH o 05 «o o eo ?c o o ^ o> in eg T}< o OS o o in o o © 
cDOT}*ocxocodC5inint^X'— *eoC5^^^^o^-HT— ( 
ic^y-^ i-c«i<e6 »-i eo eo eo -H r-( X t> »H i-(rH05egeg 




o 


Total 


2,825.8 


638.3 


518.4 
119.9 


2,187.5 


th rj< eo «£> o o eo in eg t> 00 eo ^ t> q 00 eg q «o t^^ 
i-Hin^"degeg->*int-^eO'^oit>eg-^d-^o6i-Hegdeo*oc 
eooo>egin^xcg-^o«Oi-<ineoo5-^eoegT}"«tt>inTf 
eg-teg rn ^ T-ieg '-h 


E Pupils 


r High 


^ s 


763.7 


452.2 


452'.2 


311.5 


13.5 
45.0 
45.8 

2.2 
1.1 

11.5 
9.0 

25.1 

76.2 
48.0 

34.1 


te Junio 
Schools 


Men 


315.3 


141.7 


141.7 


173.6 


qxoc • -.-^rj-qqun ■ ■ • -^q ■ -q -o, • ■ 

O ^ CO . 0*3 00 O . CO . ^ . o 

rHcgeo ^ -t^ eg 


o 


Separa 


Total 


1,079.0 


593.9 


593.9 


485.1 


Tj< 00 q • • eo in in q q • • ■ ■ q q • • q • x ■ • 
^ Oi . ^ eo o eg in .... Oi o . *— ^ . ^ 
eg«oc~ eg— leo —ito m 


HOOLS F( 


hools 


is 


2,431.3 


783.2 


452.2 
283.4 
47.6 


1,648.1 


inTi<cgqqqqxqegoqqqqeoooqoqt-_qqqt> 
X o eg eg ^ ^ ^ t— eo in ^ o ^ x eo eg ^ ^ eo eg 
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1-1 -H eg ^ eg i-i 


M 
2 

m 
OS 


High Sc 


Men 


1,473.5 


449.0 


141.7 
235.0 
72.3 


1,024.5 


qoct>qq'5rqqqqqqeg-^-^qqqinqqqq 
o^S^'^2r?«2eg'5coeo2^So>^'^lH5H^?aej 


) Teachi 


Total 


Total 


3,904.8 


1,232.2 


593.9 
518.4 
119.9 


2,672.6 


q eg q q q q q 00 q 00 1-. ^ 00 eo t> t- q 00 eg q eg q t> 

int^?SS;^x$S;coSS25Sj2oTOcg^r?caS-^ 
eg-neo ^ — i — i eoeo eg 


PALS AN! 


00 
t- 


o£ 
^6 


4,487.9 


1,492.8 
1,460.4 
32.4 


2,995.1 


'-;eg'Hqq«cqqTj<qqqeot>qqqqt-_q'-;eg-<a; 
eg ej ^ eg eo ^ ^ t— x m eo ^ t— x in x o 
m— ia5cg-^>-ix-^«>e^x^ineot>«ceor}«eoeoMX-* 
egeg-"*" —i — i »-h eoeo eg 


Princi 


ntary 1-6 


Men 


248.1 


03 «0 t> • • • 

« d <N : 

t> in (M 


174.8 


t-qc-q -egxqqqqqq -qq -q -qqq • 
-Htoeoeg . ^ ^ — i eg so eo -g* ."^^^ 




Eleme; 


Total 


4,736.0 


1,566.1 
1,511.0 
55.1 


3,169.9 


xegxcoxt~ooin«oineot>'^xqo5t-_qqcg'^ 
eo X o CD eg in in ^ o x c^i x cc e^ in t— eg x 05 eg 
«0'-<'*eg-^i-'X-^tOTtoegineoa5t>eo'>s'eoeO'^X'* 
egegin — c -i— i-i eoeo eg 




lools 


og 
^ £ 


6,919.2 


O Tt ■Tf eg Tj< CD 

d d eg ig eo t— ' 

«D eo o X 
cg_^-<r -<j"cg 
cg*^' 


4,643.2 


q q q q q eg -"i; X q eg ^ q q eg « q t> T)| q X <-j 

2eg2eot^xcot^S^2SSininc^§S«S«o^^t- 
eo t- 1-t ^ eg ^ ^ in in eoi-i 




All White Scl 


Men 


1,721.6 


eo ;c c~_ c-^ o eo 
eg d eg >-< lii eg 
eg m eg eo t~ 
lO »-i eg 


1,199.3 


t~X'^«DO«Dxo^o-H05ineg'>t05egqoqq'-;qq 
xoegoxxt*05'^egcD»-Hi-^T.H?DO— *t— ino»"*eo»^ 
o Oi "-1 ^ eo >-i eg «D in eg ^ o "-H — legeocgeg 




Total 


8,640.8 


2,798.3 
1,511.0 


55.1 
593.9 
518.4 
119.9 


5,842.5 


eor»<^-;coxegxqqq^O'-io-^qqt>qqxx.-H 
aieo^d'^'^eodeodd'^ddeo'd'HiHd'-ieginto 
»-i05-HTj<c5eot~05egi~t>eo^«DOc-t-c-xxt-eoo5 
meooi eg—I — leg—ieg^ ■^'-< 


w 
Q S 


Bjooqas M3tH 

•OO^ pUB 

••JS--Jf 'joiuas 


3,312.5 


781.5 


608.6 
172.9 


2,531.0 


eg q q q q q q q t- c- t- X ^ eg q X t- q q q c-_ 
c>»-<Tt-»reod'^^eoeO'-<t^t>egc-^^'^050t-c--^a5 
eo-^egeo«c^ai'<i'«0'-i<»eg«0'^'-it>"«3'eo«oint>t-in 
e^i-ieo th — I r-t egeg 




siooqos 
qSijj JOtunf 

e^BJBdas 


1,333.1 


815.4 


815.4 


517.7 


TfoccD ■ eomegoq ■ • • qq ■ -q 'X -q 
tt d o> ■ ; -"t eo' T)I eg in ; ; oi ! ! '. ! t- 
eg5Dt> egrieo ^x m 


White ane 
Principals ai 


Ele- 
men- 
tary 


6,287.9 


2,470.5 
2,383.4 
87.1 


3,817.4 


xt-egooot>egoinqinqt>qxoqt-;qi-;'-Hq 
oc d d i.n eo o: in X* eg ^-• in d eo in eo eo eo eg 
;DOOininegoiX05inOTj<t-Tteoc-in«£>«o?Dini-ic- 
egeoto i-h — i— i— i ■<i' t!< egi-i 


Total 


10,933.5 


4,067.4 
2,383.4 
87.1 
815.4 
608.6 
172.9 


6,866.1 


■^OiXscotcegCTsmxeocooinooq-^-^qxt-^eg 
d-HdocdocrHTfddddegdcgegt-ininxinTfo 
cc^oooeg'^a>ini>ot>50'<ta>c~eoa5oeg^xx-<a< 
in mo ^eg'-Hi-H'-ieo^e^'-i t-x ,-iTHT-(Tt,-i— i 


County 


Total State 


Baltimore City . . 
Elementary ... 
Occupational . . 
Junior High , . . 
Senior High . . . 
Vocational .... 


Total Counties . . . 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



223 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



225 



TABLE XI-B — Receipts from the Federal Government for Public School Purposes in Mary- 
land: Year Ending June 30, 1949 











From Veterans Administration 




County 


Total 
Federal 
Funds 


Vocational 
Education 


School 
Lunch 
Program 


Institutional 
On-the-Farm 
Training 


On-the-job, 
Related 
Training 


Schools 


Other 


XUtai ol/dLfc! . . . . 


$1,235,487.40 


$205,671.51 


$569,549.34 


$164,691.74 


$59,651.85 


$139,489.77 




Baltimore City . 


277,449.81 


*48,376.16 


*139,694.37 




38,875.32 


50,503.96 




Total Counties 


958,037.59 


157,295.35 


429,854.97 


164,691.74 


20,776.53 


88,985.81 


96,433.19 


Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline .... 


195,373.35 
46,736.72 
75,681.82 
21,041.49 
12,536.42 


*21, 562.78 
*7,545.49 

*18,864.15 
2,081.57 
*1,421.09 


*95,475.90 
*28,509.09 
*46,723.57 
*2,200.49 
*6,493.25 


*4,467.16 
10,064.08 
8,615.15 
16,759.43 
♦4,622.08 


*2,37'5.60 
*618.06 
1,478.95 


71,491.91 




Carroll 


27,353.23 
13,380.93 
67,369.84 
17,915.45 
45,394.09 


*1,281.08 
*1,568.37 


*11,810.92 
*6,612.91 


11,573.88 
*4,639.94 


*2,687.35 
559.71 






Cecil 






Charles 

Dorchester . . 
Frederick . . . 


*1,043.22 
*4,564.08 
*5,766.58 


*4,437.15 
*7,232.27 
*23,225.23 


9,149.96 
4,647.31 
9,411.17 


*1,084.18 
*6,991.11 




t52,739.51 
387.61 


Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


16,907.65 
35,773.60 
21,240.37 
10,427.48 
92,293.53 


*6,604.26 
*6,682.51 
*4,226.21 
*1,444.84 
33,905.07 


*3,432.16 
*20,121.57 
*9,322.68 
*3,743.15 
*48,106.74 


6,871.23 
8,969.52 
7,691.48 
*5,239.49 
2,219.52 








Montgomery 


1,167.20 




+ 6,895.00 


Pr. George's . 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's. . . 
Somerset. . . . 
Talbot 


76,651.34 
8,408.33 
37,591.26 
21,147.87 
11,706.49 

76,331.76 
17,409.63 
9,364.94 


*9,201.97 
*1,307.58 
*227.76 
*2,166.72 
*3,771.42 

*17,691.82 
*1,710.30 
*2,656.48 


*48,974.07 
*4,362.17 
720.98 
*7,528.36 
*5,361.03 

*30,446.23 
*9,270.56 
*5,744.49 


*18,475.30 
*2,738.58 
231.45 
11,452.79 
2,574.04 

8,737.09 
5,168.59 
372.50 






t36,411.07 


Washington . 
Wicomico . . . 
Worcester . . . 


1,962.72 
1,260.18 
*591.47 


17,493.90 





* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30, 1948 and excludes those for the current 
year received after June 30, 1949. 

t For salaries, operation and maintenance expenditures at the Indian Head School in Charles County and the 
Frank Knox School in St. Mary's County. 

t Includes $3,520.00 from nonresident patrons of day schools. 



226 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 



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$5,615.62 

1,567.77 

4,047.85 

120.00 
417.79 
588.59 
209.35 
131.50 


66.50 
166.25 
120.63 
106.48 


169.59 
201.60 
1S6.37 
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222.50 
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94.27 
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119.63 


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$47,692.24 

22,575.97 

25.116.27 

614.34 
3,767.25 
2,787.40 
183.55 
735.46 

482.07 
1,666.48 
756.40 
490.83 
683.85 


1.643.38 
497.74 
205.85 

2,592.11 

3 693 48 
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646.30 
188:43 
856.15 

741.82 
787.04 
417.05 


Textbooks 


$36,316.95 

11,493.64 

24.823.31 

514.58 
2,264.97 
4.232.99 
950.80 
776.64 

723.10 
919.54 
2.651.22 
400.00 
477.62 


801.77 
983.73 
646.78 
1,900.47 

1.797.74 
879.35 
623.88 
561.14 
418.87 

444.66 
666.57 
1,186.89 



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Anne Arundel 

Arundel Sr.-Jr 

Glen Burnie Sr.-Jr 

Southern Sr.-Jr 

Odenton Jr 

Glen Burnie Jr 

Annapolis Jr 

Bates Colored Sr.-Jr 

Baltimore 

Franklin Sr.-Jr 

Sparks Sr.-Jr 

Dundalk Sr.-Jr 

Kenwood Sr.-Jr 

Sparrows Point S»t-Jr 

Fifth District Jr 

Sixth District Jr 

Seventh District Jr 

Carroll Manor Jr 

Fullerton Jr 

23 Elem. Schools with Jr. 7th 
Banneker Colored Sr.-Jr. . . . 
Carver Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 
Sollers Point Colored Sr.-Jr. 



Maryland State Department of Education 243 





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Calvert County Sr.-Jr, 
Brooks Colored Sr.-Jr 

Caroline 

Greensboro Sr.-Jr 

Caroline Sr.-Jr 

Preston Sr.-Jr 

Federalsburg Sr.-Jr 

Ridgely Sr.-Jr 

Lockerman Colored Sr.-Jr. . 

Carroll 

Taney town Sr.-Jr 

Sykesville Sr.-Jr 

Manchester Sr.-Jr 

Westminster Sr.-Jr 

Hampstead Hr.-Jr 

New Windsor Sr.-Jr 

Elmer Wolfe Sr.-Jr 

Mt. Airy Sr.-Jr 

Charles Carroll Jr 

Moton Colored Sr.-Jr 

Cecil 

Cecilton Sr.-Jr. 

Chesapeake City Sr.-Jr 

Elkton Sr.-Jr 

Northeast Sr.-Jr.. . . 

Rising Sun Sr.-Jr 

Perryville Sr.-Jr 

Calvert Sr.-Jr 

Ken more Jr.. . 

Carver Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 


Charles 

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La Plata Sr.-Jr 

Nanjemoy Jr 

Glasva Jr 

Indian Head Jr 

Hughesville Jr 

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Dorchester 

(.'ambridge Sr 

I'^ast iNew Market hr.-Jr. . . . 

Vienna Sr.-Jr 

Crapo Sr.-Jr 

Hurlock Sr.-Jr 

Cambridge Jr 

F. D. St. Clair Col. Sr.-Jr. . . 



244 



Eighty-Third Annual Report 





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Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr 

Thurmont Sr.-Jr 

Brunswick Sr.-Jr 

Walkersville Sr.-Jr 

Elm St. Jr 

Liberty Jr 

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Garrett 

Friendsville Sr.-Jr 

Grantsville Sr.-Jr 

Accident Sr.-Jr 

Oakland Sr.-Jr 

Kitzmiller Sr.-Jr 

Harford 

Old Post Road Sr.-Jr 

Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 

Belair Sr.-Jr 

Jarrettsville Sr.-Jr 

Slate Ridge Sr.-Jr 

Highland. Sr.-Jr 

Dublin Sr.-Jr 

Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr 

Belair Colored Sr.-Jr 

Havre de Grace Col. Sr.-Jr. 

Howard 

Elkridge Sr.-Jr 

Ellicott City Sr.-Jr 

Lisbon Sr.-Jr 

Clarksville Sr.-Jr 

Cooksville Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 

Kent 

Millington Sr.-Jr 

Galena Sr.-Jr 

Chestertown Sr.-Jr 

Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 

Garnett Colored Sr.-Jr 



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INDEX 



Academic course, each high school, 236-241 
Accreditation and certification, 48-52 
Administration 
General control 

Cost per pupil, 160-161 
Expenditure, 228 
Per cent for, 158-159 
Superintendents, 2, 4-6, 223, 228 
Adult education, 148-150, 168, 171-172, 230 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 148-149 
Enrollment, 100-101, 111 

Each high school, 242-247 
Failures and withdrawals, 121 
Federal aid, 168-172 
Schools offering, 122, 242-247 
Teachers, 122 
Aid from State and /or Federal funds 
Counties and Baltimore City 
Distribution by type of fund 
1948-1949, 156-157, 206, 224-225 
1923-1949, 154-155 
State teachers colleges, 196-197, 206-207 
Vocational education, 168-170, 172, 206, 225 
Vocational rehabilitation, 153, 206 
Appropriations 
County 

1948- 1949, 156-157, 206, 224, 226 

1949- 1950, 181-182 
1923-1949, 154-155 

State 

1948-1949, 156-157, 206, 224 

Art 

Enrollment, high school, 100-101, 112 
Each high school, 242-247 

Schools offering, 122, 242-247 

Teachers, 122 
Assessable basis, 184-186 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of, 220 

Average daily, 219 

Each high school, 236-241 

Index of elementary school, 82 

Per cent of, 80-83, 221 

Summer school pupils, 150 

Teachers at summer school, 125 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 151 
Auxiliary agencies 

Cost per pupil for, 162-165 

Expenditures for, 230, 232-235 

Per cent of current expense budget, 158-159 



B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 114 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 206, 224 
Belonging, average number, 218 

Each high school, 236-241 

Per teacher, 140-141 
Birth rates, 78-79 

Board of Education, State, 2, 206-207 
Boards of Education, County, 4-6 
Bonds outstanding, school, 178 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 162, 164 
High, 163, 165 
Expenditures 
All schools, 229 
Elementary, 232, 234 
High, 233, 235 
Per cent of current expense budget, 158-159 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 
By grade, 83 
Total 

Nonpublic schools, 212-217 
Public schools, 210-211 
Graduates, high school, 92-99, 236-241 



B — (Continued) 

Budgets 

Local, county, and Baltimore City 

1948- 1949, 156-157, 227 

1949- 1950, 181-182 
1923-1949, 154-155 

State public school, 206 

State teachers colleges, 207-208 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 

Number of, 143. 145-147, 209 

Value of school per pupil, 179-180 
Business education 

Adult, 148-150 

Enrollment, 100-101, 109, 113, 168-169, 172 

Each high school, 242-247 
Failures and withdrawals, 120 
Schools offering, 122, 242-247 
Teachers, 122 



Capital outlay, school 

By site, building, equipment, 231 

By type of school, 162-^165, 177, 232-235 

By year, 1923-1949, 154-155 

Census, school, 1948, 66-73 

Certificates held by county teachers, 126-130 

Certification and accreditation, 48-52 

Evening school, 148-150, 230 

Size of, 140-141 

Special for handicapped, 89-91 

Summer school, Baltimore City, 150 
Clerks, county schools, 139, 223 
Colleges 

High school graduates 
of 1948 entering, 95-99 

of 1949 entering State teachers, 93, 236-241 
Junior. 193, 195 
State teachers. 3, 191-197 

Training teachers appointed in Maryland 
counties, 123-124 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 144 

Transportation of pupils, 172-176 
Construction accounts. State teachers colleges, 

208 

Core program 

Enrollment. 100-101 

Each high school. 242-247 

Schools offering. 122, 242-247 

Teachers, 122 
Cost per pupil 

Analyzed for elementary and high school 
pupils, 162-165 

By type of school, 161 

General control, 160-161 

Individual high schools, 236-241 

State teachers colleges, 196 

Transported, 172, 175 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, and super- 

CoTirses'in individual high schools, 236-241 
Crippled children, services for, 89, 91, 203 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil. 160-165 

Individual high schools, 236-241 
Expenditures 
All schools, 227 
By type of school, 232-235 

D 

Dates 

Days in session, 74, 221 
Opening and closing of schools, 
Debt service 

1948- 1949, 179, 231 

1949- 1950, 181-182 
Dental program, 204 



250 



Index 



251 



D— (Continued) 

Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 168-169, 173 
Diversified occupations, 245 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 115 

Schools oflFering, 122 

Teachers, 122 

E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 138, 223 
Employment of high school graduates, 93-96 
English, high school 

Enrollment, 100-101, 103 

Each high school, 242-247 
Failures and withdrawals, 120-121 
Schools offering, 122, 242-247 
Teachers, 122 
Enrollment 

Adult, 148, 150 

Atypical children, 151 

Elementary, 65, 75-76, 83-85, 210-217 

Grade or year, 83-85 

High school 

Course, each school, 236-241 
Growth in, 166-167 
Subjects, 100-101, 103-113 

Each school, 242-247 
Year, 83-85, 102 

Each school, 236-241 
Increase in, 75-77 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 65, 76-77, 
212-217 

Public. 65, 75-77, 83-85, 210-211 

State teachers colleges, 193-195 

Subject, high school, 100-101, 103-113 
Each school, 242-247 

Summary, 65, 76-77 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 150 
Equalization fund, 156-157, 224 
Equivalence examinations, 190 
Evening schools and courses 

Enrollment, 148-150 

Expenditures, 168, 171-172, 230 
Expenditures, 227-235 

(See also General control. Instruction, Op- 
eration, Maintenance, Auxiliary agencies. 
Fixed charges. Payments to adjoining 
counties, Current expenses. Debt service. 
Capital outlay) 

Elementary schools, 232, 234 

Evening schools, 168, 171-172, 230 

Health, 202, 230 

High schools, 233, 235 

Libraries, 230 

Salaries 

All schools, 229 
Elementary, 232, 234 
High, 166-167, 233, 235 
Vocational, 168-172 

State teachers colleges, 196-197, 206-208 

Total, by major classifications, 206, 227 

Transportation, 172, 174-175, 230 

Vocational, Federal, 168-172. 225 

F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Federal aid 

Federal Works Agency, 225 
Vocational education, 168-172, 206, 225 
Administration and supervision, 172 
Salaries of teachers 
Baltimore City, 168 
County, day, 168-170 
County, evening, 168, 171 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 196-197, 206-207 
Finance and research, division of, 53-54 
Financial statements 

County schools, 224-235 
State public schools, 206 
State teachers colleges, 206-208 
First grade, nonpromotions, 86 



F— (Continued) 

Fixed charges, 230 
French 

Enrollment, 100-101, 110 
Each high school, 242-247 

Failures and withdrawals, 120 

Schools offering, 122, 242-247 

Teachers, 122 

G 

General control 

Cost per pupil, 160, 161 
Expenditures, 228 
Per cent for, 158-159 
Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 114 
Grade enrollment, 83-85, 102 
Graduates 

High school, 92-99 

Entering State teachers colleges, 93, 95-96, 

98-99 * 
From each school, 236-241 
Occupations of, 93-99 
State teachers colleges, 191-192 
Guidance, teachers of, 122 

H 

Handicapped children 

Employment of, 72-73 

Expenditures, 89, 206 

Home instruction, 89, 210-211 

Hospital schools, 89, 210-211 

Institutions for, 89, 151 

Opportunities for education of, 89-91 

Receipts from State, 89, 206, 224 

Transportation, 89 
Health 

Activities of State and County Departments 
of, 202-204 

Expenditures 
All schools, 230 
By county health offices, 202 
Hearing, conservation of, 89, 91 
High school equivalence examinations, 190 
High schools 

Aid for, 224 

Disbursements, 233, 235 

Individual, 235-247 

Supervision, 138, 223 
Home economics 

Adult, 148-150, 168, 171 

Enrollment. 100-101, 111 
Each high school, 242-247 

Federal aid, 168-172 

Schools offering, 122. 242-247 

Teachers, 122 
Home instruction of pupils. 89, 210-211 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 89, 210-211 



I 

Immunizations. 203 

Income payments, per capita, 188 

Income tax, per capita, 187 

Incorporated towns, levy for, 182 

Index of school attendance, 82 

Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 

Instruction 

Cost per pupil, 162-165 

Division of, 40-47 

Expenditures, 232-235 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 229 
State teachers colleges. 196-197 

Per cent of current expense budget for, 
158-159 
Inventories, 197 

J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, etc., 139 
Junior colleges, 193, 195 

K 

Kindergartens, 83-85. 212-217 



252 



Index 



L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Late entrants, elementary, 82 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 1949, 15-35 

Length of session, 74, 221 

Letter of transmittal, 8 

Levies, county, 181-183 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 201, 229 

Public. 200, 248-249 

School, 199, 201 
Library extension, 3, 55-58, 199-201, 206, 

248-249 
Lip reading classes, 91 

M 

Maintenance * 
Cost per pupil, 162-165 
Expenditures, 230, 232-235 

Per cent of current expense budget for, 
158-159 

Materials of instruction and books (see Books 

and instructional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 100-101, 108-109 
Each high school, 242-247 

Failures and withdrawals, 120-121 

Schools offering, 122, 242-247 

Teachers, 122 
Medical examinations 

Pupils, 203 

Teachers, 206 
Men teachers, 124, 222-223 
Mentally handicapped children, 89-91 
Minutes of State Board, notes from, 36-39 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 100-101, 112 
Each high school, 242-247 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 114 

Schools offering, 122, 242-247 

Teachers, 122 

N 

Night schools (see Evening schools, Adult Edu- 
cation) 
Nonpromotions 

Elementary, 86-88 
First grade, 86 
Subject, high school 
Each subject, 120-121 
One or more subjects, 116-119 
Number belonging, 218 

Each high school, 236-241 
Per teacher, 140-141 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 151 
Having one teacher, 144 
Nonpublic, 65, 212-217 
Public, 65, 209 

Elementary, 143-144 
High, 145-147 
Nurses, public health, 202 



o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 93-99 
One-teacher schools 

Cost per pupil, 162-165 

Decrease in, 144 

Number belonging in, 144 
Per teacher, 140 

Number of, 144, 209 

Per cent of attendance in, 81 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 162-165 

Expenditures, 229, 232-235 

Per cent of current expense budget for, 
158-159 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 114 



P 

Parent-teacher associations, 189 

Parochial and private schools, 76-77, 212-217 

Part-payment of salaries, 224 

Payments to adjoining counties, 158-159 

Pensions, 198, 206 

Physical education and health, 202-204, 230 

Physical education and recreation 
Appropriations for, 206 
Enrollment, high school, 100-101, 112 

Each high school, 242-247 
Schools offering, 122, 242-247 
Teachers, 122 

Physical examinations (see Medical examina- 
tions ) 

Physically handicapped children, 89-91 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 3 
Private and parochial schools, 76-77, 212-217 
Property, valuation of 

County and Baltimore City, 184-186 

School, 179-180 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 4-6 

Supervisors. 138, 223 
Salaries of. 228 
Pupils 

Atypical. 151 

Nonpublic. 65. 76-77. 212-217 
One-teacher schools. 144 
Per teacher, 140-141 
Public 

Enrollment, 65, 75-77, 210-211 
Number attending, 219 
Number belonging, 218 
Per cent of attendance, 80-81, 83. 221 
Transported, 172-175 



R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 226 

Federal government, 225 

Evening schools, counties, 171 
Teachers' salaries, counties. 168-172 

State 

Distributed by type of fund. 154-155, 206, 
224 

Total and per cent, 154-155 
Teachers colleges, 196-197, 206-207 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 2-3, 61-64, 152-153, 
206-207 

Repair, utility men, janitors, etc., 139 
Resignations, teachers, 131-132 
Retarded children, classes for, 89-91 
Retirement system for teachers, 3, 198, 206 



s 

Salaries 

Growth of high school, 166-167 
Per cent of school budget, 158-159 
Superintendents. 228 
Supervisors. 229 

Pupil personnel, 229 
Teachers 

Average per teacher, 141-142 

Cost per pupil, 162-165 
Total 

Elementary, 232, 234 
High, 166-167, 233, 235 
Vocational, 168-170, 172 
School census, 1948, 66-73 
Schools 

For atypical children, 151 
Number of, 65, 143-147. 209 
Science, high school 

Enrollment. 100-101, 106-107 
Each high school, 242-247 
Failures and withdrawals, 120-121 
Schools offering, 122, 242-247 
Teachers, 122 
Session, length of, 74, 221 



Index 253 



S— (Continued) 

Sex of teachers, 124. 222-223 

Sight conservation classes and tests, 91 

Size of 

Classes, 140-141 
Schools 

Each high school, 236-241 
Elementary, 143-144 
High. 145-147 
Teaching statf. 143-145, 147, 222-223 
Social studies, high school 
Enrollment, 100-101, 104-105 
Each high school, 242-247 
Failures and withdrawals, 120-121 
Schools offering, 122, 242-247 
Teachers, 122 
Source of new teachers, 137 
Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped children, 89-91, 

206 

Special education, 45-47 
Special high school teachers, 122 
State 
Aid 

To health, 202 

To schools. 1923-1949. 154-155 
Showing various school funds, 206, 224 
Board of Education, 2, 206 

Notes from minutes, 36-39 
Department of Education, 2-3, 206-207 
Department of Health 
Expenditures. 202 
School activities. 202-204 
Income taxes, 187 
Public school budget. 206-207 
Superintendent's report, 9-14 
Teachers colleges. 93-96, 98-99, 191-197, 206- 

208, 236-241 
Teachers' retirement system, 3, 198, 206 
Statistical tables, 205-249 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping, 113 
Subjects studied in high school. 100-101, 103-115 

Each high school, 242-247 
Summer school attendance 
County teachers, 125 
Pupils, 150 
Superintendents, 2. 4-6, 223 
Superintendent's report, 9-14 
Supervision, supervisors 

Cost per pupil for. 162-165 
Cost, salaries and expenses. 227 

By type of school, 232-235 
Names of, 2-3. 4-6 
Number of, 138, 223 

Per cent of current expense budget for, 

158-159 
Salaries of, 229, 232-235 
State, 2-3 

T 

Taxable basis, 184-186 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 158-159 
Teachers * 

Academic, high school. 122 

Certification of, 126-130 

Colleges, 3, 93, 95-96, 98-99, 191-197, 206-208, 
236-241 



T— (Continued) 

Growth in number of. 166-167 
Number of, 222-223 

For each high school subject, 122 
In each high school, 236-241 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 151 
Nonpublic, 212-217 
Public. 222-223 

Summer schools. Baltimore City, 150 
Of atypical children. 151 
Pupils per, 140-141 
Resignations of, 131-132 
Salaries, growth in high school. 166-167 
Sex of. 124, 222-223 
Source of, new to counties, 137 
Special subjects, high school, 122 
Summary, elementary and high, public and 

nonpublic, 65 
Summer school attendance. 125 
Training institutions, 191-197. 206-208 
Turnover of. 131-135 
Teachers' retirement system 
Financial statement. 198, 206 
Staff, 3 

Teachers contributions to, 198 
Trades and industries 

Adult, 148-150, 168, 171 

Enrollment. 100-101, 111 
Each high school, 242-247 

Federal aid. 168-172 

Schools offering. 122, 242-247 

Teachers. 122 
Training centers. State teachers colleges. 193- 

194 

Transportation of pupils, 172-176, 230 

Cost, total and per pupil. 172. 174-175, 230 
Per cent of pupils transported, 173 

Tuition charges. State teachers colleges. 196-197 

Turnover in teaching staff. 131-136 

V 

Value of 

Assessable property. 184-186 

School property, 179-180 
Vocational education, 2, 4-6, 59-60, 168-172, 

206, 225 

Enrollment, day schools, 100-101, 111. 169- 
170. 172, 242-247 

Evening schools, 148-150, 171 

Federal aid. 168-172. 206, 225 

State aid, 206 
Vocational guidance. 2. 122, 172 
Vocational rehabilitation. 2-3, 61-64, 152-153, 

206-207 

w 

War emergency certificates, 126-130 
Wealth back of each pupil. 186 
Withdrawals of pupils 

Elementary, 82 

High, 120-121 
Withdrawals of teachers. 131-132 

Y 

Year, length of school, 74. 221 



• 



t 



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